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All of the contradictions surrounding Trump’s COVID-19 infection

  • Since the news broke that President Donald Trump contracted COVID-19, accurate information about his illness has been hard to come by.
  • White House officials and the president’s doctors have not been straightforward about the Trump’s condition and the timeline of his diagnosis.
  • Here is a breakdown of their contradictions so far.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

News broke that President Donald Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus with a tweet he posted at 12:54 a.m. ET on Friday. In the days since, statements from the White House and Trump’s own physician have muddied the waters, and the public is still largely in the dark about the state of the president’s health.

Here is a breakdown of the contradictions and cover-ups surrounding Trump’s illness.

  • In an interview with Fox News on Thursday night, Trump told host Sean Hannity he had just learned that his adviser, Hope Hicks, tested positive for the virus. The White House has now acknowledged that at the time he spoke to Hannity, Trump had already tested positive himself on a rapid test and was awaiting results from a second test.
  • Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday afternoon, “out of an abundance of caution,” White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said at the time. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows later painted a dimmer picture of Trump’s health on Friday when he was hospitalized. “He had a fever and his blood oxygen level had dropped rapidly,” he told Fox News on Saturday evening.  
  • On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley told reporters that “yesterday and today” Trump had not been treated with supplemental oxygen. On Sunday, however, Conley disclosed that the president was indeed given oxygen: “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course

Two Republican senators test positive for COVID-19, adding to uncertainty surrounding Supreme Court pick

The coronavirus outbreak gripping the White House spread to Capitol Hill on Friday morning, raising the prospect that the virus could disrupt Republicans’ plans to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court before the November election.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Judge Amy Coney Barrett spoke after being nominated to the US Supreme Court by President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Several people who were in attendance, including the president, have since tested positive for COVID-19, imperiling Barrett's confirmation process.


© OLIVIER DOULIERY
Judge Amy Coney Barrett spoke after being nominated to the US Supreme Court by President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Several people who were in attendance, including the president, have since tested positive for COVID-19, imperiling Barrett’s confirmation process.

Two Republican members of the Senate Judiciary committee — Mike Lee of Utah, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina – revealed Friday that they have tested positive for the potentially deadly disease.

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Their positive diagnoses raised concerns that the virus had spread at a Saturday Rose Garden ceremony, at which Trump announced he was nominating Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

The senators are among six people who attended the event, which featured few masks and little social distancing, who have since tested positive for the virus.

Trump, the first lady, and top Trump aide Hope Hicks all attended the event and subsequently tested positive, showing symptoms in the expected five- to seven-day window following the event. Also Friday, the president of the University of Notre Dame, the Rev. John Jenkins, announced he, too, had tested positive for COVID-19. Jenkins attended the Saturday Rose Garden ceremony.

Earlier in the week, Jenkins sent a letter to university students and staff apologizing for not wearing a mask during Saturday’s Rose Garden ceremony for Barrett, who is a Notre Dame graduate and law professor.

Video of the event also shows Lee unmasked and hugging other attendees.

Both Lee and Tillis said they would isolate for 10 days. Lee vowed in a statement that he