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Are Robust Financials Driving The Recent Rally In Floor & Decor Holdings, Inc.’s (NYSE:FND) Stock?

Most readers would already be aware that Floor & Decor Holdings’ (NYSE:FND) stock increased significantly by 30% over the past three months. Given the company’s impressive performance, we decided to study its financial indicators more closely as a company’s financial health over the long-term usually dictates market outcomes. Specifically, we decided to study Floor & Decor Holdings’ ROE in this article.

Return on equity or ROE is an important factor to be considered by a shareholder because it tells them how effectively their capital is being reinvested. In short, ROE shows the profit each dollar generates with respect to its shareholder investments.

View our latest analysis for Floor & Decor Holdings

How To Calculate Return On Equity?

Return on equity can be calculated by using the formula:

Return on Equity = Net Profit (from continuing operations) ÷ Shareholders’ Equity

So, based on the above formula, the ROE for Floor & Decor Holdings is:

17% = US$145m ÷ US$850m (Based on the trailing twelve months to June 2020).

The ‘return’ refers to a company’s earnings over the last year. Another way to think of that is that for every $1 worth of equity, the company was able to earn $0.17 in profit.

What Is The Relationship Between ROE And Earnings Growth?

Thus far, we have learned that ROE measures how efficiently a company is generating its profits. Depending on how much of these profits the company reinvests or “retains”, and how effectively it does so, we are then able to assess a company’s earnings growth potential. Generally speaking, other things being equal, firms with a high return on equity and profit retention, have a higher growth rate than firms that don’t share these attributes.

Floor & Decor Holdings’ Earnings Growth And 17% ROE

At first glance, Floor & Decor Holdings seems

Stock recover on signs of improving Trump’s health

MILAN (Reuters) – Stocks and other risk assets rose on Monday as signs that Donald Trump’s health was improving brought relief to markets after the uncertainty of his COVID-19 infection sent investors rushing for safety last week.

FILE PHOTO: The New York Stock Exchange is pictured in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

The U.S. President, 74, was flown to a hospital for treatment on Friday, but his doctors said he had responded well and could return to the White House as soon as on Monday.

The MSCI world equity index, which tracks shares in 49 countries, was up 0.4% by 0812 GMT, supported by overnight gains across Asia and a positive start in Europe.

The pan-European STOXX 600 .STOXX rose 0.7%. S&P 500 futures EScv1 rose 0.5% and Nasdaq futures NQc1 0.8%, indicating a similarly strong start on Wall Street later.

Overhanging the relief rally, however, were concerns that Trump’s case could be more severe than public disclosures suggest, and that more restrictive measures by governments to slow coronavirus infections could harm the economic recovery.

Some traders were concerned by doctors’ admission that Trump had been given supplementary oxygen and steroids.

“Many questions remain including the use of the steroid drug … which is usually reserved for those with severe illness,” said Raymond James strategist Chris Bailey in London. “Global cases now top 35 million and various new restrictions in Paris, New York, etc”,

A survey on Monday showed the euro zone’s economic recovery faltered last month as new restrictions sent its dominant service sector into reverse.

IHS Markit’s final composite Purchasing Managers’ Index fell to 50.4, just above the 50 mark separating growth from contraction.

Trump’s infection also comes less than one month before the presidential election on

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Forget Coca-Cola, Home Depot Is a Better Dividend Stock

Finding a good dividend involves more than just screening for high yields and long track records of annual payout raises. Many blue chip businesses would show up in that search, but only a few of these stocks will end up generating the type of market-thumping returns that income investors are reaching for.

That fact shines through when stacking up two Dow giants, Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) and Home Depot (NYSE:HD). While the beverage titan has plenty of attractive investment qualities, Home Depot looks like the better dividend stock right now.

A couple shopping for appliances.

Image source: Getty Images.

More ammunition

Sure, Coca-Cola pays a higher yield today, at over 3% compared with Home Depot’s 2%. But that gap is mainly due to investors’ judgments about the two companies diverging growth outlooks. Consumers are more focused on home improvements thanks to pandemic-related changes to shopping and work habits. These shifts have moved against Coke by severely limiting people’s mobility and densely attended events like concerts and sports.

Those limitations won’t last forever (Coke believes a full recovery might take less than two years). Yet it still seems likely that Home Depot will have more resources it can direct toward dividend boosts at least through 2021. The company last reported double-digit gains in both customer traffic and average spending per visit on the way to adding $8 billion of additional revenue to its sales base. Coke, in contrast, saw sales volumes drop 16% in the most recent quarter .

Dividend qualities

Home Depot was a more generous dividend payer even before the pandemic began supporting its finances in early 2020. Its last annual hike was 10%, compared with Coke’s 2.5%. Home Depot also targets returning over 50% of yearly earnings to shareholders as dividends. Rival Lowes (NYSE:LOW), on the other hand, targets a payout

Will a Housing Market Crash Affect Home Depot Stock?

Will the housing market crash again? Maybe. Many aspects of the economy are cyclical, and housing prices do occasionally fall. Is a housing crash imminent? That’s harder to answer.

Some have sounded the alarm on housing for good reason. Consider the famous Case-Shiller Home Price Index, an inflation-adjusted metric created by Standard & Poor’s tracking housing prices. The index’s value was 100 back in the year 2000 and had been close to 100 when applying the index’s criteria backward to the 20th century. But since 2000, it has risen above 180 on two occasions. The first time preceded the housing crash of the Great Recession.

The second time the Case-Shiller index exceeded 180 is right now. In reality, it passed the mark way back in 2016, and it’s currently around 215. So no need to panic: Crossing 180 doesn’t immediately flip a housing-crash switch. It just shows housing prices have gone up a lot. The bigger problem, though, is how much faster home values are growing relative to average income. Consider the data over just the last 10 years.

Case-Shiller Home Price Index: National Chart

Data by YCharts.

It’s probably unsustainable for home values to outpace personal income long term. Eventually people could be priced out of affordable housing, and that could spark a housing market correction. Will that affect companies like Home Depot (NYSE:HD)?

To answer that, we can start by going back to the Great Recession. 

A model house sits atop Jenga blocks while a businessman removes a piece, creating instability.

Image source: Getty Images.

The last time Home Depot’s revenue fell

Home Depot’s revenue fell from 2007 to 2009. In fiscal 2006, when things were going well, the company generated $90.8 billion in full-year net sales. In fiscal 2009, it generated just $66.2 billion — down 27% over three years. Likewise, net earnings took a hit as the company lost operating leverage from lower sales per location.