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Tim Griffin to Depart The Kitchen After Nine Years as Director

Tim Griffin is leaving The Kitchen after nearly a decade as the director and chief curator of the experimental New York art space. During his tenure, Griffin continued and expanded the storied institution’s focus on interdisciplinarity and oversaw a program featuring Chantal Akerman, ANOHNI, Charles Atlas, Gretchen Bender, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Ralph Lemon, Aki Sasamoto, and Tyshawn Sorey, among others. His term also led to new initiatives including the hybrid talks series “The Kitchen L.A.B.” and electronic music series “Synth Nights.” Griffin—who began helming the nonprofit in 2011 after a seven-year run as the editor-in-chief of Artforum, where he is currently a contributing editor—will shift into an advisory role at The Kitchen by year’s end; he has accepted a visiting professorship in the art history and English departments at Ohio State University in Columbus, where his wife, Johanna Burton, directs The Wexner Center for the Arts.  

“I can’t imagine a more inspiring or humbling experience among artists than what The Kitchen, and its dedicated staff and board, has offered me over the years,” said Griffin. “Few places have such a history, decade after decade, of presenting the unexpected. Even fewer have people so deeply committed every day to supporting artists’ innovative work, and who, time and again, manage to pull it off whatever the challenges.”

In addition to organizing exhibitions and performances, Griffin has spent the last two years fundraising in anticipation of The Kitchen’s fiftieth anniversary in 2021 and the renovation of its building at West Nineteenth Street in Chelsea. The organization has raised $11 million ahead of its special benefit show, “Ice and Fire,” curated by Kitchen board members Wade Guyton and Jacqueline Humphries and opening tomorrow, October 1. In the last few months, the venue has also adapted to pandemic-induced lockdown, introducing The Kitchen Broadcast and revising

Tim Griffin, The Kitchen’s Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

A search for Griffin’s successor is being conducted by Isaacson Miller.

Tim Griffin, The Kitchen's Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

The Kitchen has announced that its director and chief curator, Tim Griffin, will be stepping down from the position at the end of this year.

During his tenure, Griffin organized with The Kitchen team significant projects by artists including Chantal Akerman, ANOHNI, Charles Atlas, Gretchen Bender, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Ralph Lemon, Aki Sasamoto, and Tyshawn Sorey, among many others, in addition to thematic exhibitions such as “From Minimalism into Algorithm.” The organization also developed new initiatives and programs including “The Kitchen L.A.B.,” an interdisciplinary discussion series which keyed thematic seasons since 2012; and the electronic music series “Synth Nights.” Following the spread of COVID-19, the organization also launched The Kitchen Broadcast and revised its residencies to operate with a TV studio model.

During the past two years, Griffin has focused on fundraising in anticipation of The Kitchen’s 50th anniversary in 2021 and the anticipated renovation of its building on 19th Street in Chelsea. The organization has raised approximately $11 million heading into a special benefit exhibition, “Ice and Fire,” which is curated by Kitchen board members Wade Guyton and Jacqueline Humphries and opens on October 1.

Griffin will continue as an advisor to ensure a smooth transition and on 50th anniversary initiatives, while taking a position as Visiting Associate Professor in the departments of Art History and English at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His wife, Johanna Burton, is director of the Wexner Center for the Arts.

The Kitchen Chair of the Board Greg Feldman says: “All of us at The Kitchen express our gratitude to Tim for his remarkable leadership during the past decade as both a visionary curator and fundraiser, and at a key point in The Kitchen’s history.”

“I can’t imagine a more inspiring or

Tim Scott signals White House about getting Trump to ‘correct’ debate exchange on white supremacists

Sen. Tim Scott said he told the White House that President Trump should “correct” his statement in response to a debate question about white supremacists.



Tim Scott wearing a suit and tie


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The lone black Republican currently in the Senate said on Wednesday that he believes the president “misspoke” during the first face-off against former Vice President Joe Biden that was moderated by Fox News’s Chris Wallace.

“I think he misspoke in response to Chris Wallace’s comment. He was asking Chris what he wanted to say, I think he misspoke. I think he should correct it, if he doesn’t correct it, I guess he didn’t misspeak,” the South Carolina senator told reporters, according to CNN.

“I’ve already sent my comments to the chief of staff,” Scott noted, referring to Mark Meadows.

During the debate, Wallace asked Trump if he would also denounce far-right militias and white supremacist groups who have participated in violence.

Trump initially responded that he was “willing to do that,” but he did not explicitly condemn any group.

“Do you want to call them — what do you want to call them? Give me a name,” Trump asked Wallace before addressing a specific right-wing group, the Proud Boys.

“Proud Boys? Stand back and stand by. But I’ll tell you what, somebody has got to do something about antifa and the Left because this is not a right-wing problem, this is a left-wing problem,” he said.

The Trump campaign has attempted to downplay the president’s remarks at the debate, with spokesman Hogan Gidley saying Trump has condemned white supremacists in the past.

Earlier on Wednesday another Republican in the upper chamber, Sen. Mitt Romney, told reporters that “of course” Trump should have condemned white supremacists when given the opportunity during the debate.

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