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Interior Secretary’s View: ‘Made in America’ starts with Minnesota mining

Failed policies from previous administrations undercut the American manufacturing and mining industries, putting Americans out of work and China in the driver’s seat to control the products we rely on every day for electric power, communications, internet connectivity, and national security. President Donald Trump has championed policies to bring these jobs back to the United States, and his administration is continuing to take major steps forward to ensure our rightful place in the mining, processing, and manufacturing of critical minerals.

Following President Trump’s Executive Order 13817 in 2017, the Department of the Interior produced a list of 35 minerals — including rare earth elements and other metals such as lithium, indium, tellurium, gallium, and platinum-group metals — and determined that the supply chains for these critical minerals are vital to our nation’s national security and economic vitality.

The United States used to be the leader in mineral production and processing. Now, for 31 of 35 critical minerals, the United States imports over half of its annual consumption with no domestic production at all for 14 critical minerals. Everything from solar panels to smartphones to medical devices to the military equipment our soldiers need to protect our nation require these critical minerals. For many of these minerals, China largely controls the market for mining, processing, and manufacturing.

President Trump signed an executive order and declared a national emergency on Sept. 30 to expand the domestic mining industry. Critical minerals can and should be sourced from the United States by American workers, and the Trump administration is making sure this happens. The Department of the Interior and the rest of the federal government have been directed by the president to take bold action to support the mining and processing of minerals here at home.

Through his executive order, President Trump has taken

TMC Starts ‘Mamata’s Kitchen’ Scheme to Provide Migrant Workers Meals for Rs 5

Kolkata: With an aim to support lakhs of migrant workers who have suffered a massive financial setback due to job losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Trinamool Congress has started a community kitchen under the name, ‘Didir Rannaghar (Mamata’s kitchen)’.

At ‘Didir Rannaghar’, a meal would cost as little as Rs 5 during the Durga Puja period. The kitchen will be functional every day between 11 am and 3 pm, and the menu (which will change every day) will be mostly vegetarian and include rice, dal (pulses), mix vegetable, ‘shukto’ (vegetable stew) soyabean, ‘Khichdi’ (cooked rice and lentils), papad.

As Bengal prepares itself for “measured” Durga Puja celebrations this year amid social distancing, the kitchen initiative by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee in association with various party clubs is likely to bring smiles on lakhs of people who are struggling to find even one square meal a day.

These kitchens have already started functioning in Howrah district, Belgachhia (in Kolkata) and Barrackpore in North 24-Parganas district. The TMC also plans to run similar kitchens across the state for the duration of the festive season.

Speaking to the News18, TMC MLA Tapas Roy said, “Under the leadership of Mamata Banerjee, we have decided to stand beside the people, primarily those belonging to the underprivileged sections/unorganised sectors as they have suffered a lot due to the pandemic situation. We are hopeful that ‘Didir Rannaghar’ will benefit them immensely.”

“Apart from cooked food, we are planning to donate clothes to the poor so they can wear new clothes during the festive seasons. ‘Didir Rannaghar’ is a pledge undertaken by the TMC to support those who are battling to feed their family members due to job loss.”

A special attention will be paid to hygiene in these kitchens and to make them popular, several posters

Annual NARI Home & Remodeling Show starts Oct. 16 at State Fair Park

The annual NARI Home & Remodeling Show will be slightly smaller this year as the coronavirus pandemic keeps more people at home and interested in making improvements. 



a person standing in front of a building: Trent Kosik from Window Select in Menomonee Falls paints the doors of a 'She Shed' that will be on display at the Nari Milwaukee Spring Home Improvement Show at Wisconsin State Fair Park this weekend.


© Angela Peterson/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Trent Kosik from Window Select in Menomonee Falls paints the doors of a ‘She Shed’ that will be on display at the Nari Milwaukee Spring Home Improvement Show at Wisconsin State Fair Park this weekend.

NARI Milwaukee is hosting its home and remodeling show Oct. 16-18 at State Fair Park. 

Around 70 NARI Milwaukee members will host exhibit booths. Last year, more than 100 members staffed exhibit booths. The home and remodeling show has exhibitors for all types of remodeling and home improvement products and services. 

Get daily updates on the Packers during the season.

“We’re excited to connect homeowners who are eager to get their home improvements underway with local contractors. By hosting a safe and accessible show, we’re helping reopen the economy and support area small businesses,” said Diane Welhouse, executive director of NARI Milwaukee, in a news release. “Nearly 80% of our members are small businesses with fewer than 10 employees so the annual show is important to them.” 

With people staying at home more during the pandemic, NARI members have said that business is good even though some segments of the economy are seeing significant declines as a result of COVID’s effect on business.  

“Today’s home is working overtime as adults and children are using it as their restaurant, office, classroom, entertainment spot and vacation destination,” Welhouse said in the release. “NARI Milwaukee members report many homeowners are looking to improve, repurpose and expand their space due to these increased demands.” 

Changes if you plan on attending

The show will have a limited capacity with one-way aisles to enforce social distancing. All exhibitors