Affect

Will a Housing Market Crash Affect Home Depot Stock?

Will the housing market crash again? Maybe. Many aspects of the economy are cyclical, and housing prices do occasionally fall. Is a housing crash imminent? That’s harder to answer.

Some have sounded the alarm on housing for good reason. Consider the famous Case-Shiller Home Price Index, an inflation-adjusted metric created by Standard & Poor’s tracking housing prices. The index’s value was 100 back in the year 2000 and had been close to 100 when applying the index’s criteria backward to the 20th century. But since 2000, it has risen above 180 on two occasions. The first time preceded the housing crash of the Great Recession.

The second time the Case-Shiller index exceeded 180 is right now. In reality, it passed the mark way back in 2016, and it’s currently around 215. So no need to panic: Crossing 180 doesn’t immediately flip a housing-crash switch. It just shows housing prices have gone up a lot. The bigger problem, though, is how much faster home values are growing relative to average income. Consider the data over just the last 10 years.

Case-Shiller Home Price Index: National Chart

Data by YCharts.

It’s probably unsustainable for home values to outpace personal income long term. Eventually people could be priced out of affordable housing, and that could spark a housing market correction. Will that affect companies like Home Depot (NYSE:HD)?

To answer that, we can start by going back to the Great Recession. 

A model house sits atop Jenga blocks while a businessman removes a piece, creating instability.

Image source: Getty Images.

The last time Home Depot’s revenue fell

Home Depot’s revenue fell from 2007 to 2009. In fiscal 2006, when things were going well, the company generated $90.8 billion in full-year net sales. In fiscal 2009, it generated just $66.2 billion — down 27% over three years. Likewise, net earnings took a hit as the company lost operating leverage from lower sales per location.