stand

Here’s The Interior That Acura Hopes Will Help The New MDX Stand Out

We’ve got new generations of the Mercedes-Benz GLS, Mercedes GLA, Nissan Rogue and Ford Explorer, in addition to entirely new cars like the Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Genesis GV80 and Ford Bronco, so a new fourth-generation Acura MDX arrives in the face of plentiful competition. I’m probably forgetting a lot of others! Sheesh, do automakers ever know where the money is.



a close up of a car


© Photo: Acura


This blog, specifically, is about the MDX, new photos of which Acura released this week. The images show an updated interior for a vehicle that Acura says is intended to be its flagship. The 2021 MDX prototype — what the production version will look like more or less — will debut in full next week. But with the interior photos we get a glimpse of Acura’s next play in a very, very crowded marketplace, where every automaker seems determined to show off their newest Sunday best.

The MDX’s competitors are cars like the BMW X5, Audi Q7, Infiniti QX60 and Mercedes GLE, two of which — the X5 and GLE — were also updated in the past couple of years. You’d almost think that automakers know what really sells in the American marketplace.

Acura sold 52,019 MDXs last year, a 1 percent improvement over 2018. And while that number will probably shrink for 2020 because of (gestures to everything), it will probably still sell enough to be Acura’s second biggest seller in the U.S., behind the RDX, its little brother, as it was last year. The MDX will also get, as is necessary, some new interior tech that you will instantly forget:

Signature Acura technologies debuting in the new MDX Prototype will include the Acura Precision Cockpit™ all-digital driver’s meter, an ultra-wide full-HD center display and a next-level, 25-speaker “Signature Edition” ELS Studio 3D® premium audio system

Carolyn Hax: If you can’t stand the eats, get in the kitchen

This weekend, he criticized my cooking to other people, then he complained his dinner wasn’t ready and stormed out to a drive-through. I was literally pulling a meal out of the oven for him, not me, when he left.

I think it’s time for me to stop cooking for him. Do I just stop? After 25 years? This is not the only lopsided deal I signed up for.

Anonymous: Which 50s are you in?

Yes, you stop. And, yes, Triscuits, cheese and wine are dinner.

If by “just” stop you mean quit without comment, then I’d advise against that; your husband’s recent foray into public shaming and tantrums notwithstanding, you two are in a marriage and owe each other mature status reports and chances to respond. If the point is to be punitive then you have bigger problems than dinner.

Don’t speak up to ask or justify, but only to say what you’re planning and why, so he knows how you feel and what to expect.

If this triggers more outburst cheeseburgers, then replay his stance for him calmly when he’s back: “You seem to want me to keep making a dinner I don’t want to cook or eat anymore. Yes, no? Please explain.”

Everyone’s entitled to ask for unreasonable things (it’s just asking, after all), but we don’t have to let anyone get away with using implication or coded language or euphemism or emotional outbursts to spin them. We’re entitled to have things spelled out for us before we respond to them. So hold out for his true reasoning.

And while we’re here: He is also entitled to make his case that your “deal” isn’t lopsided, if that’s what he believes, and that dinner isn’t just about food.

To be clear, this is all just about the communication part;