truth

Ex-Pence adviser says Trump’s Fauci ad is a ‘gross’ example of a White House with ‘no regard for the truth’

Olivia Troye, a former member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, is calling the Trump campaign’s decision to use an edited clip of Dr. Anthony Fauci in a new ad “gross and upsetting and typical of a White House that has no regard for the truth.”

Before resigning in July, Troye served as Vice President Mike Pence’s homeland security and counterterrorism adviser, and was his lead staffer on the task force. She began speaking out against the Trump administration last month, releasing an ad with the Republican Voters Against Trump organization that slammed the president for not taking COVID-19 seriously.

Fauci is the nation’s top infectious disease expert, and for a new ad, the Trump campaign spliced together Fauci’s words in an attempt to make it sound like he was praising the president’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Fauci said on Sunday his words were used out of context and without his permission, and over the course of his career he has “never publicly endorsed any political candidate.” On Monday, he called on the campaign to take down the ad.

Troye was shocked by the ad, and in response she quickly filmed a new video for Republican Voters Against Trump, which was released on Monday night. In it, Troye explains that she worked side-by-side with Fauci on the coronavirus task force, and she “witnessed Donald Trump and senior White House officials routinely sideline and discredit Dr. Fauci, both privately and publicly, and now the Trump campaign is twisting Dr. Fauci’s words in a campaign ad for their own political gain.”

This is “gross and upsetting and typical of a White House that has no regard for the truth,” Troye continues. “For Donald Trump, it’s always about him. For Dr. Fauci, it’s always been about serving the American people. Join

The White House doctor didn’t come *close* to telling the truth about the President’s condition

On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley said this when asked about President Donald Trump’s health and treatment:



a man wearing a suit and tie: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)


© Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

“This morning the President is doing very well. … He is not on oxygen right now. He has not needed any today at all.”

Later in the day — like less than an hour after Conley’s statement — came a contradictory statement from a “source familiar with the President’s health” that said “the President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care.”

Asked about the discrepancy between the two statements on Sunday, Conley said this:

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the President in his course of illness has had. I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so it came off that we’re trying to hide something.”

What?

Like, WHAT!

Conley is a doctor. Not a press person. Not a campaign consultant. A doctor.

As such, it is not his job — or anything close to his job — to “reflect the upbeat attitude” of the President or anyone else. It’s his job to provide facts. Facts like: has the President needed supplemental oxygen? What is his temperature? What is his prognosis? You know, medical facts.

But, that wasn’t even the worst thing that Conley said. It’s this sentence that really tipped everything over the edge.

I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course