SECRET

Colorado Springs artist creates secret garden in new exhibit | Arts & Entertainment

What lurks below a thriving garden might be even more beautiful.

Liz McCombs has spent months building a secret garden in her studio. What has emerged are ceramic and mixed-media humanlike sculptures all caught in the mysterious process of metamorphosis. Greenery sprouts up out of curled-up human figures; rootlike vegetables have grown heads sporting full lips and round eyes; and femalelike figures are given tangled roots for legs while lush gardens push up out of their skulls.


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Her pieces start with kiln-fired ceramic to which she adds recycled materials, such as wood, bark and pieces of glass.

“A key element of the show was transformation from one thing to something else,” says the longtime Colorado Springs artist. “In the garden you have birth, death, one thing nourishing something else, all things that make life life. I incorporate those ideas into each of the pieces. Each one has a unique story. They all fall under the overreaching idea of transition.”

“Secret Garden” is open now at Bridge Gallery. You can see the show from noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays through October. McCombs also will be working in the gallery throughout the month. Also on display will be a series of Halloween-inspired pieces, some influenced by the Day of the Dead Mexican holiday.

McCombs, an avid gardener, has always been fascinated by the cycle of life under the surface, and in this case, the garden. A simple seed is planted, watered and nourished with loving care and attention. How will that seed grow? What will it become? The possibilities are endless.

“It’s like the acorn turning into an oak tree,” she says. “I like the revealed and concealed idea. There are secrets inside all things and if given the right

How 2020’s ‘The Secret Garden’ differs from previous adaptations (exclusive)

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Watch: The Secret Garden trailer below

First published in 1911, Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel The Secret Garden is widely recognised as a classic of English children’s literature, and has been adapted countless times, on stage, on television, and on film.

The first filmed version – sadly now lost – was made just eight years after publication in 1919, while its most recent big screen adaptation, produced by Francis Ford Coppola, came in 1993. Now, in 2020 a new version of the classic childhood tale – which sees a young girl discovering a hidden oasis on her uncle’s land – is being released into cinemas and on Sky Cinema on 23 October.

Produced by Heyday Films and Studiocanal – the team who brought us Paddington and Paddington 2 – this new version stars newcomer Dixie Egerickx in the lead as Mary Lennox, with Colin Firth as her uncle Archibald Craven and Julia Walters as the housekeeper Mrs. Medlock, and promises to do something different with the source material.

Read more: The best new releases on Now TV and Sky Cinema in October

Speaking exclusively to Yahoo Movies UK, producer Rosie Alison (The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas/Testament of Youth) explained that, along with moving the story from the Edwardian period into a post-war setting, the new adaptation draws heavily on Burnett’s own memoirs to offer a new perspective on the tale.



a person wearing a costume: Exclusive behind-the-scenes look at The Secret Garden, which comes to cinemas and Sky Cinema across the UK and Ireland on 23 October. (Sky Cinema)


© Provided by Yahoo! Entertainment UK
Exclusive behind-the-scenes look at The Secret Garden, which comes to cinemas and Sky Cinema across the UK and Ireland on 23 October. (Sky Cinema)

They’ve “done more to emphasise the power of imagination which underpins the story,” Alison explains. “This is particularly true of our version of the garden,” which

How the new ‘The Secret Garden’ differs from previous versions

Watch: The Secret Garden trailer below

First published in 1911, Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel The Secret Garden is widely recognised as a classic of English children’s literature, and has been adapted countless times, on stage, on television, and on film.

The first filmed version – sadly now lost – was made just eight years after publication in 1919, while its most recent big screen adaptation, produced by Francis Ford Coppola, came in 1993. Now, in 2020 a new version of the classic childhood tale – which sees a young girl discovering a hidden oasis on her uncle’s land – is being released into cinemas and on Sky Cinema on 23 October.

Produced by Heyday Films and Studiocanal – the team who brought us Paddington and Paddington 2 – this new version stars newcomer Dixie Egerickx in the lead as Mary Lennox, with Colin Firth as her uncle Archibald Craven and Julia Walters as the housekeeper Mrs. Medlock, and promises to do something different with the source material.

Read more: The best new releases on Now TV and Sky Cinema in October

Speaking exclusively to Yahoo Movies UK, producer Rosie Alison (The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas/Testament of Youth) explained that, along with moving the story from the Edwardian period into a post-war setting, the new adaptation draws heavily on Burnett’s own memoirs to offer a new perspective on the tale.

Exclusive behind-the-scenes look at <em>The Secret Garden</em>, which comes to cinemas and Sky Cinema across the UK and Ireland on 23 October. (Sky Cinema)
Exclusive behind-the-scenes look at The Secret Garden, which comes to cinemas and Sky Cinema across the UK and Ireland on 23 October. (Sky Cinema)

They’ve “done more to emphasise the power of imagination which underpins the story,” Alison explains. “This is particularly true of our version of the garden,” which appears more fantastical than previous adaptations.

“For this we drew from the author’s fascinating memoir 

Central Pa. man who shot secret bathroom videos of 15-year-old girl denied break on prison term

A central Pennsylvania man who secretly shot nude bathroom videos of a teenage girl will be staying in prison after a state appeals court panel denied his appeal of his multiple child-sex convictions.

In an opinion by Senior Judge John L. Musmanno, the Superior Court rejected James A. Doll’s argument that police shouldn’t have been allowed to use the computer-based evidence they amassed against him.

Doll, 45, of Greencastle, claimed his computers were off-limits as evidence because his wife had no authority to give investigators permission to seize and search the devices for child pornography. He also insisted the search warrants police used to seize his computers weren’t sufficiently specific.

On those computers, police said they found child pornography, including videos Doll had secretly filmed of his accuser when she was 15.

Doll came under investigation in 2017 after the girl reported he had touched her inappropriately and had tried to coax her into watching pornography with him that involved “girls who appeared to be very young,” Musmanno noted.

Doll pleaded guilty to charges including possession of child porn, aggravated indecent assault of a minor, illegal intercept of communications and corruption of minors last October. A Franklin County judge sentenced him to 14 to 61 years in prison in December.

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White House staff, Secret Service eye virus with fear, anger

WASHINGTON — The West Wing is a ghost town. Staff members are scared of exposure. And the White House is now a treatment ward for not one — but two — COVID patients, including a president who has long taken the threat of the virus lightly.

President Donald Trump’s decision to return home from a military hospital despite his continued illness is putting new focus on the people around him who could be further exposed if he doesn’t abide by strict isolation protocols.

Throughout the pandemic, White House custodians, ushers, kitchen staff and members of the U.S. Secret Service have continued to show up for work in what is now a coronavirus hot spot, with more than a dozen known cases this week alone.

Trump, still contagious, has made clear that he has little intention of abiding by best containment practices.

As he arrived back at the White House on Monday evening, the president defiantly removed his face mask and stopped to pose on a balcony within feet of a White House photographer. He was seen inside moments later, surrounded by numerous people as he taped a video message urging Americans not to fear a virus that has killed more than 210,000 in the U.S. and 1 million worldwide.

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the White House was “taking every precaution necessary” to protect not just the first family but “every staff member working on the complex” consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and best practices. He added that physical access to the president would be significantly limited and appropriate protective gear worn by those near him.

Nonetheless, the mood within the White House remains somber, with staff fearful they may have been exposed to the virus. As they confront a new reality — a worksite