sell

Solano County legalized home food popups. But 6 months later, chefs still can’t sell

When Solano County approved a new California law that would legalize home-based kitchen operations in April, it seemed like Cheska Kistner’s plans to open a restaurant in her Benicia home would finally come to fruition. The measure, California’s AB 626, allows for what are known as microenterprise food businesses, which Alameda County also made inroads toward legalizing yesterday. But no Bay Area county has yet fully implemented the 2018 law, leaving entrepreneurs like Kistner in limbo.

Under AB 626, cooks can legally sell up to 30 meals a day or 60 per week from their homes when their counties opt in and they have received a permit; their annual gross sales are capped at $50,000. The law has only been implemented in one county so far, Riverside. In Alameda County, many home kitchen operations have proliferated during the pandemic without the option to get proper permitting, leading to the health department cracking down on some.

Solano County is one of the furthest along in the Bay Area, even though the coronavirus pandemic caused officials to delay in-home inspections and permitting until shelter-at-home orders are lifted. What many people thought would be a short delay has lasted six months – and counting.

For Kistner, a personal chef and caterer on and off for nearly 30 years, that means waiting to expand her business beyond the current small number of carry-out orders she makes for family, friends and clients. She would like to recreate the model of her Philippines restaurant, Bale Ku Café, which means “my house” in her local dialect and is operated out of a home. Her Asian fusion dishes — including japchae, with sweet potato noodles and ribeye steak, and ningnang manuk, a grilled chicken and rice dish — generally cost $25 and feed two to three people.

With

‘Dark kitchen’ chain works with local restaurants to sell over food delivery apps

The coronavirus has left many restaurants struggling as the pandemic forced them to temporarily close their doors and still has many operating at a lower capacity than normal.

Owners are looking for ways to bring in more revenue. Fast-casual Asian chain Wow Bao has one idea: open their restaurant inside an existing restaurant as a delivery-only “dark kitchen” eatery.

Wow Bao, which serves up steamed bao, potstickers, dumplings, rice and noodle bowls, announced on Wednesday that it has added 100 locations in just six months by partnering with other restaurants. Its food is offered via third-party delivery services like UberEats, Grubhub, DoorDash, Postmates and Caviar.

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UBER UBER TECHNOLOGIES INC. 36.78 +0.52 +1.43%
GRUB GRUBHUB INC 74.52 +0.99 +1.35%

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Geoff Alexander, president and CEO of Wow Bao, said the company came up with the partnership plan last November.

“Although we didn’t envision this initiative as a response to the COVID-19 crisis, we are proud to say our dark kitchen platform is assisting operators to help pay rent and employ staff in order to survive this difficult time,” Alexander said in a press release.

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Wow Bao isn’t the only “virtual restaurant” to take advantage of the proliferation of meal delivery services during the pandemic. Chuck E. Cheese has been selling pizza under the name Pasqually’s Pizza & Wings on Grubhub. An increasing number of eateries operate “ghost kitchens,” renting out kitchen space to other restaurants or adding other restaurant brands to its offerings for takeout and delivery only. And there are also “cloud kitchens,” which work exclusively with delivery

Royal Opera House to sell Hockney portrait in bid to survive pandemic



a person sitting in front of a building: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

The Royal Opera House is to sell a David Hockney portrait of its former chief Sir David Webster in a desperate bid to raise funds amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The painting will be auctioned at Christie’s this month and is expected to fetch between £11 million and £18 million, The Observer newspaper reports.

It depicts Sir David, who ran the opera house from 1945 to 1970, and was commissioned for the Covent Garden building in the 1970s.



a person sitting on a table: David Hockney's portrait of Sir David Webster it set to be auctioned at Christie's and should fetch between £11 million and £18 million in a bid to raise vital needed to survive the pandemic


© Provided by Daily Mail
David Hockney’s portrait of Sir David Webster it set to be auctioned at Christie’s and should fetch between £11 million and £18 million in a bid to raise vital needed to survive the pandemic



a couple of people that are standing in a wedding dress: Sir David Webster, who ran the Royal Opera House from 1945 to 1970, greets the Queen Mother as she arrives for a gala performance at the Royal Opera House, in Covent Garden, in 1963


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sir David Webster, who ran the Royal Opera House from 1945 to 1970, greets the Queen Mother as she arrives for a gala performance at the Royal Opera House, in Covent Garden, in 1963

‘This was a really tough call,’ Alex Beard, the ROH’s chief executive, told the Observer.

‘But we have to face the situation we are in and if we can remain viable and get through this, then we can get back to employing people in the future.

‘We are the biggest arts employer in the country and we knew we had to look at any assets we had.

‘And there is only really one of any note that stands out and that is this portrait.’

The sale is part of a four-pronged plan to protect the venue’s standing as the home of the Royal Ballet and of international opera in the face of the pandemic.

That strategy also includes staff redundancies and a major drive for donations, the paper said.

The Royal Opera House says the pandemic had an

House near graveyard in UK won’t sell, so town adds in bonus burial plot

Well, at least the neighbors will be quiet.

Realtors are reportedly struggling to sell a reasonably priced lodge in the United Kingdom due to its proximity to the local cemetery. So now, town officials have thrown in an added bonus for potential home buyers: a free grave.

The house is located next to the local cemetery and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.

The house is located next to the local cemetery and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.
(iStock)

The three-bedroom lodge is owned by the local council in the town of Malton, The Sun reports. The house is located next to the cemetery, and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.

In order to sweeten the deal for the house, local officials have decided to throw in a free plot at the cemetery to go along with the house, the news outlet reported.

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Malton Mayor Paul Emberley explained: “An opportunity arose earlier this year to sell the property when our tenant decided to move to another part of the town. Members subsequently made a decision to sell the asset as part of a wider investment program.”

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Aside from the free grave, the property also boasts a courtyard and an enclosed garden. It’s located on a gated avenue, too.

Money from the sale will reportedly be used to pay for improvements to the graveyard’s two chapels, along with the restoration of the cemetery gates and the widening of the access roads.

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While bonus gravesite are important, there are several other things potential home buyers should also consider. Family Handyman previously reported that prospective buyers often forget