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Readers send in and share photos of Halloween decor

Steve Stephens
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

With many of us having more time to haunt our own homes this year during the pandemic, fans of Halloween have had the opportunity to create some inventive and fun holiday scenes. But what fun is haunting if there’s no one to haunt? 

To spread their holiday “spirit,” several Dispatch readers have agreed to share their Halloween fun this season.

Carroll Bowman and her husband Joe, both in their early 70s, have lived on their horse farm between Gahanna and New Albany for nearly 40 years.

But only in the past few years has a spooky (or amusing, depending on your point of view) skeletal horse and rider been haunting the property.

And since the display is on a horse farm, the obvious question ensues.

“One woman, with her mother and daughter, pulled up and asked to take pictures,” Carroll Bowman recalled.

“She asked, ‘Is that really a horse’s skeleton?’ ”

Bowman responded by activating the sensor that makes the horse whinny and its eyes glow, she said.

Whether that answered the visitor’s question is unclear, but just FYI, the boney horse is plastic.

A passion for collec

Artist Cindy McGuire of Marion takes her teddy bear art to many art shows. While there, she has picked up some interesting holiday decor items, some old, some new, she said.

“Doing shows all over the U.S. and the world, you see those great pieces,” she said.

“And our house is a 1910 brick four-square; it’s a great place to display things,” said McGuire, 66.

“I love that flavor, mixing old and new together.

“I’m not a dedicated Halloween collector, but I collect seasonal things, and I like decorating for the season,” she said.

All hail to the Hales

The Hale family of Westerville has only

House approves legislation to send cybersecurity resources to state, local governments

The House on Wednesday unanimously approved legislation that would send cybersecurity resources to state and local governments, which have been increasingly targeted by hackers during the past two years. 

The State and Local Cybersecurity Improvement Act, which has bipartisan support, would create a $400 million grant program at the Department of Homeland Security to provide financial resources for state and local governments to defend against and respond to cyberattacks. 

The bill would also require DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) to develop a strategy to shore up the cybersecurity of state, local, territorial and tribal governments. 

The bill now moves to the Senate, where timing on a vote is unclear. 

The legislation is sponsored by Reps. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondCindy McCain joins board of Biden’s presidential transition team Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Underwood takes over as chair of House cybersecurity panel MORE (D-La.) and Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodWomen of color flex political might Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Underwood takes over as chair of House cybersecurity panel MORE (D-Ill.), the former and current chairs respectively of the House Homeland Security Committee’s cybersecurity subcommittee,  and John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Lawmakers introduce legislation to boost cybersecurity of local governments, small businesses Underwood takes over as chair of House cybersecurity panel MORE (R-N.Y.), the ranking member of the subcommittee.

Other sponsors include House Homeland Security Chairman