sweet

Sweet Treats: Desserts & Delicacies from the Garden State

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

Just in time for Thanksgiving join the Woodbridge Public Library November 10 at 7PM to explore a variety of “sweet” culinary traditions from the 18th and 19th centuries. We will delve into how the treats we enjoy have changed and we will discuss the process and ingredients of making these food items then and now to give us some perspective!

Presented by Hilary May of Museum of Early Trades and Crafts in Madison, NJ.

Registration is required. Please register @https://bit.ly/3dbCGKO.

On the day before the program you will be sent the Zoom meeting information by email. Please note that if you are using Zoom on a tablet or smartphone you will need to download the Zoom app.

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Source Article

This 95-year-old Peninsula company found a sweet spot during the pandemic: Your kitchen

By Alicia Wallace | CNN Business

When the Covid-19 pandemic hit the US, some businesses held fast and hunkered down. Torani, the 95-year-old company that makes those colorful bottles of flavored syrup at your local coffee shop, didn’t have that luxury.

Torani needed to follow through on a plan that had been years in the making: a relocation of its headquarters and manufacturing operations from South San Francisco to a brand new building across the Bay. The Covid-19 pandemic, however, turned what was already an ambitious and expensive undertaking into a dramatic exercise in operational gymnastics.

Torani was slated to start its move in March to a spacious, 327,000-square-foot San Leandro building that would house its offices and state-of-the-art production lines. It also would serve as a Willy Wonka-esque, tourist-friendly “Flavor Factory” with a coffee-making “receptionista,” a “customer play area” to try some of the 150-plus flavors, and a speakeasy that could be accessed via a secret passageway behind a bookshelf.

But then the shelter-in-place orders came down, and restaurants and cafes were ordered to temporarily close their doors. Torani entered into pandemic planning mode and conducted a financial analysis to determine if it could weather sales drops of 20%, 30% or even 50%.

The company had borrowed around $40 million in loans to invest in its Flavor Factory.

“Could we make it? Could we hold onto everybody?” Torani CEO Melanie Dulbecco told CNN Business. “Could we pay off these loans we just borrowed? Could we keep the business running for our customers and make it?”

The privately held company, which got its start in San Francisco’s “Little Italy” neighborhood of North Beach, has been accustomed to double-digit annual revenue growth for decades. It now was projecting a 40% sales drop for the month of April and bracing