heres

Here’s What You Should Know Before Selling a Furnished Home

Selling your home is a huge endeavor — so big that you might not think of all the details surrounding the sale, such as the home’s furnishings. If you’re looking to maximize profits, consider selling your furniture, because it’s worth something too. But is this the right move for you?

Making a furniture plan

Furniture is often an afterthought in the home selling process. But it’s a big consideration and deserves some thought before you list. Here are some possibilities for what to do with it:

  • Sell your furniture with the home.
  • Bring it with you when you move.
  • Have an estate or garage sale.
  • List it online, such as on Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) Marketplace or Craigslist.
  • Sell it through a consignment sale.
  • Donate it.

Let’s explore what you should know about selling a furnished home. If you decide that isn’t your best option, you can always choose one (or a combination) of the other choices.

Sell your furniture with the home

This method works best when you have furniture people want. For people to want the home furnished, your home with your furniture in it should look as good as a staged home does, so your furniture needs to be in good condition and have a cohesive look that fits well in the home. Also, the rooms should be uncluttered.

Note that if your furnishings are not up to par and you try to sell the home furnished, you might be repelling, instead of attracting, possible buyers. If you’re unsure, enlist the help of a professional decorator.

Markets where selling furnished works best

One market where a furnished home is more popular is the second home or vacation property market. More buyers want a furnished home when they’re buying the property as a vacation home or as a vacation

Here’s What $2K Rent Gets You In Pandemic-Hit Hell’s Kitchen

HELL’S KITCHEN, NY — As the coronavirus pandemic introduces uncertainty into New York City’s real estate climate, Patch is providing a glance into what $2,000 rent can currently get you in Hell’s Kitchen.

One example: this studio rental on West 49th Street. Fully furnished, the apartment is part of the Residences at Worldwide Plaza, sitting in the shadow of the distinctive green-roofed skyscraper. Amenities include a 24-hour doorman, laundry rooms on each floor and a New York Sports Club Gym, according to the listing.

More info:

  • Address: 393 W 49th St Apt 4MM
  • Price: $2,000/month
  • Bedrooms: 0
  • Bathrooms: 1
  • Features: Fully furnished, short- or long-term studio rental with a lovely garden
    facing balcony. This is a perfect alternative to a long-stay hotel. Convenient midtown location, near Rockefeller Center, Times Square, Lincoln Center, Hudson Yards and all subway lines and the cross-town bus. NO FEE The Residences at Worldwide Plaza is a full service condominium located in the heart of Hell’s Kitchen. Amenities include a 24-hour doorman and concierge, on-site management, resident manager, and laundry rooms on each floor. A David Barton designed 40,000 sq. ft. gym Elite New York Sports Club gym complete with saltwater pool. There is also direct building access to parking. NO FEE

This listing originally appeared on realtor.com. For more information and photos, click here.

Source Article

Here’s The Interior That Acura Hopes Will Help The New MDX Stand Out

We’ve got new generations of the Mercedes-Benz GLS, Mercedes GLA, Nissan Rogue and Ford Explorer, in addition to entirely new cars like the Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Genesis GV80 and Ford Bronco, so a new fourth-generation Acura MDX arrives in the face of plentiful competition. I’m probably forgetting a lot of others! Sheesh, do automakers ever know where the money is.



a close up of a car


© Photo: Acura


This blog, specifically, is about the MDX, new photos of which Acura released this week. The images show an updated interior for a vehicle that Acura says is intended to be its flagship. The 2021 MDX prototype — what the production version will look like more or less — will debut in full next week. But with the interior photos we get a glimpse of Acura’s next play in a very, very crowded marketplace, where every automaker seems determined to show off their newest Sunday best.

The MDX’s competitors are cars like the BMW X5, Audi Q7, Infiniti QX60 and Mercedes GLE, two of which — the X5 and GLE — were also updated in the past couple of years. You’d almost think that automakers know what really sells in the American marketplace.

Acura sold 52,019 MDXs last year, a 1 percent improvement over 2018. And while that number will probably shrink for 2020 because of (gestures to everything), it will probably still sell enough to be Acura’s second biggest seller in the U.S., behind the RDX, its little brother, as it was last year. The MDX will also get, as is necessary, some new interior tech that you will instantly forget:

Signature Acura technologies debuting in the new MDX Prototype will include the Acura Precision Cockpit™ all-digital driver’s meter, an ultra-wide full-HD center display and a next-level, 25-speaker “Signature Edition” ELS Studio 3D® premium audio system

Here’s why Ohio lawmakers haven’t done anything about scandal-tainted House Bill 6 so far

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Following the July arrest of then-House Speaker Larry Householder on a charge he oversaw a bribery scheme to pass House Bill 6, dozens of Ohio lawmakers quickly signed on as co-sponsors of bills to repeal the tainted energy law.

But months later, it’s still unclear what, if anything, the Republican-dominated Ohio General Assembly will do about HB6 before the legislative session ends in December and the public starts paying for a $1 billion-plus bailout of two nuclear power plants in January.

The main reason, lawmakers and observers say, is because – much like congressional Republicans’ unsuccessful attempts to repeal Obamacare in 2017 – there’s no consensus among GOP lawmakers on what, if anything, to replace HB6 with.

Some favor a straight repeal of HB6. Others think it should be replaced, and at least a few believe nothing at all should be done to alter it.

“They are all over the place,” said state Rep. Mark Romanchuk of Richland County about his fellow Republicans.

There are other reasons as well. