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The return of warm, earthy browns is among fall decor trends | Home & Garden

Don’t overdo brown, she warns, but blend it with modern materials like marble for beautiful juxtapositions.

“Bringing it in with light woods, leathers and other natural materials can help make a space feel timeless,” Jimenez says.

Melissa Morgan of M Interiors in San Antonio, Texas, thinks brown’s rebirth is “a reaction to years of very light, tonal interiors. Clients are looking for warmth and sanctuary in their homes more than ever.”

Lighter, yellowish browns, like caramel, often works well in leather.

“In upholstery, we consider saddle leather to be a form of brown that’s like a trusty pair of blue jeans – it goes with everything,” said Chicago designer Brynn Olson.

Soft browns and caramels are also appearing in pillows, lamps and drapes. Caning is on trend too, said Amy Leferink of Interior Impressions in Woodbury, Minn.

As for furniture, Olson likes the effect of brown stains on walnut and white oak, and said that a beautifully stained built-in is timeless. “Natural walnut will always feel fresh, and we love to pair it with bright white decor such as plaster vases, for a sophisticated pairing of textures,” she said.

That brown-and-white combo has been a favorite of decorating icons including Billy Baldwin, said New York City designer Glenn Gissler. Baldwin’s apartment in Manhattan featured a mix of glossy brown walls, white and chartreuse furniture, and brass accents. Inspired, Gissler recently painted a New York loft in a deep, rich brown, with columns and ceilings in crisp white. A long, tuxedo-style sofa in milk-chocolatey velvet anchors the space, along with tonal modern art.

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Number of Covid cases grows among people who attended White House ceremony

The number of people from President Donald Trump’s inner circle who have tested positive for the coronavirus is growing, with at least seven confirmed cases tied to an event in the Rose Garden last weekend.

On Saturday, Trump officially announced Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the next U.S. Supreme Court justice at an outdoor ceremony attended by more than 150 people, many who did not wear masks or social distancing.

In addition to the president and first lady, at least five other who were at the ceremony have been confirmed to have Covid-19: former top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway, Republican Sens. Thom Tillis from North Carolina and Mike Lee from Utah, Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins and a White House journalist.

Conway is the latest to confirm she was infected.

“Tonight I tested positive for COVID-19,” she said in a statement Friday night. “My symptoms are mild (light cough) and I’m feeling fine. I have begun a quarantine process in consultation with physicians. As always, my heart is with everyone affected by this global pandemic.”

Trump, who is being treated at Walter Reed Hospital, where he is receiving experimental treatment and expected to remain for several days, revealed in a tweet his and Melania Trump’s diagnoses early Friday, sending everything from the upcoming presidential election to the Supreme Court confirmation into question.

Democrats were quick to call for a delay in Barrett’s confirmation hearing, but Republicans pushed back and said they intend to move forward with the process. Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in a tweet Friday that the hearings remain scheduled to begin Oct. 12 and raised the possibility of virtual hearings.

“We now have two members of the Senate Judiciary Committee who have tested

White House Silence on Trump’s Health Fuels Wild Rumors and Worry Among DC Diplomats

Foreign diplomats are scrambling to figure out how the iconoclastic American President will cope with his COVID-19 diagnosis and hospitalization, chasing rumors from the ridiculous — that he might somehow put his daughter in charge — to darker fears that U.S. adversaries like Iran or China might take advantage of this turbulent moment.



a man standing on top of a grass covered field: Members of the U.S. Secret Service wear protective masks as Marine One, with U.S. President Donald Trump on board, departs the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 2, 2020.


© Sarah Silbiger—Bloomberg/Getty Images
Members of the U.S. Secret Service wear protective masks as Marine One, with U.S. President Donald Trump on board, departs the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 2, 2020.

Trump’s hours-long silence after tweeting his positive diagnosis early Friday morning fed rumor and disinformation, foreign officials and Republican advisors both say. For several hours on Friday, a White House defined by Trump as its master, if not sole communicator, seemed frozen and slow to respond to queries even from Trump’s inner circle, the two GOP advisors say.

Video of Trump walking to Marine One to fly to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and his tweeted video message to well-wishers may reassure some, but his pale demeanor and infamously rocky relationship with the truth has laid the groundwork for skepticism toward the White House claims late Friday that the President was “fatigued” and only being moved to the hospital for “tests.” That language mirrors official statements from the British government when Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to the hospital for “routine tests” as a “precautionary measure” before later admitting to the British public that he nearly died.

The President’s “loose association with the truth isn’t just a domestic problem, clearly it’s a huge foreign national security problem,” one of the GOP advisors says. “People just don’t trust this Administration.” The advisor said she was met with ominous silence when asking for talking points, when someone like

Condo set among treetops beckoned garden-loving couple

“The Colonnade was built in the 1960s and has Old World construction, including solid plaster walls, wood floors and nine-foot-high ceilings,” says Molinaroli, a designer and museum exhibition consultant. “We wanted to play off the traditional classical elements of the apartment with a contemporary kitchen and modern bathrooms. Plus, as a museum designer, I’m interested in setting up spaces to display art and using lighting to direct people’s attention to different features.”

Molinaroli started the design process with two oak columns with their original finish that he has owned since 1978 when they were salvaged from a building in downtown D.C.

“The columns have been with me in every home, so here we used them to frame the living and dining area, which has a nice flow,” he says.

The renovation included replastering the walls to make them level, adding new wide-plank French oak floors, new custom moldings to complement the columns and new windows with electronic shades. A museum-quality lighting system was installed in the ceiling to showcase the couple’s art collection and the grand piano Carabetta, music director of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Georgetown, has recently used to record videos for virtual church services.

The terrace was repaved with bluestone, the kitchen includes European high-glass cabinets and upgraded appliances, and the bathrooms have been renovated with Porcelanosa tile and high-end fixtures such as a soaking tub by Waterworks.

The Colonnade condominium has been famous since it opened in 1966 as home to high-profile Washingtonians, including journalists Rita Braver and Diane Rehm, as well as the late senator Harry F. Byrd Jr. (D-Va.) and descendants of former presidents Roosevelt and Eisenhower.

“Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor lived above us when we first moved into our condo in 2015,” says Carabetta. “The daughter of the former owner