experience

Experience Quintessential Autumn at Portland Japanese Garden

  • The Famous Tree: From National Geographic to local photography shows, there’s one Japanese Maple inside the garden that is said to be the most photographed tree in America.
  • Repeat Visits are Rewarded: Portland Japanese Garden’s hilly topography means each tree in the garden has its own “moment in the sun” and progresses towards autumn splendor on its own timeline. So literally and philosophically, you won’t get the same view twice throughout the month of October.
  • Take Your Time: The Garden’s meandering paths force you to stroll slowly and notice the exquisite colors, and textures in each of the eight different garden spaces. Says Garden Curator Sadafumi Uchiyama, “Autumn is like the last bit of excitement and you enjoy the last minutes of nature before things slow down.”
  • Embracing Impermanence: In Japan, seasons are revered for their impermanence, highlighting the fragile beauty of life. “Seeing fall colors in a Japanese garden gives you a sense of connection to something bigger than yourself,” says CEO Steve Bloom. “The fleeting nature of peak fall foliage only heightens its anticipation.”

And when is peak time to see the leaves? It depends on many factors like weather and the hilly microclimate. While the City of Portland is vibrant and full of colors, Portland Japanese Garden takes just a few weeks longer to reach peak color, which typically lands in the last two weeks of October.

Portland Japanese Garden is open Wednesday-Monday and closed Tuesdays. Adult admission is $18.95, $16.95 for seniors (65+), $15.25 for students with ID, $13.50 for youths aged 6-17. Children under five are free. Tickets can be purchased at tickets.japanesegarden.org

Media Contacts: 
Megumi Kato | 503-542-0288| [email protected]   
Lisa Christy | 503-328-0050 | [email protected]

SOURCE Portland Japanese Garden

Related Links

http://japanesegarden.com/

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White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms

White House staffers were urged in an email Sunday to “please stay home” and “do not come to work” if they have exhibited any symptoms of the coronavirus.

An all-staff email obtained by New York Magazine’s Olivia Nuzzi directed members of the White House staff to “immediately contact your primary care provider” and “inform their supervisors” in the event of symptoms being presented.

“If you or your colleagues believe that you should be practicing telework, or have questions about your ability to do so, please contact your supervisor,” the email reads.

The guidance for White House employees came almost three days after the president announced his own diagnosis of COVID-19, along with his wife’s, shortly after the confirmation that Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksDoctors, White House staff offer conflicting messages on president’s health Trump given second dose of Remdesivir ‘without complication’, ‘not yet out of the woods’, Conley says Barr will not quarantine following potential exposure to COVID-19 MORE, his longtime aide, had tested positive.

It also comes amid a whirlwind of criticism centered around the White House and allies of the president surrounding the president’s longstanding resistance against publicly taking measures to prevent the spread of the virus; Trump has frequently made public appearances at rallies and various

Giant drive-thru haunted house experience opens in Bay Area

Talk about a scary moment.

The Fields family was facing the real possibility of having to cancel its annual Pirates of Emerson Halloween haunt at the Alameda County Fairgrounds, unable make dollars and sense of the reduced capacity and other social distancing restrictions that would need to be in place this year.

“We wouldn’t have been able to put the numbers through to justify opening up,” says Brian Fields, who has helped run this popular haunt with his parents, Patty and Karl, for 29 years.

Instead of throwing in the towel, they decided to do something different — something bold — that would work in this COVID-19 age.

“Being the creative family that we are, my dad Karl, Patty and myself put our heads together and came up with this idea of doing this drive-thru,” Fields says.

So load up the car, remember to buckle in tight and get ready to be scared as the Pirates of Emerson evolves into something new for 2020. This massive drive-thru haunt, which covers nearly 10 acres at the Pleasanton fairgrounds, opens to the public on Oct. 2 and runs Thursday through Sunday through Nov. 1.

  • PLEASANTON, CA – SEPTEMBER 22: Brian Fields, vice president of operations for the Pirates of Emerson Haunted Themed Park, stands next to a structure he built to be used at the drive-thru haunted house at the Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020. This year, due to COVID-19 precautions, the longtime Halloween favorite has become a haunted house drive-thru. Vehicles will wind their way through a marked path as they view themed frights while listening to a soundtrack on the radio. The haunted drive-thru opens on Friday, Oct. 2. All tickets must be purchased in advance. (Doug Duran/Bay Area News Group)

  • PLEASANTON, CA –