Fire

Kitchen fire damages El Cajon apartment units, 20 residents displaced

EL CAJON, Calif. (CNS) – An unattended kitchen stove was blamed for an apartment fire in El Cajon Tuesday evening that caused damage to six apartments and displaced at least 20 residents.

Deputies responded to the 400 block of East Bradley Avenue, near Magnolia Avenue, about 7:25 p.m. and found a second story apartment fully engulfed in flames, according to Sgt. Patrick Fox of the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department.

The fire immediately threatened at least 10 apartments, all of which were evacuated, and an additional 10 apartments directly south of where the fire occurred were evacuated as a precaution, Fox said.

Firefighters from the San Miguel, Santee and El Cajon fire departments were able to extinguish the flames and deputies learned no one was inside the apartment when the fire started, he said.

The occupants of the apartment where the fire began were interviewed by authorities and it was determined the kitchen stove was left on and unattended, sparking the fire, Fox said.

No injuries were reported, but one apartment was damaged by fire, one unit sustained water damage and four others sustained water and smoke damage, Fox said.

Residents of the 10 apartments south of where the fire started were allowed to return home, but about 20 residents from the other 10 apartments remained evacuated due to the power in those units being turned off. San Diego Gas & Electric crews were working to restore power, Fox said.

The Red Cross set up a temporary staging area for affected residents in the Kelly’s Pub parking lot, 719 E. Bradley Ave.

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Fire safety tips | wfmynews2.com

Fire officials say cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — National Fire Prevention Week runs from October 4th to October 10th. This year’s campaign is titled “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen.” It’s geared towards educating everyone about the simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves, and those around them, safe in the kitchen.

Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. The horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.

Since 1922, the National Fire Protection Association has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. During the campaign each year, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters also provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.

According to the NFPA, fire fighters responded to an estimated 1.3 million fires in the U.S. last year. Those fires caused roughly 3,700 deaths and more than 16,000 reported injuries. Statistics also show home fires were reported every 93 seconds. Fire officials say cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen. 

Real fire demo shows public dangers in the kitchen and how to prevent a blaze

GOLDEN, Colo. (KDVR) — The Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control (DFPC) presented a real-fire demonstration to remind people the dangers of simply preparing a meal in your kitchen. 

It can happen quite literally in a flash. That’s why the DFPC teamed up with the Fairmount Fire Protection District to cook up a little demo.

“It’s important that we be safe in the kitchen,” said DFPC Section Chief Christopher Brunette.

It was the perfect place for the fire show: the Fairmount Fire Training Facility just outside Golden.

Under the watchful eyes of fire fighting professionals, fires were intentionally set in a controlled environment, all to send a message:

“Thanksgiving is our biggest day for home fires and so if we can start to illuminate those fires and teach people how to be proactive and safe in the kitchen, then we can illuminate a lot of the casualties,” Brunette said.

The fires here were easily ignited and put out, but the one that starts in your home — not so easy.

Some things to keep in mind while you’re in the kitchen, cooking up your favorite dish:

“You need to keep a three-foot radius around the cooking area. Don’t leave any cooking unattended,” Brunette said.

What about soup? 

“You absolutely can burn soup,” Brunette said.

And if your stove fire starts to get out of hand, put a lid on it, literally. If that doesn’t work, call 911.

Source Article

Kitchen safety, alarms key to fire prevention

Forty per cent of residential fires in Fort St. John over the past five years did not have working smoke alarms.

It’s an alarming statistic as firefighters mark Fire Prevention Week Oct. 4 to 10, put on by the Office of the Fire Commissioner and this year focused on kitchen safety.

Fire Prevention Officer Capt. Marco D’Agostino says the theme is highly relevant, with residents staying home due to the ongoing pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has kept many of us at home more often this year, so this year’s Fire Prevention Week of Serving Up Safety in the Kitchen is extremely relevant,” said D’Agostino, noting that smoke alarms are crucial for fire prevention.

The fire department has issued the following kitchen safety tips:

The department is celebrating Fire Prevention Week a little differently this year, serving up safety tips by producing their own video on kitchen safety. D’Agostino says the department has pushed their campaign to the digital sphere.

“This year is a little different with COVID, we didn’t do a kickoff, and we’re not going to the schools to do our talks. We still have publications and printed materials going out, but we did produce our own video,” he said. “It’s a way to get the message out there.”

The video can be found on the city’s website and YouTube page.

Email reporter Tom Summer at [email protected]

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JBLM serves up fire safety in the kitchen | Article

By Edward Chavez, Joint Base Lewis-McChord Fire PreventionOctober 5, 2020

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. – The Joint Base Lewis-McChord Fire Prevention Office, in conjunction with the National Fire Protection Association, is celebrating National Fire Prevention Week Oct. 4-10. The theme this year is “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen.”According to NFPA, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Almost half (44%) of all reported home fires start in the kitchen. Two-thirds (66%) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food and/or other cooking materials.“We know cooking fires can be prevented,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice-president of outreach and advocacy. “Staying in the kitchen, using a timer and avoiding distractions such as electronics or TV are steps everyone can take to keep families safe in their homes.”The JBLM Fire Prevention Office believes the most important action you can take is to “serve up fire safety in the kitchen” as cooking fires can grow quickly. Several homes on base have been damaged over the years, along with family members injured, by fires that could have easily been prevented.NFPA wants to share these safety tips to keep you from having a cooking fire.Never leave cooking food unattended. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling or broiling. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.If you are simmering, baking, roasting or boiling food, check it regularly. Remain in the home while food is cooking and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.Be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medication or have consumed alcohol.Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when cooking. If you experience a grease fire, slide the lid over the