design

How this Hong Kong apartment’s views informed its interior design



a kitchen with a dining room table: Tommy Hui designed this Wong Chuk Hang apartment, aptly named the Bird Hide, to make the most of its panoramic views. Photography: Steven Ko


Tommy Hui designed this Wong Chuk Hang apartment, aptly named the Bird Hide, to make the most of its panoramic views. Photography: Steven Ko

A good view is a terrible thing to waste. And the view from the 690 sq ft Wong Chuk Hang flat that Tommy Hui Shui-cheung was hired to renovate is truly spectacular: a sweeping panorama of Bennett’s Hill and Aberdeen Harbour, with folds of greenery rolling into the sea.

“We wondered how to focus the interior on the views,” says Hui, founder of local architecture firm TBC Studio.

The clients, a young couple – a nurse and an urban planner – plan to have children, but for now they wanted a sanctuary where they could relax with family and friends. Hui worked with them to create a design he calls the Bird Hide, a reference to lookouts built to observe nature, birds especially, at close range.

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Hui wanted to make the flat as calming as its views, so he chose a relaxed palette of blond wood, complemented by a creamy pastel blue-green – the colour of the sea on a sunny day.



diagram, engineering drawing


© Provided by South China Morning Post


“We separated the living room and the dining room into two material finishes: wood veneer on one side and paint on the other,” says Hui. “For the paint, it needed to be a colour that wasn’t too dark, something more natural and cosy.”

The layout needed small changes, too. The flat’s front door opens directly into the dining and living area, so Hui used a slatted partition to create a foyer offering a gradual transition into the flat.

The next challenge was the kitchen. As in most Hong Kong

SVA Interior Design Faculty Join NYCxDESIGN’s ‘Ode To NYC’ Poster Campaign

Jack Travis’ poster, We Keep From Goin’ Under, a reference to a lyric by Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five, the seminal South Bronx hip-hop group. “It was important to me to celebrate an iconic message expressing the love for my beloved city, created by one of the most beloved NYC designers, with another iconic message from my most beloved borough,” Travis says. “You cannot stop NYC. Love you, NYC, Miss you, Milton Glaser!”

 

NYCxDESIGN’s “Ode to NYC” posters are available for sale on Poster House’s website, with proceeds going to the Black Artists + Designers Guild (BADG), a nonprofit aimed at creating a more inclusive and equitable art and design world.

 

“The local designers we tapped have created poignant, inspiring posters that illustrate the resiliency, strength and rebirth of our beloved city,” says Valerie Hoffman, program director, NYCxDESIGN.

“As a collective of independent Black artists, makers and designers striving towards creating inclusive art and design environment through equity and representation, we are gratified and excited to be a part of this wonderful initiative, put forth by the efforts of so many talented New York-based creatives,” Malene Barnett, founder of BADG, says.

 

For more information on the “Ode to NYC” poster designers, locations and sale, go to NYCXDesign.

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Workshop/APD and April Bovet Interior Design Team Up on a Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Gem

In the dining room, Eoos chairs ring a custom concrete table beneath a Rich Brilliant Willing pendant fixture. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Each of the five boroughs contains a constellation of neighborhoods with their own cultural quirks and pervading personalities. In Cobble Hill, ethnically diverse mom-and-pop shops and traditional brownstones entwine with a boho art scene, yielding an old-school yet forward-thinking Brooklyn vibe. It’s here that Workshop/APD founding principal Andrew Kotchen was given the opportunity to nestle a unique piece of architecture between two 1900s town houses, at once putting into relief the district’s dual natures.

GamFratesi stools pull up to the kitchen’s granite-topped island. Photography by Donna Dotan.

“It’s rare to get the chance to run an intelligent design process that isn’t based in historical preservation,” Kotchen says of the ground-up plan he conceived for his client, a married couple with two teenage children. After performing initial zoning studies, he and the WAPD team demolished the existing residence and inserted a modernist glass-and-steel town house, encompassing 7,000 square feet and four bedrooms across six floors. “We didn’t set out to take up every inch of buildable square footage,” Kotchen continues. “The focus was on creating comfortable, livable rooms.” Leveraging ideas from past projects with this client, he has devised, in its “calming simplicity,” an exemplar of the contemporary urban home.

White-oak built-ins backdrop an Antonio Citterio sofa and ottoman in the living room. Photography by Donna Dotan.

The streamlined program begins with a triple-height entry atrium that references elements from the facade. A screen of ebonized-oak slats rises the full 31 feet and then crosses the ceiling, the orientations nodding to the exterior’s vertical windows and horizontal Belgian bricks, which extend into the entry. Furthermore, the slat color links to the blackened steel framing those windows. It

Toyota Yaris review – Interior, design and technology

Toyota has bestowed the Yaris with a strong, distinctive look. The muscular wheel arches, large grille and sharp creases all contribute to a more purposeful stance than on the previous model, and an appearance which translates well to the beefed-up Yaris GR performance model.

Inside the cabin it’s a different matter. The interior design is typically Toyota – solid and practical, but with very little sparkle or sense of style. The fascia is enveloped in gloomy, black plastic, with just a few metal-effect accents on show to improve the mood.

On the plus side, there is a good level of standard equipment on offer. The entry-level Icon trim includes 16-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights and wipers, adaptive cruise control, air conditioning, a reversing camera and a multi-function leather-trimmed steering wheel. 

Stepping up to the Design versions adds bigger 17-inch wheels, rear privacy glass, power-folding mirrors and keyless entry, while at the top end of the range, the Dynamic and Excel cars feature unique alloy wheel styles, climate control and enhanced safety kit. A head-up display system is offered with the Yaris Launch Edition.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

The Yaris has a half-decent infotainment system, mounted high on the dash where it’s easy to use. Any Toyota owner will recognise the familiar switchgear, but it’s all solid and functional.

Base versions feature a 7.0-inch touch screen with Bluetooth, a DAB radio and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity. Design-spec cars include a larger 8.0-inch display and moving further up the range sees the addition of a JBL premium audio system with eight speakers.

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2021 Mercedes S-Class Shows Exterior Design, Interior Tech On Camera