designers

Jaggad HQ interior designer’s property journey

Romy Dankner is an interior designer. Her business is Homeroom Studio.

Where do you live?

In Caulfield South, with my husband, Roy, daughter Maya, sons Nadav and Asher, and our little fur baby, Luna.

What do you love most about your home?

The kitchen and family room. We love to cook and entertain, and we all gravitate around the large island counter or sink into our sofa for nights around the log fireplace. It’s a space where we create so many memories.

Have you changed anything?

We extended the property by adding a main bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite. We also added a home office and the kitchen and family room. Our family was growing, so the extra spaces were needed.

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Most memorable home you’ve lived in?

Our little apartment in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was a special time in our lives when we lived amid the hustle and bustle of the city and were within walking distance of the beach, shops and cafes. It was very small but had charm.

First foot on the property ladder?

After returning to Melbourne 17 years ago, I was determined to build for the first time. I wasn’t a designer then, but I have always been creative and in awe of the building process. We bought a block of land in Caulfield South, subdivided it and built our first townhouse.

Are you a keen or reluctant property buyer?

I always find purchasing property an emotional rollercoaster of patience, excitement, research (and many tears). But I love buying property and developing it. Watching these creations come to life

Interior Designers Are Helping Businesses Reimagine Their Workspace

covid-19 workspace
Walled off: Glass or acrylic partitions in a workspace create a sense of separation that makes people feel safer. // Photograph courtesy of MarxModa

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to push businesses to reimagine their workspaces into more hygienic, socially distant environments, interior design professionals are busy helping metro Detroit companies transform offices, community areas, and more for a new age of working.

Whitney Marx, 33, CEO of MarxModa, a Michigan-based interior design business headquartered in Detroit that creates workspaces for commercial, healthcare, and small-business clients, among others, first saw a need for COVID-19 workspace redesigns in February, with the demand intensifying in March and remaining steady since.

“Best practices continue to evolve, and we continue to design for flexibility in the workplace,” she says. “We expect new information almost daily, so design with the ability to adapt is critical.”

Marx and her team of interior designers partner closely with clients to change or adjust their spaces to help employees feel safe at work. “The first clients we helped were the essential businesses, especially healthcare-related clients and organizations looking to set up temporary COVID-care facilities very quickly,” she explains.

MarxModa formed a focus group early on that included clients, manufacturers, experts, and some of its team members to discuss challenges created by the pandemic and possible solutions that space planning and design could offer. Since then, they have worked with hundreds of clients to implement these strategies as people have returned to work.

“We’ve tried to be a resource to help our clients sift through the noise and understand things like new space allocation requirements and density danger zones in their office,” Marx says. Critical locations for COVID-19 safety consideration include common areas where people gather, lobbies, elevators, kitchens, restrooms, and print areas.

Updates to floor plans to meet

It’s James Deakin versus licensed interior designers this time

The TV host offended some designers for working with an unlicensed decorator and then asking: ‘Do you really require a license or law for choosing fabrics, colors, and furniture?

Sometimes, there comes a necessary—if a little aggressive—conversation that shines a spotlight on a long brewing issue. Social media has certainly accelerated how we’ve pushed certain topics to the fore. 

The hot topic issue of the coming week—James Deakin being called out for working with a “decorator” instead of a licensed interior designer. He is certainly not the first person to do that, but as one of the more famous personalities, many designers felt it was an affront and an endorsement to hire non-licensed interior decorators.  

On Sunday, Oct. 4,  the TV host on Facebook defended his decision to work with YouTube vlogger Elle Uy, who has recently rounded up her followers to 700,000 strong, on his place.

Elle is not a licensed interior decorator, but is well known on YouTube and in social media for her budget decorating tips. 

James’ first post was of him sharing a photo of his living area, where he shared that Elle was helping him choose the valance for his curtains.

A poster, who shared Deakin’s post, but whose name has been blurred, reposted this post with this caption: “When someone like James Deakin promotes unlicensed practitioners, we should do something about it.”

Another one also wrote about how this “blatantly disregards the profession,” coming from a long line of what they perceive as attacks due to publications publishing DIY stories of home renovations this quarantine and how this can come off as saying that interior designers are not essential. One post ends with, “Our collective voices need to be heard. There is a law for interior design. RA 10350.”

RA 10350 is

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION …

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers ( ASID ) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION IN NEW RESILIENCY REPORT

In Partnership with Design Leaders Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald, Research Demonstrates the Effects of COVID-19 on Design Professionals and Spaces

Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will