Amy

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans

WASHINGTON – Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett fought back Tuesday against caricatures that she is a committed advocate for conservative causes chosen by President Donald Trump to do his bidding on issues ranging from abortion to the Affordable Care Act.

Barrett: Noboday wants ‘Law of Amy’

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In a marathon session before the Senate Judiciary Committee just three weeks from Election Day, Barrett was put on the defensive by Democrats charging that she was picked because of her views on abortion, gun rights, same-sex marriage and particularly the health care law headed to the high court for the third time next month.

“That is their stated objective and plan. Why not take them at their word?” Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., said in reference to Republicans and special-interest groups backing Barrett’s nomination.

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Barrett strived to show her independence from the president and conservative forces that have joined together in hopes of a speedy confirmation, wedged tightly between Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death and an election that Trump has made clear could be challenged in court.

“I certainly hope that all members of the committee have more confidence in my integrity than to think that I would allow myself to be used as a pawn to decide the election for the American people,” Barrett said.

More: Supreme Court begins 2020 term as a key election issue: Will it decide the election, too?

But several Democrats implied just that. They urged Barrett to pledge that if confirmed, she would recuse herself both from cases involving the election and from the challenge to the Affordable Care Act.

“Republicans are scrambling to confirm this nominee as fast as possible because they need

‘It Came Down to What I Could Make at My Kitchen Table’: Amy Sherald on Experimenting With a New Medium for the First Time in Decades

On October 19th, Hauser and Wirth gallery will present a series of five new paintings by artist Amy Sherald in an online exhibition titled “Womanist is to Feminist as Purple is to Lavender.” The title draws from a phrase attributed to Alice Walker and her exploration of “womanist” ideology, which accounted for the intersectional experiences of Black women left out of established feminism, in the anthology titled In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens, from 1983.

In these new paintings, Sherald conducts an examination of identity analogous to Walker’s, experimenting with new materials and themes that celebrate femininity, self-awareness, and leisure through the prism of Blackness. In doing so, the artist reveals expressions of Black life that have been historically absent in Black imagery. She presents simple acts of leisure that are not luxuries of privilege or passive pursuits, but essential elements of wellness that remind us of the restorative power of joy.

Amy Sherald approaches social portraiture with an intentionality that is expressed in the unique characteristics of her paintings. Her grey skin tones have become abstractions of blackness that reject social stratifications that underlie racism and colorism. Sherald paints her subjects on solid color backgrounds that accentuate the contrasting shades of their clothing and the lush texture of their natural coifs. Her intentionality extends to the visual parity the artist creates in the leveled gaze between the subject and viewer, asserting her subject’s rightful place in the pantheon of portraiture.

Taken together, these artistic devices subvert narrow social constructs around blackness while maintain the essence of its beauty. Her work has earned her the critical and popular acclaim that led to her 2018 portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama in the National Portrait Gallery and, most recently, a commission for a portrait of Breonna Taylor featured that became

Fauci calls Amy Coney Barrett ceremony in Rose Garden ‘superspreader event’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, on Friday called President Donald Trump’s Rose Garden ceremony last month announcing Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court a “superspreader event.”

Fauci, who was interviewed by CBS News Radio’s White House correspondent Steven Portnoy, defended the efficacy of wearing masks to slow the spread of Covid-19 and used the ceremony as an example.

“Well, I think the data speaks for themselves. We had a superspreader event in the White House and it was in a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks,” he said. “So the data speak for themselves.”

This is not the first time Fauci has been at odds with Trump, who has had a cavalier attitude toward Covid-19 since being released from the hospital Monday after being infected with the virus, and has boasted about his apparent recovery and given mixed messaging around wearing masks.

Fauci survived a previous White House attempt to discredit him after he contradicted the president’s more optimistic assessment of the progress of the pandemic and corrected the president’s claim that the virus is the same as the flu.

Trump announced Barrett, a federal appeals judge, as his nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the next Supreme Court justice at an outdoor ceremony Sept. 26, attended by more than 150 people, many of whom did not wear masks or practice social distancing.

In addition to the president and the first lady, several other people who were at the ceremony have been confirmed to have Covid-19: former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway, Republican Sens. Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Mike Lee of Utah, University of Notre Dame President John Jenkins and a White House journalist.

Following that event, the number of people

Amy Coney Barrett Rose Garden Event Was a WH COVID Superspreader, New Data Suggests

Shortly after judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination event at the White House’s Rose Garden, a number of those in attendance tested positive for COVID-19 and new data suggests that the event was a superspreader for the virus.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: U.S. President Donald Trump announces 7th U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House September 26, 2020 in Washington, DC.


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty
U.S. President Donald Trump announces 7th U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House September 26, 2020 in Washington, DC.

According to data, that was released on Tableau Public by Peter James Walker, at least 37 cases of the new coronavirus were confirmed within 12 days after Barrett’s nomination event on September 26. In an email sent to Newsweek, Walker explained that the data is all crowd-sourced from public information, such as “tweets from verified reporters, news articles in trusted outlets, etc.”

Walker also noted that the site has an online tip line for anyone to forward new information, which is then verified with real articles before it is added to the tracker.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania were two of the biggest names to test positive for COVID-19 after the event, but several other positive tests were reported shortly after.

The data shows that at least 11 people that attended the September 26 event tested positive for COVID-19.

In addition to Trump and the first lady, the data show the others who tested positive after attending the event include Washington-based photojournalist Al Drago, former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, California Pastor Greg Laurie, University of Notre Dame President John Jenkins, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, former counselor to Trump Kellyanne Conway, Utah Senator Mike Lee, North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis and a White House press corps journalist.

World Reacts To Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Testing Positive For Coronavirus

Amy Coney Barrett bus tour features conservative Christian activist who was exposed to coronavirus at White House

But instead of isolating herself at home in Washington, in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, the conservative activist is traveling the country. Since Wednesday, she has been boosting Barrett from a pastel pink bus bearing the nominee’s face and the words “Women For Amy” as it makes its way through a dozen swing states this month.

So far, the tour — officially put on by Nance’s group, Concerned Women for America — has kicked off with Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) near Atlanta, hosted college students in South Carolina, and met with Rep. Dan Bishop (R-N.C.) in Raleigh, with nearly 30 more stops planned.

At all the stops so far, attendees have posed for photos while standing shoulder to shoulder, with few masks in sight, according to social media posts. (Loeffler, who also attended the White House ceremony, said she has since tested negative for the virus.)

It is unclear if Nance or others on the bus have been tested for the coronavirus, which has killed more than 212,000 people in the United States. Her organization declined to comment to the Guardian on the apparent lack of masks and social distancing at its events, and did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Washington Post.

Nance is far from the only person potentially exposed in the Rose Garden, The Post reported, who has since scattered around the country with little oversight and no systematic contacting tracing efforts. On Thursday, Donald Trump Jr., who accompanied his father to the presidential debate and said he tested negative, held a packed campaign rally inside a Florida hotel.

In its focus on rallying support to confirm Barrett, a former clerk for Justice Antonin Scalia, Concerned Women for America will tour several states in the coming days that have