Tells

Video: Mark Meadows tells reporters he won’t ‘talk through a mask’

  • White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on Monday declined to wear a mask when addressing reporters on Capitol Hill. 
  • Walking away without answering any questions, he said, “I’m not going to talk through a mask.”
  • Journalists who cover Capitol Hill lawmakers are calling on congressional leaders to improve access to coronavirus testing and contact tracing, and to wear masks when talking to members of the media.
  • But Meadows, like President Donald Trump and others who work in the White House, continue to flout public health guidelines amid the world’s worst COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump’s chief of staff Mark Meadows refused to wear his mask on Monday while addressing reporters on Capitol Hill and walked off without taking any questions. 

During the encounter, a CNN congressional reporter, Kristin Wilson, asked Meadows to keep his face covered while speaking, according to Washington Post reporter Seung Min Kim. But Meadows pulled a microphone-outfitted podium closer to himself and took off his mask, to the concern of journalists. 

“Well, I’m more than 10 feet away,” he said.

Seconds later, Meadows put his mask back on and stalked away from the group.

“I’m not going to talk through a mask,” he said.

This incident occurred on the first day of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s confirmation hearings for Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Health experts have noted that the coronavirus is known to travel several feet in the air, especially indoors, and that mask-wearing is one of the effective ways to prevent transmission. Already, the United States has reported more than 7.7 million cases and 214,000-plus deaths, based on data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Meadows’ refusal comes as representatives for journalists covering Capitol Hill lawmakers are

At White House Event, Trump Tells Supporters He’s ‘Feeling Great’

Reporting by The Associated Press:

WASHINGTON, DC — President Donald Trump on Saturday made his first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus. The White House has refused to declare that he is no longer contagious, and the gathering of hundreds of people on the South Lawn went ahead despite the guidance of public health officials.

Trump delivered an address on his support for law enforcement from the Blue Room balcony to a friendly crowd. The president wore a mask as he walked out for the speech but took it off to make his remarks. He received an enthusiastic response from his supporters.

“I’m feeling great,” said Trump, who said he was thankful for their good wishes and prayers as he recovered.

Trump is also priming for a Florida rally on Monday and campaign events in Iowa and Pennsylvania later in the week.

The president addressed the large crowd even as the White House refuses to declare that he is no longer contagious and against the guidance of public health officials.

The White House insisted the event on the South Lawn was an official event and not a campaign rally. But Trump used the address to make broadsides against the Democratic ticket of former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris.

“I think we’re gonna swamp them by so much,” he said.

Trump appeared healthy, though perhaps a little hoarse, during the 18-minute speech that was intended to send the message that he’s back and ready to resume his battle for reelection.

Before the speech, White House officials said they had no information to release on whether the president was tested for COVID-19, meaning he made his first public appearance without the White House verifying that he’s no longer contagious.

Security was

Police concerned after man tells young girl to get into his truck in the BC Interior

For the second time this week, RCMP in the BC Interior are investigating a suspicious incident that has all the makings of a possible child abduction attempt.

The latest incident happened Tuesday afternoon in Williams Lake as a young girl was walking alone between 3-3:30 pm.

According to police, she was in the area of Proctor Street and 3 Avenue when an unknown man in a truck called her over and told her to get into his vehicle.

Fortunately, “the child did not comply and ran from home however did not immediately report the incident,” said an RCMP release.

Police provided the following description of the man who was allegedly involved:

  • Heavy
  • In his thirties
  • Fair to Medium skin
  • With red, black and blue tattoos (believed to be on his arms)
  • Short, dark brown to black hair
  • Moustache
  • Spoke English with no accent

They also provided a description of the vehicle he was driving:

  • Red and shiny with grey or silver stripe on the door
  • Appeared brand new, or had been recently been washed
  • Runs quietly
  • Large

“We are very interested in identifying and speaking with the driver of this truck to determine what his intentions were with this child,” said S/Sgt. Del Byron.

“If you were in the area of 3 Avenue and Proctor Avenue yesterday afternoon and were a witness to this incident, or have dash-cam or other surveillance video we are asking that you call us.”

Although the two incidents happened just over 100 kilometres apart on back-to-back days, the RCMP says there have been no links found between this incident and the one that occurred in Quesnel on Monday night.

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Trump tells White House doctor: ‘I feel great!’

The doctor reported that the president has “now been fever-free for more than 4 days, symptom-free for over 24 hours, and has not needed nor received any supplemental oxygen since initial hospitalization.”

In addition, Trump’s labs “demonstrated detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies from labs drawn Monday,” Conley wrote, adding that “initial IgG levels drawn late Thursday night were undetectable.”

Conley’s memo referred to the long-lasting antibodies the human body produces to combat the coronavirus, not the cloned antibodies Trump received in the form of a drug treatment.

The body normally develops long-lasting Covid-19 antibodies several days to a few weeks after infection. Their presence in Trump’s system signals that he is mounting an immune response against Covid-19 — likely with help from the drugs he was given during treatment, to some degree.

Trump has so far received two rounds of oxygen therapy, two experimental drugs — including one that is not available to the broader patient population — and one steroid generally reserved for severe or critical Covid-19 cases.

The president left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening after being admitted last Friday, and aides say he has worked from the Executive Residence since returning to the White House.

Conley’s latest memo comes after he transmitted a less substantive appraisal of Trump’s condition Tuesday afternoon, writing that the president “reports no symptoms” and “continues to do extremely well.”

Neither the Tuesday nor Wednesday memo offered any details about the state of Trump’s lungs after being battered by an acute respiratory disease, and the White House also has refused to provide a definitive timeline of the president’s Covid-19 tests in the days before his diagnosis.

Source Article

Minimalism is trending in home decor; Pranjal Agarwal tells how to use ‘less is more’ philosophy for our abode

The world, as we know it, has changed over the past few months and minimalism is the new mindset born from this period. As the extended lockdown enabled us to reconnect with loved ones, it also helped us realise the need to build a surrounding that adds value and meaning to our lives. It has become extremely essential to eliminate items which we no longer use, rather than adding clutter to our everyday lives. Here are some easy steps for you to invite the minimalism trend into your home:

 

Eliminate what you don’t need

The first step begins by eliminating all the things that you don’t need. This includes the ‘maybe’ items. Start by segregating everything in your space into three categories: Keep, Discard, and Maybe. Go over the ‘maybe’ category and eliminate everything that you think you can live without or won’t need for the next 7-8 months. 

 

Reduce 

Opting for single, impactful pieces of art can require lesser effort and yet, give your home a more polished look. This reduces the number of items one has to buy and will make the process of transforming your living room a fuss-free one. 



a cat sitting on top of a wooden chair


© Provided by Pinkvilla


Reuse 

Another core tenet of minimalist living is reusing your existing possessions to get the most out of your purchase. Before discarding your current belongings, look at it through a creative eye to decide whether it can be reused within your home. 

 

Less is better

Introduce a sense of systematic order to your house by opting for inbuilt storage units for your walls and your furniture as it is a definite space-saver. This will help you quickly transition a messy living room into a sophisticated place to host guests anytime you want. 



a kitchen filled with lots of furniture


© Provided by Pinkvilla


 

Don’t be an impulsive buyer

It’s crucial