Set

Popular West Palm eatery Kitchen set to open second location at Alton Town Center



a man and a woman standing in a room: Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]


© [LILA PHOTO]
Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]

PALM BEACH GARDENS — Seven years after opening their popular American brasserie Kitchen in West Palm Beach, Chef Matthew Byrne and his wife, Aliza, are preparing to debut the sequel. 

The West Palm Beach residents will unveil their second Kitchen restaurant early next month at Alton Town Center in Palm Beach Gardens.

The eatery, which will seat 150 with ample outdoor space and a private room, joins a growing list of new restaurants at the 360,203-square-foot retail complex on Donald Ross Road.

More: Gardens McDonald’s reopens dining room after $450,000 contemporary renovation

More: Miller’s Ale House to open next year at Alton Town Center in Gardens

The location was a perfect one for the Byrnes, who were eager to expand into an area where many of their regular customers live, including nearby Jupiter.

“It’s such an amazing community there,” said Aliza Byrne, who has grown familiar with the area since her teenage sons began attending The Benjamin School. “A lot of our clients live nearby. There was such a huge demand from people who said they wished we were closer. We feel really good about it.”

Byrne said she expects to draw more year-round diners to the new Alton Town Center location, whereas the original Kitchen, at 319 Belvedere Rd., is more seasonal.

That restaurant, which has drawn a steady stream of locals and visiting VIPs since it first opened in October 2013, seated just 36 people initially and served only beer, wine and champagne for the first three years.

The Alton Town Center restaurant will have a ‘proper’ bar, Byrne said, which will allow for a bar menu and happy hour.

“We were never able to have

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Fundraiser set up for mother struck, seriously injured near Boston Public Garden



a car parked on a city street: A crashed truck, at Boylston and Charles streets, was involved in a serious accident, next to the Boston Public Garden.


© Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff
A crashed truck, at Boylston and Charles streets, was involved in a serious accident, next to the Boston Public Garden.

An online fundraiser has been set up for the woman injured when an allegedly stolen truck crashed near the Boston Public Garden last week.

Kamila Guimaraes had been married for just a few weeks when she was injured. She’s also the mother of a 9-year-old son, according to the GoFundMe page.

The money will go to help her pay for rent and other expenses as she recovers, the page says, noting that she may be out of work for sometime, and could remain hospitalized “for a while.” It says she’s in critical condition.

As of Thursday afternoon, the fundraiser had brought in over $16,700 of a $100,000 goal.

The crash happened around 4:23 p.m. last Thursday, Boston police said in a press release. Keith Andrade, 58, of Boston, was later arrested and charged in connection with the incident.

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Susan Collins: Trump didn’t set a ‘good example’ by taking mask off at White House

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMurkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Susan Collins: Punting coronavirus relief until after election a ‘huge mistake’ Biden leads Trump by 11 points in Maine: survey MORE (R-Maine) said President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE, who is currently infected with COVID-19, didn’t set a “good example” when he took off his mask outside of the White House earlier this week, shortly after leaving Walter Reed hospital.

“When I saw him on the balcony of the White House, taking off his mask, I couldn’t help but think that he sent the wrong signal, given that he’s infected with COVID-19 and that there are many people in his immediate circle who have the virus,” Collins told The Associated Press. “I did not think that was a good example at all.” 

Collins, who is fighting for her political life as she tries to hold onto her Senate seat, has previously been critical of the president’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, saying earlier this year that it had been “extremely uneven” and that he “should have been straightforward” about the seriousness of the disease. 

Trump was spotted taking off his mask on Monday as he posed for photos from the balcony above the South Lawn. After landing in Marine One, Trump walked up the stairs of the South Portico, removed his mask and looked over the balcony.

The president was near an official photographer, and other staffers could be seen behind him. He did not put his mask back on as he turned to walk back into the White House.

Trump went

Maskless Trump set a poor example at White House

BANGOR, Maine (AP) — Republican Sen. Susan Collins said Tuesday she was “shocked” to see President Donald Trump discharged from the hospital so soon, and said Trump set a poor example by appearing at the White House without a mask.



Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Waterville, Maine. Collins, who is seeking re-election, visited businesses on a campaign swing through downtown Waterville. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)


© Provided by Associated Press
Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Waterville, Maine. Collins, who is seeking re-election, visited businesses on a campaign swing through downtown Waterville. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

“When I saw him on the balcony of the White House, taking off his mask, I couldn’t help but think that he sent the wrong signal, given that he’s infected with COVID-19 and that there are many people in his immediate circle who have the virus,” she said. “I did not think that was a good example at all.”

The White House is now a coronavirus hotspot, with both the president and first lady having contracted the virus, along with others in their inner circle.

Collins, who has been critical of Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic before, calling his performance “extremely uneven.”

She’s running against Democrat Sara Gideon, the Maine House speaker, in one of the most competitive senate races in the country — one of a handful that could decide whether Republicans keep control of the U.S. Senate. It’s the costliest political race in state history.

Collins is seeking to persuade voters who oppose Trump to stick with her. Collins has not said whether or not she’ll cast her ballot for the president. She says she didn’t vote for him in 2016.

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