Canberra

Kitchen Garden: Nature’s buzzing along Dairy Road | The Canberra Times

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This week the kitchen garden meets nature. First stop Jerrabomberra Wetlands (hat, boots and water bottle recommended). From the car park walk into the first bird hide called Ardea (a genus of herons). It is dark and quiet and we watch a pair of ducks bobbing their heads as they swim (spring flirting) and a pair of masked lapwings on an islet in Kelly’s Swamp. From the next hide a couple with binoculars point out shoveler ducks with three ducklings. A quad of pelicans do a fly past. The sound of church bells is drowned out in the sunken frog-watch area where water is a centimetre below metal gratings. Something is splashing around in this reach of the Molonglo, an Australian water rat, a carp or maybe a platypus. The area where you walk between reeds as high as your shoulders is particularly alluring. Driving along Dairy Road there is a burst of colour. Canberra City Farm is a partner with Floriade: Reimagained and vibrant poppies, tulips and pansies, well mulched, line the fence. Christine Vincent was the Floriade team leader from CCF with four female assistants for the planting plus two males who did bed preparation and mowing. From the gates of the City Farm you can compare Canberra red clay soil with beds black with compost. Broad beans are surrounded by a rosemary hedge and bright orange calendulas. One plot is filled with huge artichoke plants and massed borage, hundreds of bees buzzing its blue flowers. People can walk in through the wetland gateways but, because of COVID restrictions, twice weekly opportunities have been set up for interested people to visit on supervised tours. You can book on [email protected] for a one-hour tour on Monday or Thursday mornings. The

Kitchen Garden: When life gives you lemons | The Canberra Times

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Following reference to a peach tree grown from a seed by Betty Cornhill and still producing a good crop of peaches in the Canberra Organic Growers’ Society garden now named after her in Curtin, Sue McCarthy of O’Connor said the photo of the tree by Minh Chu (Kitchen Garden, September 22) “resonates with me because, just like Betty Cornhill, all of us gardeners have limited time to leave a more lasting impact. Trees do that.” In a local nursery recently a young man from Downer was consulting a book while looking at trees for sale. His choice was between the tulip tree (liriodendron tulipifera) and the sugar maple (acer saccharum). Both need extra water in Canberra and tulip trees suffer from hot winds. There is a sugar maple forest at the National Arboretum planted in 2009. The sap from mature trees is used for making Canadian maple syrup. Original property owners in this district often planted bunya pines (araucaria bidwillii) near their homesteads. There is also a bunya forest at the Arboretum, historic trees at Lanyon homestead, one on the corner of Kings Avenue, another in Weston Park’s English Garden. In March, below a tree near the gates to the Australian National Botanic Gardens was a fallen cone with its edible seeds. On September 23 in a letter to The Canberra Times, a woman from Belconnen wrote, “What blissful rain washing the stench of our flowering plum trees out of the air. A pity we missed the hail, it might have knocked their flowers off as well. Why do we continue to plant these trees which smell of rotting fish in so many Canberra streets?” Do flowering plum trees have an unpleasant smell? I have not noticed it. The blossoms have been

Inside the Japanese retreat at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra

Behind the unique front of this 1950s home lies a spectacular ‘Japanese retreat’ – complete with a dreamy bathroom sanctuary, modern decor and an airy open plan living area perfect for entertaining

  • An architect has created an epic oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street
  • The one-of-a-kind home at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham was inspired by Japanese interior design
  • Made from Australian-sourced recycled materials, it has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a four-car garage
  • Standout features include a bath clad in Tasmanian oak and a grass-watering system controlled from an app
  • The outdoor deck is made out of timber salvaged from a basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport
  • So unique is the design that the home is nominated for the 2020 Master Builders Association Housing Awards

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An architect has transformed a 1950s brick cottage into a unique oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street.

Redesigned in collaboration between construction firm MegaFlora and architect Blake O’Neill, the one-of-a-kind two-storey at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham, in the capital’s leafy north, was inspired by the owners’ love of Japanese interiors which are simple but always of the highest quality craftsmanship.

Built from recycled materials sourced across New South Wales and the ACT, the four-bedroom house – which took three years to complete – has sustainability etched into every corner.

The outdoor entertainment deck is made out of timber salvaged from an old basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport, while a whopping 680 metres of repurposed hardwood battens run along the ceiling alone.

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The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra,