Department

Halloween decor’s realism at Riverside, California home prompts multiple calls requesting fire department response

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — A Riverside, California family’s Halloween decor is so realistic that multiple people have made emergency phone calls summoning firefighters to the home.

To say Carmen and Travis Long love Halloween is an understatement.

They began creating their “Pirates of the Caribbean”-themed creation three years ago.

“We’ve been adding things every year,” said homeowner Carmen Long. “It started with just skeletons, then we added a cannon in the back and the ship, the pretend fire on the side.”

Safe Halloween science ideas during COVID

The make-believe blaze is so realistic that passersby have called the fire department numerous times.

Onlookers can watch the creative show every Friday through Sunday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the corner of Chapman Place and Magnolia Avenue.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Source Article

Halloween decor’s realism at Riverside home prompts multiple calls requesting fire department response

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (KABC) — A Riverside family’s Halloween decor is so realistic that multiple people have made emergency phone calls summoning firefighters to the home.

To say Carmen and Travis Long love Halloween is an understatement.

They began creating their “Pirates of the Caribbean”-themed creation three years ago.

“We’ve been adding things every year,” said homeowner Carmen Long. “It started with just skeletons, then we added a cannon in the back and the ship, the pretend fire on the side.”

Safe Halloween science ideas during COVID

The make-believe blaze is so realistic that passersby have called the fire department numerous times.

Onlookers can watch the creative show every Friday through Sunday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the corner of Chapman Place and Magnolia Avenue.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Source Article

Durham Fire Department notes increase in kitchen fires during COVID-19 pandemic

DURHAM, N.C. (WTVD) — The aftermath of a fire can be shocking.

“It’s more than just you burn up your favorite pan and have to throw it in the trash. And it can happen really, really quickly,” said Elaine Towner, Durham Fire Department life safety educator.

That’s why every October, the Durham Fire Department tries educate residents about fire safety before it’s too late.

This year is all about safety in the kitchen. Durham firefighters said they have seen an increase in kitchen fires during the pandemic.

“There are a lot of distractions going on in people’s’ homes because that’s where they are all the time and it’s really easy to lose track of what’s going on in your kitchen,” Towner said.

RELATED: Raleigh family escapes fire tragedy thanks to 4-year-old child’s quick thinking

Towner says the number one way to prevent a kitchen fire-don’t leave your stove unattended if you’re cooking and don’t leave anything on the counter that could catch on fire. If you’re cooking with grease, keep a pot lid nearby.

“If it flares up, put the lid on it and turn the stove off,” Towner said.

During fire prevention month, firefighters usually spend a lot of time talking to school groups to spread their safety messages, but the pandemic put those presentations on pause. For now, they’ve gone virtual by creating educational videos on their Durham Fire and Life Safety Facebook page.

Towner said firefighters are still answering calls for help.

“It does take a little bit longer to get all that PPE on and get into the home but they’re still coming. We’re still running calls,” Towner said.

If you would like to share those educational videos with your family, click here.

SEE MORE: Fire escape planning with your family

Durham Fire Department said teachers

Department of Interior announces e-bike regulations despite lawsuit, conservation concerns

Staff and wire reports

The Department of the Interior on Friday announced that it finalized electric bike (or e-bike) regulations that it says paves the way for land managers to allow more people, especially older Americans and those with physical limitations, to experience bicycling on public lands managed by the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Bureau of Reclamation.

“Enhancing access to our public lands and expanding recreational opportunities to all Americans is a priority for the Trump Administration,” U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt said in a release. “The new regulations allow our public land managers to provide e-bike access to bike trails, enhancing the opportunities to utilize our public lands to create life-long memories.”

The final regulations come 13 months after Bernhardt ordered the National Park Service to grant e-bike riders the same access in parks as muscle-powered cyclists.

The policy change toward the end of August 2019 came without public disclosure and without an opportunity for the public to comment on the proposal before it was implemented, moves that appear in conflict with the Code of Federal Regulations. The secretarial order called for the policy to be adopted “unless otherwise prohibited by law or regulation” within two weeks. It also called for public comment, after the fact, some time in the future.

Last December, Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) filed a lawsuit to overturn the Interior Department’s move to expand e-bike access in the National Park System.

The 31-page filing, made by PEER with three other conservation groups and two individuals, charged that the decision-making process violated the Administrative Procedures Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The plaintiffs also argued that an advisory committee comprised of industry-friendly representatives met regularly with Interior officials to

State Farm teams up with Scarborough Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm agent Michelle Raber are teaming up with the Scarborough Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2,500 fire departments across the country, including Scarborough. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week, taking place Oct. 4-10, including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half – 49 percent – happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm agent Michelle Raber. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.


« Previous


Next »