attack

Bulletproof Sprinter van deters attack with pepper spray, sonic cannon

  • AddArmor turns ordinary SUVs, sedans, and sports cars into highly secure vehicles packed with luxury features, and it just announced its latest offering based on the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter. 
  • The company, founded by military and law enforcement veterans, turns vehicles into bulletproof “mobile safe rooms” for business leaders, celebrities, and other VIPs.
  • Customers can order their Sprinter with a variety of custom, private jet-influenced interiors. 
  • They can also add on security capabilities like pepper spray dispensers, a sonic cannon, an escape hatch, and shocking door handles. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Spacious and low-key, Mercedes-Benz Sprinters have become a favorite of DIYers and professionals alike during the current camper-van conversion boom. But both those qualities also make Sprinters excellent platforms for lavish armored vehicles desired by corporate executives, celebrities, and politicians. 

AddArmor, a Wyoming-based firm that specializes in transforming normal cars into discreet “mobile safe rooms,” recently added the Sprinter to its lineup of armored vehicles. On top of the cost of the vehicle, $28,000 buys you the base “Anti-Intrusion Package” — complete with ballistic glass and custom-fit protection panels to fortify the vehicle’s body.

But aside from armoring, AddArmor also offers customers a vast array of optional security features, like sirens, a smokescreen system, or a night-vision system. And that all makes sense, given that the company was founded by former US Special Mission Unit Commander Pete Blaber and is staffed by former law enforcement and security professionals.

Blaber had his first brush with armored vehicles while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, during which time he led a military research project that worked to develop lighter armoring and ballistic glass, he told Business Insider. Now, AddArmor outfits its vehicles with armoring that’s considerably lighter and stronger than traditional ballistic steel, building more than 10,000 cars over the last

Raccoons for Trump! Why did the nocturnal beasts attack White House journalists? | Animals

Name: Raccoons.

Age: Typically, raccoons live only about two to three years in the wild because of disease, lack of food, predation, human intervention etc. In captivity, they can live considerably longer.

Fascinating. But presumably we’re not talking about raccoons – the North American mammal, member of the Procyonidae family – in general, but some specific and more newsworthy raccoons? Very specific and very newsworthy. We’re talking about the press-attacking raccoons of the White House.

No way. Go on, what happened? Four of them went for reporters and a photographer, grabbing their clothes as they went about their business on the north lawn.

Another sinister and disgusting attack against the press in the land of the so-called free! You could say. “Strong Pawnee vibes at White House this morning, as a raccoon attacked multiple news crews,” tweeted Paul Reid, the White House correspondent for CBS News. He added that the animals had “allegedly” grabbed a photographer’s trouser leg and had to be “fended off”.

Good thing he said “allegedly” – raccoons are notoriously litigious. Pawnee? The fictional raccoon-infested Indiana town in Greg Daniels’ and Michael Schur’s satirical TV sitcom Parks and Recreation.

Of course. But this is real, clearly political and underhand. They have obviously been trained to make sure the press can’t ask Trump any difficult questions – by any means. Allegedly. Obviously, that has been suggested, many times, amusingly, on the usual platforms. If everything else fails, release the raccoons!

Was Fox there? No, just the four raccoons.

No, silly. Fox News, the conservative, Trump-friendly cable news channel. Oh, I see … Hmm, no, there’s no mention of them being there at the time, actually.

See! Nothing suspicious about that. It’s clearly a plot. Send them in when they’re not there. Destroy! It’s rare