Fail

Speaker Pelosi, House Democrats leave town, fail the American people

Wheels up, off to California after adjourning the House until after Election Day. It’s a shameful display of partisanship in the wake of our recovery from the coronavirus. Rather than help small businesses continue to access unused funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP lawmaker calls on Pelosi to apologize for response to Trump contracting coronavirus Pelosi: ‘We’re making progress’ on coronavirus relief bill What President Trump’s positive COVID test could mean for the markets MORE (D-Calif.) is willing to block reasonable relief efforts, all in the name of politics. She doesn’t want to risk President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE and congressional Republicans getting an ounce of credit in the final weeks of this election.

Some things are simply more important than political posturing, like ensuring American small businesses can weather the storm of the coronavirus pandemic. We have unspent funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, a COVID relief program that saved 51 million jobs in the United States, 2 million in Ohio alone. Its authorization is expiring, meaning the program is closing up shop, despite $138 billion left in the coffers. My Ohio colleague, Rep Steve ChabotSteven (Steve) Joseph ChabotKate Schroder in Ohio among Democratic challengers squelching GOP hopes for the House Centrist Democrats ‘strongly considering’ discharge petition on GOP PPP bill Lawmakers call for expanded AI role in education, business to remain competitive MORE, has a simple, straightforward bill that reauthorizes the unspent funds through the end of the year, expands the eligible entities and expenses, and further protects the program so

House Democrats Prep to Pass Stimulus Bill That is Dead with GOP if Talks Fail

Once again, House Democrats are preparing to go it alone.



a group of people standing next to a person in a suit and tie: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) talk with members of Congress following ceremonies honoring late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC.


© Photo by Jonathan Ernst – Pool/Getty
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) talk with members of Congress following ceremonies honoring late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC.

Amid renewed negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, the House postponed plans Wednesday evening to vote on a trimmed-down $2.2 trillion stimulus package until Thursday to “give further room for talks,” a Democratic aide told Newsweek.

Democrats have dubbed the new proposal the Heroes Act 2.0, which they unveiled this week after the last few months failed to produce a bipartisan agreement for another pandemic relief measure.

If a deal is not reached, the Democratic measure is expected to pass along mostly party lines. The proposal offers political cover for Democrats headed into tough re-elections on November 3, as moderates have grown increasingly anxious over Congress’ stimulus inaction. The lack of progress has resulted in mounting pressure on Pelosi to allow another vote on some form of pandemic relief.

The new $2.2 trillion Heroes Act, which is scaled back from the old $3.4 trillion Heroes Act that the House passed in May, includes a second round of $1,200 checks, a $600 weekly federal supplement to unemployment insurance, $225 billion for education, $436 billion for state and local governments, food aid, airline industry assistance and Paycheck Protection Program funding.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell reiterated that legislation of such size and cost is out of the question for Republicans, accusing it of being riddled with “poison pills.” GOP lawmakers want a more tailored measure, such as the roughly $500 billion package Senate Democrats blocked Republicans from advancing