Sukkot

House calls bring Jewish tradition of Sukkot to the isolated

NEW YORK (AP) — Sukkot, the weeklong Jewish fall holiday commemorating God’s miraculous protection of the Jewish people in the desert, looks different this year.



Holocaust survivor Leon Sherman holds a lulav, a collection of palm, myrtle and willow branches, and an etrog, a citrus fruit, as he recites the blessings in front of his home in the Queens borough of New York, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. In an effort to bring the Jewish fall harvest traditions safely to those isolated by the coronavirus, Rabbi Eli Blokh, of the Chabad of Rego Park Jewish and Russian Community Center, built a mobile sukkah, a temporary shelter where Jews gather to celebrate Sukkot, in the back of a red pickup, making several house calls each day during the weeklong festival to people like Sherman. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)


© Provided by Associated Press
Holocaust survivor Leon Sherman holds a lulav, a collection of palm, myrtle and willow branches, and an etrog, a citrus fruit, as he recites the blessings in front of his home in the Queens borough of New York, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. In an effort to bring the Jewish fall harvest traditions safely to those isolated by the coronavirus, Rabbi Eli Blokh, of the Chabad of Rego Park Jewish and Russian Community Center, built a mobile sukkah, a temporary shelter where Jews gather to celebrate Sukkot, in the back of a red pickup, making several house calls each day during the weeklong festival to people like Sherman. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

Many vulnerable individuals remain isolated at home due to the coronavirus during a celebration meant to highlight unity in the sukkah, the temporary shelter where Sukkot is observed for seven days and nights.



Rabbi Eli Blokh, of the Chabad of Rego Park Jewish and Russian Community Center, second from left, stands in the bed of a truck under his mobile sukkah as he recites the blessings over the lulav with Evgenia Alperovich, second from right, in the Queens borough of New York, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. Blokh, his two sons and two rabbinical students began making house calls on Monday in an effort to bring the Jewish fall harvest festival safely to those isolated by the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)


© Provided by Associated Press
Rabbi Eli Blokh, of the Chabad of Rego Park Jewish and Russian Community Center, second from left, stands in the bed of a truck under his mobile sukkah as he recites the blessings over the lulav with Evgenia Alperovich, second from right, in the Queens borough of New York, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. Blokh, his two sons and two rabbinical students began making house calls on Monday in an effort to bring the Jewish fall harvest festival safely to those isolated by the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

To bring the joy and tradition to them, Rabbi Eli Blokh, director of the Chabad of Rego Park Jewish and Russian Community Center in New York’s Queens borough, mounted a sukkah of three walls with