kitchen

The Best Prime Day kitchen deals: Ninja air fryer for $83, Le Creuset stockpot for $120 and more discounts

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

Amazon Prime Day, one of the biggest shopping events of the year, is upon us. Deals upon deals upon deals are steadily emerging on Amazon. We’re talking 16-piece cookware sets priced at just $60, and big-name brands like KitchenAid, Ninja and OXO offering up sales on everything from small appliances to stockpots. Keep this page handy and check back often as we’ll keep this story updated with more kitchen and home Prime Day deals as they become available.

Read more on Chowhound: When is Amazon Prime Day 2020? And what kinds of deals can you expect? 

Amazon

Now’s the time to join the Instant Pot cult with this seven-in-one multicooker: It’s a pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, steamer, sterilizer, sauté pan and yogurt maker. The 6-quart capacity can cook food for up to six people — perfect for larger families or for anyone who likes to meal prep.

Amazon

This Ninja air fryer is all you’ll need to fry up your favorite foods, using 75% less fat, and it can also dehydrate fruits and vegetables to make DIY snacks and chips. Plus, the parts are dishwasher-safe, making for easy clean up.  

Amazon

Soup season is well upon us, and what better way to kick it off than with a brand-new stock pot from Le Creuset? This meringue-colored 16-quart pot is complete with a tight-fitting lid and two triple-welded handles, perfect for filling homemade stock or a delightful butternut squash soup. 

Amazon

No kitchen is complete without a stand mixer — that much is true. The bright red mixer accomplishes all your baking needs, from blending butter and sugar to kneading dough,

Prime Day Kitchen Essentials Deal: Save Up to 43%

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The Best Prime Day Kitchen Deals 2020 | The Strategist

Photo: Amazon

The sixth-annual Prime Day has arrived — a few months later than last year, but just in time to kick off what’s possibly the earliest holiday shopping season in history. All those deals can be overwhelming, but we at the Strategist are here to help suss out the best deals worth taking advantage of.

And Prime Day always presents a, well, prime opportunity to secure one-of-a-kind deals on kitchen items and top-of-the-line appliances, whether that’s finally springing for the stand mixer that’ll revolutionize your baking abilities or investing in an air fryer that can replace your takeout habit. Note that everything will be on sale only until supplies last, so don’t dillydally — and be sure to bookmark our Prime Day hub and follow us on Twitter for any updates. We’ll be updating frequently. (And remember: You need to be a Prime member to snag all deals.) And to make things a little bit easier, we’ve organized it into categories, from small appliances to cookware to cutlery.

Cookware

Small appliances

Coffee

Storage

Dishware

Cutlery

The Strategist is designed to surface the most useful, expert recommendations for things to buy across the vast e-commerce landscape. Some of our latest conquests include the best acne treatments, rolling luggage, pillows for side sleepers, natural anxiety remedies, and bath towels. We update links when possible, but note that deals can expire and all prices are subject to change.

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Longtime Commander’s Palace chef departs, and for first time a woman leads the kitchen | Where NOLA Eats

For the first time in almost two decades, Commander’s Palace has a new chef. For the first time in the famous restaurant’s long history that chef is a woman.

Tory McPhail, executive chef since 2002, has resigned and is moving to Montana, where he will work with a local restaurant group in the mountain town of Bozeman.



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Chef Meg Bickford of Commander’s Palace restaurant in New Orleans, Oct. 2020.




His successor at Commander’s Palace is Meg Bickford, who was previously executive sous chef.

Bickford, 34, has risen through the ranks at Commander’s Palace and is now the first woman to lead the landmark restaurant’s kitchen.

To Bickford, that speaks to a culture of mentoring at Commander’s Palace and to its family leadership. The restaurant is run today by Ti Martin and Lally Brennan, cousins who grew up in the restaurant.

“I’ve had a lot of opportunities to grow here, and a lot of people who invested the time and effort and who believed in me,” Bickford said. “That’s what we do here, and that’s why I’m in this position today.”

Passing the torch

Bickford’s new position is among the most prominent in the New Orleans culinary world, with a role that goes beyond directing its sprawling kitchen.



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Commander’s Palace was voted tops in four categories, including Best new Orleans Restaurant.




Commander’s Palace is a byword for New Orleans fine dining and among the best-known restaurants in the region. Though its history goes back to 1893, it became an emblem of modern New Orleans cuisine in the 1970s after the Brennan family acquired the vintage restaurant. It pioneered haute Creole cuisine, which reshaped the national reputation of New Orleans food from a bulwark of tradition to a hotbed of innovation.



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Commander’s Palace chef

‘It Came Down to What I Could Make at My Kitchen Table’: Amy Sherald on Experimenting With a New Medium for the First Time in Decades

On October 19th, Hauser and Wirth gallery will present a series of five new paintings by artist Amy Sherald in an online exhibition titled “Womanist is to Feminist as Purple is to Lavender.” The title draws from a phrase attributed to Alice Walker and her exploration of “womanist” ideology, which accounted for the intersectional experiences of Black women left out of established feminism, in the anthology titled In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens, from 1983.

In these new paintings, Sherald conducts an examination of identity analogous to Walker’s, experimenting with new materials and themes that celebrate femininity, self-awareness, and leisure through the prism of Blackness. In doing so, the artist reveals expressions of Black life that have been historically absent in Black imagery. She presents simple acts of leisure that are not luxuries of privilege or passive pursuits, but essential elements of wellness that remind us of the restorative power of joy.

Amy Sherald approaches social portraiture with an intentionality that is expressed in the unique characteristics of her paintings. Her grey skin tones have become abstractions of blackness that reject social stratifications that underlie racism and colorism. Sherald paints her subjects on solid color backgrounds that accentuate the contrasting shades of their clothing and the lush texture of their natural coifs. Her intentionality extends to the visual parity the artist creates in the leveled gaze between the subject and viewer, asserting her subject’s rightful place in the pantheon of portraiture.

Taken together, these artistic devices subvert narrow social constructs around blackness while maintain the essence of its beauty. Her work has earned her the critical and popular acclaim that led to her 2018 portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama in the National Portrait Gallery and, most recently, a commission for a portrait of Breonna Taylor featured that became