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Pawtucket’s Guild brewery now has a pop-up beer garden in Providence – Food and Dining – providencejournal.com

Every great city needs a beer garden, said Jeremy Duffy, co-founder of The Guild brewery in Pawtucket.

“They bring people together and build community,” he said.

Now, he’s doing his part to make that happen introducing The Guild PVD, a weekend-only, pop-up beer garden in downtown Providence that launched Sept. 25 for a six week run.


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The outdoor space with beer poured from a truck, occupies 4,200 square feet in the Providence Innovation District Park, by the pedestrian bridge. It will be open Friday-Sunday, with limited capacity, through Sunday, Nov. 1. There are no reservations, only walk-ins from 3 to 6 p.m. Friday, 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Each weekend will also feature different food trucks organized by Smoke & Squeal BBQ and Ocean State Food Truck Festivals.

How did The Guild get here?

It started with Duffy talking to I-195 Redevelopment District Commission last year after the opening of the pedestrian bridge. They discussed The Guild offering some temporary concessions.

“This was all pre-COVID,” Duffy said.

Fast forward to last summer when Duffy was told the park was ready and setting up a beer garden would go well with Governor Raimondo’s “Take it outside” campaign.

And so a public-private partnership between The Guild, Rhode Island Commerce and the 195 Commission was born.

Though smaller than Duffy’s original vision, the space offers distanced seating for 74 people at long tables set eight feet apart, outside.

“The views are phenomenal,” he said. “Everyone seems thrilled,” he said.

The Guild, which brews for not

San Francisco’s Farmhouse Kitchen opens glitzy Thai restaurant in Menlo Park, indoor dining included | Peninsula Foodist | Elena Kadvany

San Francisco Thai restaurant Farmhouse Kitchen has opened a glitzy new location in Menlo Park, offering limited indoor and outdoor dining, takeout and delivery.

Farmhouse Kitchen has revamped the 4,000-square-foot space at 1165 Merrill St., across from the Caltrain station, decking it out with opulent decorations (including handmade gold Thai chandeliers and flower wall), a private dining room, a lounge area with velvet chairs and gleaming full bar. The restaurant opened barely a week after San Mateo County announced that indoor dining could resume at 25% capacity or with 100 people, whichever is fewer.


The ornate dining room at Farmhouse Kitchen in Menlo Park. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

But the “new normal guidelines” for dining in at Farmhouse Kitchen includes a health screening, temperature check, masks required when diners aren’t eating or drinking and parties of no more than six people with reservations capped at 90 minutes. The restaurant also charges a $3 “COVID-19 sanitation fee” per table.

Kasem Saengsawang, a native of Thailand, opened his first Farmhouse Kitchen in San Francisco in 2015. The restaurant was inspired by the food he ate and cooked growing up in Loei, a rural province in northeast Thailand, but he spent much of his adult years in Bangkok.

Saengsawang now runs five restaurants, including one in Portland, Oregon. He recently moved to Menlo Park so plans to be a frequent presence at this location.


A Farmhouse Kitche appetizer: sesame-crusted ahi tuna with cucumber, seaweed salad, lemongrass and spicy chili lime. Photo courtesy Farmhouse Kitchen.

Saengsawang describes his cooking style as “contemporary.” The Farmhouse Kitchen Menlo Park menu spans Northern and Southern Thailand, including dishes like pineapple fried rice, lobster pad thai, 24-hour beef noodle soup and slow-braised short rib served with panang curry, a dish the menu says is “reminiscent” of the large

Swiggy’s cloud kitchen model is set to transform dining

When food delivery startup Swiggy started cloud kitchens three years ago, it was a sideshow in its food delivery business. The concept caught on as restaurant brands that had a following in one area could expand easily into new localities or even other cities. Investment in real estate was reduced because these kitchens could be smaller and didn’t need premium locations, apart from doing away with seating and the staff for serving.

Various models arose. Some introduced cloud kitchens in addition to restaurants for expansion, like Chennai’s Buhari becoming available in Coimbatore. Others like Rebel Foods created fully virtual brands that only came from dark kitchens. This became a new real estate and services play as restaurants only had to provide cooking staff while everything else, including cleaning and maintenance, could be outsourced.

