Antique

Antique decor adds mystery to your home

By Angella Nampewo

From way back in the day, I have been a lover of old things; finger rings, lampshades and lots of other knickknacks. The beauty of owning these ancient things is that they are one-of-a-kind items, which you are unlikely to find anywhere, so antiques score 100 per cent on the scale of uniqueness. The trouble with antiques is that they are not sold everywhere. You have to have a keen eye or a bunch of connected friends with similar tastes to get your hands on some of these pieces.

Not an ordinary love

They are not your ordinary household goods. Antiques are quaint and ancient. They are bits and bobs collected from the old world. These items are not sold in regular shops on your average street. For one thing, antiques are not easy to come by and to qualify as things of value, they must have a back story. In order to find these sought after but precious and rare items, one may need to put in some leg work and it is while walking through the back streets that you will likely find a corner shop full of the goodies. If you are not lucky to stumble on a dealer or antiques’ shop, then you have to rely on word of mouth recommendation from others with similar interests to point you in the right direction.

In the past, while walking around Kampala, I have stumbled on a flea market at Centenary Park where, fortunately, I managed to pick up a lamp holder with a woven lampshade. The lampshade has served me well and though I was unable to trace its story and previous owner, every time I look at it, there is the secret satisfaction of sharing in the original owner’s good taste.

Then there

‘Olde Good Things’ Antique Store Opens In Hell’s Kitchen

HELL’S KITCHEN, NY — A rarity amid a dire retail climate in New York City, an expansive new business has arrived in Hell’s Kitchen: Olde Good Things, an antique and architectural salvage store, which opened in the neighborhood on Friday.

The 8,000-square-foot, two-floor space on West 52nd Street between Eighth and Ninth avenues has room for large reclaimed items, including gates, columns and windows, as well as light fixtures, mirrors and other furniture, the company said in a news release.

The store is also selling reclaimed items from New York landmarks, including the Waldorf Astoria, the Plaza Hotel and the Flatiron Building, the store said.

The Hell’s Kitchen location joins two existing Olde Good Things stores on Bowery and the Upper West Side, as well as locations in Los Angeles and Scranton, Pa.

The shops are operated by the Church of Bible Understanding, a Pennsylvania-based Evangelical Christian church which has reportedly poured millions of dollars into the stores.

Proceeds from the shops help fund the church’s charitable work in Haiti, according to the OGT website. Earlier this year, 13 children were killed in a fire in a Haiti orphanage operated by the church, which is now facing allegations of neglect.

Olde Good Things began in the 1990s in a Chelsea flea market before opening its own stores, according to the company website.

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