scott

Tim Scott signals White House about getting Trump to ‘correct’ debate exchange on white supremacists

Sen. Tim Scott said he told the White House that President Trump should “correct” his statement in response to a debate question about white supremacists.



Tim Scott wearing a suit and tie


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The lone black Republican currently in the Senate said on Wednesday that he believes the president “misspoke” during the first face-off against former Vice President Joe Biden that was moderated by Fox News’s Chris Wallace.

“I think he misspoke in response to Chris Wallace’s comment. He was asking Chris what he wanted to say, I think he misspoke. I think he should correct it, if he doesn’t correct it, I guess he didn’t misspeak,” the South Carolina senator told reporters, according to CNN.

“I’ve already sent my comments to the chief of staff,” Scott noted, referring to Mark Meadows.

During the debate, Wallace asked Trump if he would also denounce far-right militias and white supremacist groups who have participated in violence.

Trump initially responded that he was “willing to do that,” but he did not explicitly condemn any group.

“Do you want to call them — what do you want to call them? Give me a name,” Trump asked Wallace before addressing a specific right-wing group, the Proud Boys.

“Proud Boys? Stand back and stand by. But I’ll tell you what, somebody has got to do something about antifa and the Left because this is not a right-wing problem, this is a left-wing problem,” he said.

The Trump campaign has attempted to downplay the president’s remarks at the debate, with spokesman Hogan Gidley saying Trump has condemned white supremacists in the past.

Earlier on Wednesday another Republican in the upper chamber, Sen. Mitt Romney, told reporters that “of course” Trump should have condemned white supremacists when given the opportunity during the debate.

Tags: News, Tim Scott, White

The rise of White House COVID-19 adviser Dr. Scott Atlas, a lockdown skeptic who increasingly has Trump’s ear and is worrying experts like Fauci



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Dr. Scott Atlas (right) speaks at White House press conference on September 23, 2020, as President Donald Trump (left) looks on. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty


© MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty
Dr. Scott Atlas (right) speaks at White House press conference on September 23, 2020, as President Donald Trump (left) looks on. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty

  • President Donald Trump brought Dr. Scott Atlas, a vocal anti-lockdown critic, onto his coronavirus task force in August.
  • Atlas is a healthcare-policy expert who works at the Hoover Institute, a conservative think tank at Stanford University. He is not an infectious-disease expert.
  • Yet the White House has increasingly brought him out to speak at recent coronavirus briefings instead of experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci or Dr. Deborah Birx.
  • He appears to be worrying top US health experts: CDC Director Robert Redfield was overheard saying “everything” Atlas says “is false,” and Fauci called him an “outlier” in his coronavirus views.
  • In response to Redfield and Fauci’s comments, Atlas told Business Insider: “Career government public health officials do not have a monopoly on knowledge.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Dr. Scott Atlas has only been on the White House’s coronavirus task force for a month, but appears to already have President Donald Trump’s ear and is worrying top experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci.

Atlas was brought onto Trump’s coronavirus task force in August, after appearing on Fox News for several months, where he often echoed the president’s views — including an opposition to lockdowns.

He is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, a conservative think tank at Stanford University.

Unlike the other experts on the task force, Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx, Atlas does not have a specialty in either infectious diseases or public health. Instead, he focuses on healthcare policy and has a background in neuroradiology, which is the reading of X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs.

Nonetheless, Atlas has become a favorite of the president, appearing often