Cloud kitchens caught a new impetus after the covid pandemic struck this year. Now even high-end restaurants in luxury hotels resorted to those as eating out took a nosedive and is yet to return to anywhere near the pre-covid levels. For example, Swiggy rolled out a Marriott-on-wheels with menus and prices tailored for delivery at home. Marriott could launch online-only brands whose specs varied from those of its on-premise dining.

“We help create new brands out of the existing kitchens of fine-dining restaurants,” says Vishal Bhatia, CEO, Swiggy New Supply. “For example, a premium restaurant for Chinese cuisine can use the same infrastructure to produce mass Chinese brands. We can help with the catalogue, pricing and discounting for it.”

This helps restaurants find new consumers and partially offset the under-utilization of kitchen facilities and culinary staff. “Everyone’s volumes have dropped and they’re looking for new revenue avenues,” says Bhatia.

Swiggy has co-created nearly 200 brands since the launch of this model using existing kitchens of restaurants in

Blue Ridge Kitchen combines fine dining with comfort

As the server poured silky gazpacho over a chunk of lobster in the bowl before me, I suddenly realized how much I’ve been missing fine dining. After so many months of take-out meals or eating on casual patios, it was so nice to enjoy the upscale service offered at the new Blue Ridge Kitchen at the Barlow in Sebastopol.

After my first spoonful of the refreshing soup, I knew chef Matt D’Ambrosi is putting a lot of thought into his Cal-Creole-Cajun recipes. The chilled gazpacho is marvelous on its own, in a sweet-tart, peach-colored puree of melon and tomato dotted with radish, a round of chopped avocado and shiny drops of basil oil ($9). With the generous chunk of seafood (add $7) and the elegant tableside presentation, it’s luxurious.

All the details line up so well at this classy spot, which took over the former Zazu Farm + Restaurant space that was vacated in 2018. For now, we eat on the patio, a pretty area set with wood tables and European-style bistro chairs, all shaded by sailcloth and flanked by trees, herb gardens and flowers. I’m looking forward to when we can eat inside, too, and admire the centerpiece cocktail bar and the open kitchen.

D’Ambrosi was known for his creative cooking at Healdsburg’s Spoonbar, Harmon Guest House and Pizzando. Here, he comes up with inventive dishes like carrot cake pancakes. The brunch specialty makes a delicious statement; it’s a sweet but not sugary hybrid of carrot and apple soufflé cakes on a pond of cream cheese-poppy seed glaze and topped with golden raisins, candied pecans and smoked maple syrup ($18).

Overall, though, there’s nothing weird on this expansive, all-day menu. You can get something as simple as a perfect smash burger with secret sauce ($9.50) or as indulgent as

Reservations for November Living Kitchen dinners open Saturday | Dining



Living Kitchen (copy)

Chef Lisa Becklund (left) and Linda Ford operate Living Kitchen Farm and Dairy near Depew. Reservations for their farm-to-table dinners in November will open to the public Saturday, Oct. 3.




Living Kitchen Farm and Dairy will begin taking reservations for its November Farm Table Dinners at 7 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 3.

Living Kitchen offers seven- to nine-course tasting menus using ingredients grown, produced or foraged on the farm, or purchased from other local farms. The dinners are a community dining experience served at a common table on the screened-in back porch of a cabin on the farm’s property.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions, only 20 to 24 guests will be allowed to take part in each dinner, so the dinners will likely sell out even quicker than usual.

The November dinner schedule includes two meals: “Northwest Passage,” in which chef Lisa Becklund will combine special culinary delights from her hometown of Seattle with Oklahoma produce, which will be offered Nov. 6-7; and “The Feast Days,” which will focus on the bounty associated with Thanksgiving, and which will be offered Nov. 13-14 and 20-21.

Cost is $110 per person, which includes the dinner, nonalcoholic beverages and gratuity.

Reservations must be made through the Living Kitchen’s Tock page. To register and more information: livingkitchenfarmanddairy.com.

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