brings

Silver Lake apartment garden brings COVID-19 relief

When Jamie Renee Williams wanted to learn more about soil and permaculture, she volunteered at several urban farms throughout Los Angeles: Cottonwood Urban Farm in Panorama City, Huarache Farms in Sierra Madre and Farm L.A., located in Elysian Valley. When she wanted to implement what she was learning in the community, she began working with a community-led compost pick-up service to expand its reach. And when the coronavirus outbreak forced her to shelter in place, she transformed a tiny stretch of dirt next to her apartment into an edible garden.

“I thought for many years that it would be amazing to work on restoring it in some way,” Williams, 37, said of the garden in Silver Lake that she planted in March. “I had been reading books on permaculture such as “The One-Straw Revolution: An Introduction to Natural Farming,” and when I started going to a bunch of different farms they were all doing something different. I was afraid of growing food. I have killed plenty of plants. But the pandemic and quarantine pushed me to do it. I figured I have all this time and nothing to lose.”

Before the pandemic, Williams juggled UX design work, volunteering and helping broaden the Compostable pickup service. But with more free time on her hands — and like so many who have struggled with isolation while sheltering in place — the garden offered her an opportunity to navigate her way through the pandemic.

“I felt like I had a partner through this pandemic,” she said. “It’s been really rewarding. I have learned that plants, like people, need to be together in a community.”

For Williams, who will be offering a guided virtual tour of the garden on Thursday as part of this week’s annual LA Design Festival, the garden is “reclaimed space

Brookshire brings community kitchen to Acadiana to help feed those affected by Hurricane Delta | News

Brookshire Grocery Co., the company that owns Super 1 Foods, is deploying a community kitchen and a team of employee-partners to serve free hot meals to people who have been affected by Hurricane Delta in Acadiana, according to a statement from the company.

Starting Sunday, a team will serve sausage biscuits for breakfast and hamburgers and hotdogs for lunch and dinner in the Super 1 Foods parking lots listed below, while supplies last at each location.

Sunday

11:30 a.m. — 215 W. Willow St. in Lafayette

5 p.m. — 924 Rees St. in Breaux Bridge

Monday

8 a.m. — 939 S. Lewis St. in New Iberia

11:30 a.m. — 939 S. Lewis St. in New Iberia

5 p.m. — 2210 Veterans Memorial Drive in Abbeville

Tuesday 

11:30 a.m. — 1800 W. Laurel St. in Eunice

5 p.m. — 2418 S. Union St. in Opelousas

Wednesday

8 a.m. — 2418 S. Union St. in Opelousas

Despite widespread damage and outages, a sigh of relief that Delta wasn’t worse in Acadiana

Hundreds of thousands still without power in Louisiana, more than 20k in East Baton Rouge

Lafayette, Vermilion school districts opt to cancel school early next week after Hurricane Delta damage

Source Article

Interior Design brings color to the Parade of Homes | Real Estate

The Housing and Building Association’s Parade of Homes started this weekend and continues today and next weekend, with eight homes that are available for online touring, and seven homes that are available for in-person visits. With the popularity of home remodeling shows from areas across the country, it’s easy to stay on top of home interior styles elsewhere, but the Parade is a great opportunity to see the styles that locals love.

The experts say that the Grand Valley is typically a few years behind the rest of the country when it comes to home interior design choices, but one thing is consistent with local design preferences regardless of whether a home was designed in Tuscan style back in 2006 or in modern farmhouse in 2020: rustic never quite goes away, and it’s not uncommon to see the outside brought inside with textures, colors and materials during the Parade of Homes.

“Western Colorado is more nature-oriented,” said Courtney Carrigan, interior designer with Porter Homes. Although the Porter Homes Parade entry has tile flooring throughout the house, wood flooring remains a popular choice for most people, whether it’s hardwood, engineered wood, luxury vinyl tile (LVT) or luxury vinyl plank (LVP).

Sitting on the edge of Colorado National Monument, the Porter Homes house on Broadway features quite a few wood accents, even though none of them are on the floor.

“The biggest feature in the great room is the 16-foot tall ceilings with the timber beams,” Carrigan said, adding that the outdoor kitchen and the front entryway also feature great ceiling detail with wooden beams and tongue-in-groove looks.

“Rustic is more regional,” Carrigan said, “timber beams are a trend everywhere; it goes with the farmhouse look, but it will stick here in western Colorado because of our proximity to the mountains.”

Neutral

Dallas Agency Brings Coding In-House to Target Covid-19 Aid

The Dallas Housing Authority’s efforts to distribute Covid-19 housing assistance to the city’s renters were bolstered by a sales software system reconfigured with features that enabled officials to grant aid more quickly and equitably.

The governmental agency, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, in August was tasked with distributing $4 million to income-eligible renters before Dec. 31 as part of the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.

To meet the deadline and ensure the funds would reach the neediest families, DHA staffers customized an existing software program from Zoho Corp. to automate tasks and map the most economically vulnerable neighborhoods in the city. Zoho’s customer relationship-management software is primarily intended for sales teams.

“If we can leverage technology to move faster but also move with intention, that was really the spirit of what I tried to accomplish here,” said Dr. Myriam Igoufe, vice president of policy development and research at DHA.

The Dallas Housing Authority’s system for managing Cares Act funds is based on customer-relationship management software from Zoho Corp.



Photo:

Dallas Housing Authority

The automated system her team built went live in late August and started approving checks to landlords last week.

Early results are encouraging, she said. Staff now have a better understanding of who is applying and from what sections of the city, an important distinction that enables officials to better sense whether the money allocated to one district may run out and adjust plans if needed.

Approximately 1,525 people applied for rent relief funds through DHA, with 388 approved to have checks sent to their landlords in the coming weeks. Sixty-three percent of those accepted applicants came from neighborhoods above the 80th percentile in terms of being the most vulnerable. Without the system they have created, Dr. Igoufe said,

True Food Kitchen brings healthy menu to Easton

Gary Seman Jr.
 |  For The Columbus Dispatch

The proliferation of upscale healthy food restaurants shows that a good portion of the dining public won’t hold its nose at plant-based dishes and is even willing to pay top dollar for them.

True Food Kitchen, the latest to join the central Ohio sphere of natural-foods’ restaurants, offers a balance of “healthy and delicious,” said Christine Barone, CEO of the Phoenix-based restaurant chain.

“It has to start with delicious because food is one of life’s greatest pleasures,” Barone said. “It has to be a sense of discovery and a real experience.”

True Food Kitchen, 4052 Worth Ave. in Easton Town Center, has a sleek, modern look, with a verdant color scheme, spacious dining room, light wood paneling stacked up to the towering ceiling, and mix of low- and high-top tables. A retractable wall opens to the year-round patio.

Columbus is the 35th location of True Food Kitchen, whose founder is Dr. Andrew Weil, a diet guru and specialist of “integrative medicine,” the restaurant’s website said.

Founded in 2008, it was serious about sourcing good ingredients, Barone said.

“I think at the beginning it was kind of niche,” she said. “Organic kale was hard to find.”

Although “organic” is not the byword at True Food Kitchen; its menu is influenced by sustainability and the Environmental Working Group – a nonprofit group that publishes reports on more naturally grown food, and those that are cultivated with the use of pesticides – among other initiatives, Barone said.

The menu, while not fully vegetarian or vegan, is veggie-centric with dishes such as jackfruit lettuce wraps, ancient-grains bowl and charred cauliflower.

The menu changes seasonally and the sauces and dressings are made in-house, Barone said.

Of the meat dishes, the kitchen features lasagna Bolognese with fennel chicken