green

Kick-start your veggie garden with Simply Green digital magazine



a bowl of fruit and vegetable salad


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The much-loved Simply Green digital magazine has been relaunched with its first edition – which looks at food gardening – going live Friday.

Editor Vivian Warby says she and her team are excited to bring the eco-conscious magazine back at a time when there is a growing number of people becoming more aware of the importance of living a sustainable life.

The team chose “growing your own food” as the theme for the first edition because “the appetite for urban food gardening has outlasted lockdown level 5 and today there are avid urban gardeners eating from their bounty planted in hard lockdown and new gardeners planting for the future”.

“We, at Simply Green, are thrilled about this positive sustainable element – an offshoot of the pandemic and we wanted to offer a simple guide to those wanting to start out on the journey,” says Warby.

“I hope you will find the magazine inspirational and empowering, as we start this journey together to make this a better, kinder and more sustainable world.”

In this edition – launched to coincide with the country’s celebration of Garden Day on Sunday – you will learn the basics of growing your own veggies in your backyard or on your balcony with topics ranging from composting to raised beds to vermiculture and permaculture to what to plant now.

“We have also included some delicious recipes to show you how simple it is to go from garden to plate.”

The magazine features The African Cookbook author Portia Mbau and her daughter Lumai de Smidt of the famous Instagram account @food.of.africa – on their garden-to-plate journey; and also delicious garden-to-plate recipes from well-known author/chef Sophia Lindop – author of the Lebanese cookbook Going Home

Was Donald Trump’s White House Video Filmed in Front of Green Screen?

President Donald Trump released a video message on Twitter on Thursday discussing his health and the treatment he received following his COVID-19 diagnosis.



a man wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump gestures upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus. Trump's recent video led to speculation about a green screen.


© Win McNamee/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus. Trump’s recent video led to speculation about a green screen.

In the video, Trump stands in the White House grounds. There was immediate speculation that the president was not in fact outside but had used a green screen to produce a false background.

The Claim:

Social media users raised the question of a green screen once Trump tweeted his video yesterday. The claim soon gained traction on Twitter and some prominent people began asking the question. Apparent distortions in the video, like the shadows and the background appearing to be on a loop, prompted the comments.

A Garden Center’s Worth of Trees and Bushes Have Transformed the Street Outside Old Town Brewing Into a Green Escape

In most instances when you run up against one of those white- and safety-orange-striped “Road Closed” barricades, heavy equipment is on the other side ripping into the pavement, frustrating drivers now in need of another route along with neighbors who must put up with the sustained din of construction.

At Old Town Brewing’s Northeast Portland location, these blockades actually seal off a tranquil urban thicket right in the middle of the street.

This past summer saw every bar, brewery and restaurant in town expand into lanes of traffic if they had the means and ability. While many of these makeshift pandemic patios are nothing much to look at, Old Town’s is different: It immerses you in nature.

“I think one of the things that made such a drastic improvement were all of the trees,” says owner Adam Milne. “It made Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard look like a park. It’s beautiful.”

The temporary woodland—just off the major thoroughfare on Northeast Sumner Street—took more to create than just a run to the closest big-box store’s garden department. The trees are actually loaners from the city of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services as part of its effort to partner with the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Healthy Business program. And the agency didn’t just pick whatever extra available shrubs happened to be in storage, either—careful planning went into the selection of each flower and frond for Old Town and the newly launched Dream Street Plaza it’s a part of.

“They sent out an arborist who walked through the place to develop a ‘tree site plan’ to help support the goals of the plaza,” says PBOT spokesperson Hannah Schafer.

The plaza, which had its grand opening Oct. 2, is the result of a $25,000 National Association of City Transportation Officials grant that PBOT won