Crash

Family killed in Oxford A40 crash ‘were moving house’

Zoe Powell from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, with her husband Josh and their three children. (Sarah Mak Photography)
Zoe Powell from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, with her husband Josh and their three children. (Sarah Mak Photography)

A family who lost a mother and three children in a car crash near Oxford had recently moved because their house burned down, according to a report.

The four victims, named in the media as Zoe Powell, 29, daughters Amelia, four, and Phoebe, eight, and six-year-old son Simeon, all died in an incident on the A40 Monday evening.

Police said the collision involved their Subaru people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.

Two other passengers in the Subaru, reported as Powell’s 30-year-old husband Josh and their 18-month old daughter, were taken to hospital in Oxford and are in a critical condition.

Thames Valley Police said the driver of the HGV, a 56-year-old man, suffered minor injuries.

Zoe Powell was named as a victim of the A40 crash. (Sarah Mak Photography)
Zoe Powell was named as a victim of the A40 crash. (Sarah Mak Photography)

The Sun reported that William Milroy, Zoe Powell’s father, said the family, who were living in Chinnor, Oxfordshire, had been moving from house to house but recently began renting a long-term place.

“They were going home. I don’t know where they had been but they had recently moved into a new rented house after theirs had burned down,” he said.

Zoe Powell ran a blog website about being a mother, oriented towards the mental health and wellbeing of mums.

A police witness appeal sign on the A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman from Chinnor, Oxfordshire, died Monday night after a collision between a people carrier and a heavy goods vehicle.
A police witness appeal sign on the A40 near Oxford where a four-year-old girl, a six-year-old boy, an eight-year-old girl and a 29-year-old woman died. (PA)

She would write about coping when a child is ill, dealing with new challenges and promoting the use of a journal to record events and feelings.

The mother also made videos for Youtube in which she talked about writing down thoughts.

Police were called to the collision at 9.50pm

Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash | Josh Ryan-Collins | Opinion

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading up to the housing bubble that precipitated the UK’s 2007-9 banking crisis. The resulting economic catastrophe led to

Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.



a person standing in front of a store: Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

Related: Lenders left wondering how PM’s homeowners pledge will be achieved

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading

Driver Of Stolen Pickup Truck In Boston Public Garden Crash Arrested

BOSTON (CBS) – A homeless man has been charged in a horrific pickup truck crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden that left a woman critically hurt. Keith Andrade, 58  was ordered held on $20,000 bail at his arraignment in municipal court Friday afternoon.

According to WBZ-TV I-Team sources, a firefighter left the truck running outside the Boylston Street fire station Thursday afternoon when a man stole it and took off. A short time later, it crashed through the garden gate at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street South.

A woman who had been walking on the sidewalk was pinned under the debris. A nurse and a doctor rushed to help her before she was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

“She grabbed the victim’s hand in an attempt to pull her out of the way.  She tripped on her high heel and was consequently unable to get out of the way to avoid being struck,” said prosecutor Colleen O’Neill.

According to the police report, she was entering the garden with a friend when they heard a “loud sound” and saw a pickup truck coming at them at a “rapid rate of speed.” The woman tripped on a high heel and couldn’t get out of the way before she was hit.

Witnesses said the driver, later identified by police as Andrade, simply walked away.

About four hours later, police said they found the man who fit the description of the driver at Washington Street and School Street. When officers approached him they said he gave them another name. Police discovered he had two active warrants for larceny and arrested him.

Pedestrian hurt in pickup truck crash at entrance to Boston Public Garden







Pedestrian hurt in pickup truck crash at entrance to Boston Public Garden

Police were investigating a crash involving a pedestrian and pickup truck at one of the entrances to the Boston Public Garden in Boston.



a truck on a city street: A photo of a pick-up truck involved in a crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street


© Twitter/Charley A
A photo of a pick-up truck involved in a crash at the entrance to the Boston Public Garden at the corner of Boylston and Charles Street

The crash happened at the corner of Boylston and Charles Streets just before 5 p.m Thursday.


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Photos from the scene showed the Chevy Colorado pickup truck on