Safe

Lowe’s donates over $9 million to help keep homes safe and affordable in Charlotte

Lowe’s Home Improvement store is donating $9.25 million in funding, products and gift cards to organizations in Charlotte to keep “homes safe, healthy and affordable” amid the coronavirus crisis.

Lowe’s announced Tuesday it is making the donations in a combination of funding, products and gift cards to nearly 30 local charitable groups and businesses for affordable housing, skilled trades training and technology, the company announced Tuesday.

The Mooresville-based company is extending how it thinks about the word home, company executive vice president of human resources Janice Little said.

Little told the Observer the donations are another step in the company’s efforts to help with community projects. Lowe’s also has an employee volunteer program that has been focused on affordable housing and skilled trades over the last year.

“We really need to make sure that we can support all members of our community,” she said.

Some of the Charlotte hometown projects supported through the donation, according to Lowe’s, include:

? $1.67 million to Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region to support home repair, new home construction and two new apprentices for its apprenticeship program. Even with the COVID-19 pandemic, Habitat Charlotte Region has moved 26 families into newly completed homes.

• $1.33 million grant to the city of Charlotte for its Safe Housing Home Rehabilitation Program in the Beatties Ford Road Corridor to help with home repairs. It also helps older residents age in place and low- and moderate-income families be able to stay in their homes.

• $1 million to the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Foundation to create the Lowe’s Technology Lab at the new main branch offering technology help and classes.

? $50,000 donation to Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Foundation’s Connect for Tech program to help close the connectivity gap for local students during the pandemic.

• $200,000 in gift

Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?

With fiscal second-quarter sales growth of 23.4%, it’s safe to say Home Depot (NYSE: HD) has performed quite well during the coronavirus pandemic. As an essential business, the home improvement behemoth was able to keep its doors open to serve the needs of millions of shoppers.



a close up of a newspaper: Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?


© Provided by The Motley Fool
Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?

Its stock price has risen 30% so far this year, driven by impressive results from the do-it-yourself (DIY) segment. But for Home Depot to position itself for long-term success, its Pro business is the key.

Loading...

Load Error

Pandemic-fueled growth

From fiscal 2009 through fiscal 2019, Home Depot’s sales increased at a compound annual rate of 5.2%. The company has largely left its store growth unchanged with less than 50 net additions in that 10-year period, but management introduced initiatives like the One Home Depot strategy to boost efficiency within its existing store network. The company has reported positive comparable-sales growth for 10 years running.

Then, the coronavirus pandemic took hold earlier this year, closing down large swathes of the U.S. economy and at the same time creating an advantageous environment for Home Depot. With Americans stuck inside their homes, many chose to prioritize home improvement projects over other leisure and entertainment spending that has not been available in 2020.



a close up of a newspaper: coronavirus headlines sitting on top of 100 dollar bills


© Getty Images
coronavirus headlines sitting on top of 100 dollar bills

In the quarter ended Aug. 2, the company generated record-breaking sales of $38.1 billion. Supported by government stimulus measures, including deposits of $1,200 made to most Americans’ bank accounts, Home Depot’s DIY segment outpaced its Pro segment in the quarter. The money not spent on dining out and travel instead went toward fixing up the home.

Professional customers

The success with the DIY customer is promising for Home

White House doctor says Trump safe to return to public events on Saturday

White House physician Sean Conley said Thursday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the vice presidential debate Harris accuses Trump of promoting voter suppression Pence targets Biden over ISIS hostages, brings family of executed aid worker to debate MORE would be able to make a “safe return” to public events on Saturday, less than two weeks after being diagnosed with the novel coronavirus. 

Conley issued a memo Thursday evening stating that Trump had completed his therapy for COVID-19 and that he has responded “extremely well” to treatment overall. The update came just three days after Trump returned to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he received treatment for 72 hours.

“Since returning home, his physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness. Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote.

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” he continued.

Conley also said that, as of Thursday afternoon, Trump’s heart rate was 69 beats per minute, his blood pressure 127/81 mmHg, his respiratory rate 15-17 breaths per minute and his pulse oximetry 96-98 percent room air.

Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus one week ago and he experienced a high fever and two drops in his oxygen level after his diagnosis.

Trump was given the antiviral medication remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone and an experimental antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron in the course of his treatment. He was also given supplemental oxygen twice — once Friday and again on Saturday — according to his medical team.

Trump has been eager to get

Strawberry fest’s haunted house to be scary but safe, official says

Like most things in 2020, the Pasadena Strawberry Festival’s haunted house this year will feature some changes.

“It’s going to be a little different from last year because of COVID,” Murline Staley, the Strawberry Festival’s executive director, said of the fest’s third annual spookfest, A Berry Haunted House, which will be at the festival’s central building, 7902 W. Fairmont Parkway.

“We’re definitely taking a COVID action plan and being safe,” she said. “We’re guaranteed to scare the bejeevers out of you, but we’re also going to have fun. We’re going to have the same square footage, but instead of 13 rooms, this year, we’re going to open it up to seven rooms.”


That’s not counting the entrance area where creatures with eight legs could be greeting you. The spooks at A Berry Haunted House haven’t paid their insect extermination bill in recent months; so be forewarned — arachnids will likely be bountiful.

The event will change in one other way. Last year, the event ran Oct. 25-31. This year, the event will be only on Fridays and Saturdays starting Oct. 16 and ending Halloween.

“Tickets for the haunted house, which will be from 7-11 p.m each night it is scheduled, will be offered for sale by calling the festival at 281-991-9500 or by dropping by the festival offices on Fairmont Parkway once the event opens.

Admission is $5.

“We encourage people to call ahead, therefore the tickets will be ready for them and there won’t be long lines,” Staley said.

One thing visitors won’t have to be scared about is the amount of COVID-related safety measures, she said.

The haunted house will be sanitized each night before opening, hand-sanitizing stations will be located throughout the building and all the curtains that usually separate the scenes will be peeled back to

Trump’s Covid-plagued White House proves testing alone can’t keep America safe

President Donald Trump’s White House continues to rack up positive tests, from Hope Hicks to Stephen Miller. On Tuesday, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany (and two of her aides) tested positive for SARS-CoV2, the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. Despite knowing that she was in close contact with both the president and top adviser Hope Hicks prior to their diagnoses, McEnany not only refused to quarantine, but even continued to give briefings with reporters without a mask.

Her stated reason for this behavior, up until Monday afternoon? She hadn’t tested positive yet.

This behavior highlights a fundamental and dangerous misunderstanding of the point of Covid-19 tests — and their limitations. If we don’t know how to interpret and respond to tests, we risk the kind of disaster now unfolding at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

To be clear, testing is not a prevention strategy. Just like a pregnancy test cannot take the place of birth control, Covid-19 tests should not be seen as substitutes for robust strategies to reduce community transmission. It is part of the public health approach, but not for the reasons people think.

The first and most familiar reason people get tested is to obtain a definitive diagnosis. This type of testing is most often done for individuals with symptoms — people who have a cough, fever, loss of taste or smell, or fatigue. Asymptomatic contacts of a known Covid-19 positive patient may also be tested to rule out infection. This type of testing is usually done with a “PCR” test, which amplifies the virus and which is currently considered the gold standard for testing, although other more rapid forms of molecular tests can