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Readers send in and share photos of Halloween decor

Steve Stephens
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

With many of us having more time to haunt our own homes this year during the pandemic, fans of Halloween have had the opportunity to create some inventive and fun holiday scenes. But what fun is haunting if there’s no one to haunt? 

To spread their holiday “spirit,” several Dispatch readers have agreed to share their Halloween fun this season.

Carroll Bowman and her husband Joe, both in their early 70s, have lived on their horse farm between Gahanna and New Albany for nearly 40 years.

But only in the past few years has a spooky (or amusing, depending on your point of view) skeletal horse and rider been haunting the property.

And since the display is on a horse farm, the obvious question ensues.

“One woman, with her mother and daughter, pulled up and asked to take pictures,” Carroll Bowman recalled.

“She asked, ‘Is that really a horse’s skeleton?’ ”

Bowman responded by activating the sensor that makes the horse whinny and its eyes glow, she said.

Whether that answered the visitor’s question is unclear, but just FYI, the boney horse is plastic.

A passion for collec

Artist Cindy McGuire of Marion takes her teddy bear art to many art shows. While there, she has picked up some interesting holiday decor items, some old, some new, she said.

“Doing shows all over the U.S. and the world, you see those great pieces,” she said.

“And our house is a 1910 brick four-square; it’s a great place to display things,” said McGuire, 66.

“I love that flavor, mixing old and new together.

“I’m not a dedicated Halloween collector, but I collect seasonal things, and I like decorating for the season,” she said.

All hail to the Hales

The Hale family of Westerville has only

Meet Me @ The Altar share “Garden,” become your new favorite pop-punk band

Who had Paramore down as the most influential band of their generation? Fifteen years on from the release of their debut album All We Know Is Falling, teenagers are still picking up guitars, getting in their feelings, and trying to emulate the Tennessee pop-punks. Not least the members of Meet Me @ The Altar — 19-year-old guitarist Téa Campbell, 21-year-old drummer Ada Juarez, and 19-year-old vocalist Edith Johnson — who all would have been infants when “Pressure” was making its way around torrent sites. Now they’re announcing that they’ve signed to emo bastion Fueled By Ramen, releasing a hugely satisfying new single called “Garden,” and setting themselves up as one of the most exciting young pop bands in the United States.

“Garden,” the video for which is premiering at the foot of the page, is a throwback in every sense: half-pace arpeggiated riffs, a massive chorus, chugging breakdowns thrown in so kids can let loose at a show (some day). Even the saturation on the video seems to have been ripped from an early-aughts MTV 2 marathon. The main difference here — other than the fact that Meet Me @ The Altar is comprised of three women of color, two of whom are gay — is that Campbell, Juarez, and Johnson bring a contagious energy to things. They clearly fucking love what they do. I’m a particular fan of Campbell, who can rip through riffs and trills with virtuosic abandon, but best of all looks shocked and overjoyed every time she does something complex or watches her bandmates do something cool. I’ve listened to this song every day for two weeks and woken up with it in my head just about every morning. It’s been great.

“’Garden’ is about being there for the people in your life who need

You Can Grow It: Our viewers share their garden harvests

Jim Duthie shares garden photos that were posted on the You Can Grow It Facebook group page.

BOISE, Idaho — Did you grow a garden this year? Many of you have been growing fruits, flowers and vegetables for years, while some of you are just learning the joy of gardening for the first time.

As the gardening season starts to draw to a close for the year, our garden master Jim Duthie is once again sharing some garden pictures that some of you have posted on the ‘You Can Grow It’ Facebook group page. Take a look.

Fall is here and most of us gardeners are busy harvesting and preserving our fruits and vegetables, and enjoying the last flower blooms of the season. It won’t be long before frosty weather puts an end to our outdoor gardening for the year. And while many of you are veteran gardeners, some of you developed a green thumb for the very first time. So let’s take a look at some harvest successes that some of our fellow gardeners have had this season.

It seems like a lot of you grew decorative gourds and pumpkins. Take a look at Lorna Huff’s harvest. She has quite an assortment of traditional Jack-o-lantern pumpkins, as well as a variety known as white ghost pumpkins. And how about those creepy looking warty and bumpy pumpkins, sometimes called knuckleheads, or super freaks. It looks like it going to be a fun Halloween at Lorna’s house.

And here are a couple of pictures that Suzy Erickson posted of her harvest of small gourds, mini-pumpkins and pattypan squash. Did you know that there are more than a hundred different kinds of squash, gourds and pumpkins that you can grow in your garden?

Speaking of squash, butternuts are one of the most

Global Wall Decor Market 2020 Industry Outlook, Present Scenario of Manufacturers, Share, Size, Opportunities and Forecast to 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 29, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
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Scope of the Global Wall Decor Industry:

The market report provides an assessment of future trends and future changes in the global Wall Decor market. The report presents an assessment of the market and contains a future trend, current growth factors, attentive opinions, facts, historical information, and market information. For the development of this report, researchers analyzed data using different formulas and analytical tools and prepared the surveyed data and predictions of key participants using diagrams, graphs, and statistics. Key players operating in the market are outlined by encompassing their geographic reach, financial performance, strategic moves, product portfolio, and their strategic moves.

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The market can be divided

In a new podcast, Boston’s Brazilian house cleaners share stories ‘swept under the rug’

Heloiza Barbosa in the studio to record a recent episode of the "Faxina" podcast.
Heloiza Barbosa in the studio to record a recent episode of the “Faxina” podcast.Courtesy Faxina Podcast

In the 1990s, Brazil native Heloiza Barbosa was working toward her doctorate in education at Boston University when she took a job as a housekeeper on Martha’s Vineyard. One evening, her employer offered extra hours working a special event. Barbosa arrived to find the guest of honor was Salman Rushdie. “I read his work!” Barbosa told the owner. “Shhhh! Don’t Speak! Work!” was the response. In March 2020, this was the first of many stories featured on the “Faxina” podcast. The show, created and hosted by Barbosa, is focused on the experiences of Boston-area Brazilian house cleaners. Reached via phone at her home in Brookline, Barbosa spoke about the podcast’s origins and its multilingual reach.

Q. What motivated you to start a podcast?

A. About two years ago I was thinking about publishing a collection of short stories I was writing in Portuguese. Beyond the book, I intended to interview a former professor of mine who was a victim of torture during Brazil’s military dictatorship [1964-85]. So when I went to see her in my hometown of Belém, I began to chat with anyone in the street out of a sense of nostalgia. I was shocked by how unaware people were of Brazil’s recent history, especially young people. The youth did not even believe there was ever a military dictatorship. That helped in the election of [Jair] Bolsonaro, a man who once paid homage to a torturer from the military era in the halls of [Brazil’s] congress.

When Bolsonaro was elected I moved away from the book idea. Not everyone in Brazil has access to them; they’re very expensive there. So that’s when I decided to do a podcast because it’s a format