Colorado

Secure Halloween Decor, Long Period Of Windy Weather Ahead For Colorado

DENVER (CBS4) – If you have Halloween decor outside you may want to make sure it is extra secure Tuesday. That’s because starting Tuesday night and into Wednesday we have several rounds of strong and gusty wind on the way.

Some of the strongest gusts will likely be in the mountains and foothills of Boulder County and Larimer County where the National Weather Service has issued a High Wind Watch. The current forecast calls for gusts to approach 80 mph at times.



map


© Provided by CBS Denver


A shift in the jet stream will drive the wind over the next few days. There is an area of low pressure currently above Washington that will move to the east between now and Thursday, carving out a large trough of lower pressure.

At the surface a strong cold front will race through Colorado late Wednesday with much colder air. The pressure gradient associated with this temperature change will help drive the strong winds.



diagram


© Provided by CBS Denver


Unfortunately it appears this will be a dry cold front with only a small chance for a few stray rain or snow showers along the Continental Divide. After a few chilly days it will warm up over the weekend before another cold front arrives for Sunday bringing more strong wind gusts.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Putting your Colorado garden to bed for the winter

Autumn weather so far is resembling summer, other than the brief cold snap last month.

Along with recent 80-degree days, there are dangerous fires still burning in parts of the state. The city of Fort Collins is on water restrictions because of drought, the Cameron Peak fire and the maintenance project on the Horsetooth Reservoir.

Next week, temperatures should cool to the 60s with little to no moisture relief in sight.

Will sweater and parka weather arrive soon? Your guess is as good as mine. It is Colorado, after all, and winter can arrive any minute, impolitely skipping a gradual cool-wet fall season that gardeners and landscape plants prefer.

Let’s all make the best of it: Get some exercise outside on these beautiful October days and put the landscape to bed properly.

Water

Our landscapes are dry. We’ve had only one moisture-producing storm of late along the Front Range. (You remember Sept. 8 and 9, when it snowed and gardeners quietly cursed.) For an already dry region that only receives roughly 15 inches of precipitation yearly, we are currently at 7½ inches. Nature has some catching up to do.

Landscape plant roots absolutely need to be moist going into cold weather prior to the ground freezing. Dry roots can spell disaster for perennial plants that went in the ground this past spring, summer or last week. Dry tree roots, coupled with lack of winter moisture, can lead to root and branch death, less foliage, scorched foliage, no foliage or no tree next year.

If you are unsure if your landscape is dry, the simplest way to assess is to poke a screwdriver straight down in landscaped areas, like mulched beds, lawns and around trees. If it goes down easily, you’re probably not too dry. Conversely, if you’re using a bit

Colorado Springs artist creates secret garden in new exhibit | Arts & Entertainment

What lurks below a thriving garden might be even more beautiful.

Liz McCombs has spent months building a secret garden in her studio. What has emerged are ceramic and mixed-media humanlike sculptures all caught in the mysterious process of metamorphosis. Greenery sprouts up out of curled-up human figures; rootlike vegetables have grown heads sporting full lips and round eyes; and femalelike figures are given tangled roots for legs while lush gardens push up out of their skulls.


Popular ghost stories walking tours in Manitou Springs expanding this Halloween season

Her pieces start with kiln-fired ceramic to which she adds recycled materials, such as wood, bark and pieces of glass.

“A key element of the show was transformation from one thing to something else,” says the longtime Colorado Springs artist. “In the garden you have birth, death, one thing nourishing something else, all things that make life life. I incorporate those ideas into each of the pieces. Each one has a unique story. They all fall under the overreaching idea of transition.”

“Secret Garden” is open now at Bridge Gallery. You can see the show from noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays through October. McCombs also will be working in the gallery throughout the month. Also on display will be a series of Halloween-inspired pieces, some influenced by the Day of the Dead Mexican holiday.

McCombs, an avid gardener, has always been fascinated by the cycle of life under the surface, and in this case, the garden. A simple seed is planted, watered and nourished with loving care and attention. How will that seed grow? What will it become? The possibilities are endless.

“It’s like the acorn turning into an oak tree,” she says. “I like the revealed and concealed idea. There are secrets inside all things and if given the right

Colorado State House District 45 candidate Q&A

Why are you seeking public office?
It’s time for Douglas County to have a representative who is more inclusive. I’m heartbroken at the provocative anti-LGBTQ+ legislation introduced by the current representative. I’m a second amendment supporter, gun owner and sport shooter who believes in common sense gun legislation.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
1- Providing resources to combat COVID using science and data.

2- Dismantle TABOR

3- Address Education needs such as funding, class size and teacher evaluations.

Do you support some type of public option health insurance or Medicare for All at the state level? If so, which and why? If not, why not?
Access to medical care, including physical, mental and women’s healthcare are a human right. This would enable every resident, especially children to enjoy a happier, healthy and productive life.

Have your views on policing and racism in Colorado changed this year? If so, how?
Recent events prove the police are grossly mishandling incidents involving people of color. Racism and bias were always suspected, but this year we have irrefutable proof of that from across the country. I’m particularly disturbed by the image of a black family being made to lie on the hot asphalt during a “stolen car” investigation in Aurora. I can’t imagine the same happening to a white family. And that’s the glaring difference.

Do you place a greater importance on addressing climate change or preserving Colorado’s

Colorado State House District 33 candidate Q&A

Why are you seeking public office?
It’s been an honor to serve the people of Broomfield, Superior and Erie over the past four years. We’ve accomplished a lot in advancing paid family and medical leave, criminal justice reform and protecting people who need unemployment insurance in an unprecedented time. We still have a lot of work to do on improving transportation and public education, and I’m excited to do it.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
Finally funding transportation adequately, finally funding public education adequately, and implementing paid family and medical leave.

Do you support some type of public option health insurance or Medicare for All at the state level? If so, which and why? If not, why not?
I support a public option if structured responsibly, and I trust those working on it. Medicare is a federal program so can’t be implemented at the state level.

Have your views on policing and racism in Colorado changed this year? If so, how?
I learned most about the criminal justice system when I was working in it every day as a prosecutor. I’ve also done a lot of listening in the past year from folks in the community.

Do you place a greater importance on addressing climate change or preserving Colorado’s oil and gas industry? What steps would you take on these issues as a lawmaker?
I think you can be smart about both. As we actively transition to renewable energy, we still need oil and gas, which we can manage responsibly. We also need to