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A Garden Center’s Worth of Trees and Bushes Have Transformed the Street Outside Old Town Brewing Into a Green Escape

In most instances when you run up against one of those white- and safety-orange-striped “Road Closed” barricades, heavy equipment is on the other side ripping into the pavement, frustrating drivers now in need of another route along with neighbors who must put up with the sustained din of construction.

At Old Town Brewing’s Northeast Portland location, these blockades actually seal off a tranquil urban thicket right in the middle of the street.

This past summer saw every bar, brewery and restaurant in town expand into lanes of traffic if they had the means and ability. While many of these makeshift pandemic patios are nothing much to look at, Old Town’s is different: It immerses you in nature.

“I think one of the things that made such a drastic improvement were all of the trees,” says owner Adam Milne. “It made Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard look like a park. It’s beautiful.”

The temporary woodland—just off the major thoroughfare on Northeast Sumner Street—took more to create than just a run to the closest big-box store’s garden department. The trees are actually loaners from the city of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services as part of its effort to partner with the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Healthy Business program. And the agency didn’t just pick whatever extra available shrubs happened to be in storage, either—careful planning went into the selection of each flower and frond for Old Town and the newly launched Dream Street Plaza it’s a part of.

“They sent out an arborist who walked through the place to develop a ‘tree site plan’ to help support the goals of the plaza,” says PBOT spokesperson Hannah Schafer.

The plaza, which had its grand opening Oct. 2, is the result of a $25,000 National Association of City Transportation Officials grant that PBOT won

Meet the woman who runs Dayton’s 2nd Street Market, ‘the warm and inviting kitchen for Dayton’

Lynda Suda manages one of the city’s favorite places to spend time — Five Rivers MetroPark’s 2nd Street Market.



a woman wearing a hat: Lynda Suda is manager of Five River's MetroParks 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO


© Provided by Dayton Daily News
Lynda Suda is manager of Five River’s MetroParks 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The pandemic has altered normal operations, but the venue is holding outdoor-only markets each Saturday with plans to continue through October.

“The market is an inclusive place where people can be themselves, relax and get to know the people who grow, raise and prepare their food,” Suda said.

If you haven’t visited the market, our Daytonian of the Week will tell you why this downtown Dayton gem is special.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Lynda Suda is the manager of Five Rivers MetroPark's 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED


© Provided by Dayton Daily News
Lynda Suda is the manager of Five Rivers MetroPark’s 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED

Tell us about your background. What has led you to this point in your career?

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I was born and raised in Spokane, Wash. After spending a few years in both Philadelphia, PA and Denver, CO, my husband Marc and I moved our family to Dayton 16 years ago this month. We enjoyed raising our two sons, Tyme and Zhen, and helping Marc’s ailing mother in the same neighborhood Marc grew up in, Five Oaks.

My work background has mostly been connected to small, family owned retail businesses. Prior to moving to Dayton, most of that experience was artisan jewelry related, but when I moved to Dayton, I was able to combine my retail experience with my interest in health and wellness. The first opportunity to do so, came when I started working at and eventually managing a local health food store. After being there ten years, as the owner put it, “it was time for a change”. I went back to school, finishing my liberal studies degree at Antioch Midwest University with

Takeout Thai from Houston’s Street to Kitchen

As this coronavirus crisis continues, we continue to support our local restaurant industry any way we can, including by ordering takeout.

Over in the East End just off Harrisburg sits a takeout spot you’ll want to get to know asap, the sizzling new Thai concept Street to Kitchen. It comes from Thai native and chef Benchawan “G” Jabthong Painter — whose prior work in the kitchens at SaltAir and Theodore Rex put her name on the culinary map — and her husband Graham; and though it’s only had about two-plus months under its belt and it opened in the middle of a pandemic, it has quickly garnered fans across the city.

Consider this writer one of them. I’d been following its Instagram account and it was already on my hit list before I realized I needed to get out of my Friday night pizza or ramen rut (don’t worry Romano’s and Ramen Tatsu-Ya, I’ll be back). So on a recent, rainy Friday, my husband and I finally decided to check it out.

You can pick up chef Benchawan “G” Jabthong Painter's real deal Thai eats straight from the drive-through window.EXPAND

You can pick up chef Benchawan “G” Jabthong Painter’s real deal Thai eats straight from the drive-through window.

Photo by Kirsten Gilliam

The restaurant’s operations are currently takeout and delivery only (with plans to open a dining space in the future), so you can order online and pick up the goods through a drive-through window or get delivery via UberEats and DoorDash. Note: if you order via the DoorDash delivery directly through Street to Kitchen’s website and not from the app itself, it helps the restaurant avoid the large commissions typically charged by delivery services.

We ordered delivery, and around an hour later the eats arrived well packed and still hot. Veggie spring rolls ($5 for four), teeny numbers packed with cabbage, carrots, shiitake mushrooms

Inside the Japanese retreat at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra

Behind the unique front of this 1950s home lies a spectacular ‘Japanese retreat’ – complete with a dreamy bathroom sanctuary, modern decor and an airy open plan living area perfect for entertaining

  • An architect has created an epic oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street
  • The one-of-a-kind home at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham was inspired by Japanese interior design
  • Made from Australian-sourced recycled materials, it has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a four-car garage
  • Standout features include a bath clad in Tasmanian oak and a grass-watering system controlled from an app
  • The outdoor deck is made out of timber salvaged from a basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport
  • So unique is the design that the home is nominated for the 2020 Master Builders Association Housing Awards

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An architect has transformed a 1950s brick cottage into a unique oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street.

Redesigned in collaboration between construction firm MegaFlora and architect Blake O’Neill, the one-of-a-kind two-storey at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham, in the capital’s leafy north, was inspired by the owners’ love of Japanese interiors which are simple but always of the highest quality craftsmanship.

Built from recycled materials sourced across New South Wales and the ACT, the four-bedroom house – which took three years to complete – has sustainability etched into every corner.

The outdoor entertainment deck is made out of timber salvaged from an old basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport, while a whopping 680 metres of repurposed hardwood battens run along the ceiling alone.

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The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra,