Trump No Longer a COVID-19 ‘Transmission Risk,’ White House Doctor Says

President Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, his doctor said Saturday evening, nine days after the president first tested positive for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Conley added.

Conley’s announcement came hours after Trump held his first public event since his October 1 diagnosis, which had been followed by a three-day stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Ahead of the event, the White House would not say whether Trump had yet tested negative for the coronavirus.

Trump delivered remarks in a brief 18-minute address on law and order from the White House balcony to a crowd of several hundred mostly- masked supporters on the South Lawn.

“I’m feeling great,” Trump told the crowd, only briefly mentioning his health.

He said he was thankful for the good wishes and prayers he received and said the pandemic was “disappearing,” though it has killed more than 210,000 Americans and shows no signs of slowing down.

Conley issued a statement Thursday evening saying that he anticipated Trump would be able to hold public events again by Saturday.

“Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote, adding that, “Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team

The 4 Best Bathroom Heaters

I’m convinced there’s nothing worse than stepping out of the shower onto an icy cold floor. Sure, you can snag a bath mat or put a towel over the tile, but only a good bathroom heater can make the space feel toasty warm. And the best bathroom heaters fit your space while boasting the important safety features you need to feel comfortable.

Before you invest in a new heater, you have to be honest with yourself about the amount of space you’re willing to give up for comfort. Here are some options to consider:

  • Portable floor heaters: There is no need to mount these heaters to a wall and they usually heat up spaces in a flash. The downside is that you can’t hook them up to your thermostat, which means you won’t have precise control over the temperature — and, of course, they can pose a safety hazard if they’re positioned close to flammable objects like paper. Look for a unit with auto-shutoff in case you forget to turn it off when you leave your bathroom.
  • Wall heaters: For more a more permanent heating solution, you can install a wall heater that is convenient, space-saving, and efficient — but that will often require more DIY installation. This option does require DIY work and includes a visible electrical wire that needs to be carefully positioned away from water sources. Installing a bathroom wall heater may require you to cut into drywall, so only invest in one if you have gotten the okay from your landlord or feel confident adding this upgrade to a home you own.
  • Ceiling heaters: This is a great option for smaller bathrooms, as it won’t take up valuable wall or floor space. These more compact heaters mount to standard electrical boxes and but require installation, and

Bulletproof Sprinter van deters attack with pepper spray, sonic cannon

  • AddArmor turns ordinary SUVs, sedans, and sports cars into highly secure vehicles packed with luxury features, and it just announced its latest offering based on the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter. 
  • The company, founded by military and law enforcement veterans, turns vehicles into bulletproof “mobile safe rooms” for business leaders, celebrities, and other VIPs.
  • Customers can order their Sprinter with a variety of custom, private jet-influenced interiors. 
  • They can also add on security capabilities like pepper spray dispensers, a sonic cannon, an escape hatch, and shocking door handles. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Spacious and low-key, Mercedes-Benz Sprinters have become a favorite of DIYers and professionals alike during the current camper-van conversion boom. But both those qualities also make Sprinters excellent platforms for lavish armored vehicles desired by corporate executives, celebrities, and politicians. 

AddArmor, a Wyoming-based firm that specializes in transforming normal cars into discreet “mobile safe rooms,” recently added the Sprinter to its lineup of armored vehicles. On top of the cost of the vehicle, $28,000 buys you the base “Anti-Intrusion Package” — complete with ballistic glass and custom-fit protection panels to fortify the vehicle’s body.

But aside from armoring, AddArmor also offers customers a vast array of optional security features, like sirens, a smokescreen system, or a night-vision system. And that all makes sense, given that the company was founded by former US Special Mission Unit Commander Pete Blaber and is staffed by former law enforcement and security professionals.

Blaber had his first brush with armored vehicles while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, during which time he led a military research project that worked to develop lighter armoring and ballistic glass, he told Business Insider. Now, AddArmor outfits its vehicles with armoring that’s considerably lighter and stronger than traditional ballistic steel, building more than 10,000 cars over the last

Why the ‘Home Improvement Effect’ May Be Responsible for an Increased Interest in Plastic Surgery

Encino, CA plastic surgeon George Sanders, MD had never done a virtual consultation until March of this year.

But, once COVID hit, it quickly became commonplace at his practice. 

“At first, there were maybe one or two per week, but then there were many—often several each day,” he recalls. “Not only did patients virtually consult, but they scheduled their surgery in anticipation of the end of the surgery shutdown.”

And the calendar concurs: Since his office reopened for elective procedures in mid-May, the surgery schedule has been filled. “Part of this is due to the backlog of patients who were already scheduled for surgery but had to postpone it. Other patients were planning to have surgery anyway, and now seems like the perfect opportunity.”

However, Dr. Sanders says, there’s a third patient group that never considered surgery and are now drawn to it. 

“When I ask these patients seeking plastic surgery why they are doing it, there are a number of reasons that are given. Home improvement has become a big thing during the pandemic. People are spending more time at home and see the need for home improvement. The same reasoning spills over into plastic surgery—patients have more time to spend looking at themselves and are seeing all sorts of needs that can be met by plastic surgery.”

It also comes as no surprise that many patients are not working, or they are able to work from home and recover there while still doing their job. “This gives those who were thinking about surgery before the pandemic, as well as those who began to think of having surgery during the pandemic, a wonderful opportunity because the element of time is often what is missing from the equation when it comes to recovering from surgery,” Dr. Sanders says.   

Remote Recovery

Amateur hour at the Trump White House

The initial reaction might be, So what’s new here? But recent days, in the wake of Trump being stricken with coronavirus, have highlighted just how the lurching improvisation that is a familiar phenomenon around Trump has entered a different phase. The professionals around the president aren’t merely laboring to contain and channel the disruptive politician they work for. Very often they are amplifying the chaos.

That’s in part because, as his first term comes to a close, the professionals around Trump are not all that professional. It is now the exception in key staff and Cabinet posts to have people whose experience would be commensurate with that of people who have typically held those jobs in previous administrations of both parties. This major weakness has been revealing itself in a barrage of minor errors that summon Casey Stengel’s incredulous question about the 1962 New York Mets: Can’t anybody here play this game?

There have been prominent misspellings in official White House statements (the pharmaceutical company whose treatment Trump took is Regeneron, not Regeron. Trump bungled the name of a well-known Republican senator (that’s James Inhofe, not Imhofe) in a video message. Communications Director Alyssa Farah did much the same in a television interview, repeatedly mispronouncing the name of Trump’s physician (it’s Dr. Sean Conley, with two syllables, not Connelly with three).

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow on Wednesday contradicted each other in public remarks on whether a recuperating, but still possibly infectious Trump had been in the Oval Office the day before. (Kudlow thought he had, Meadows was apparently right that on that day Trump hadn’t.)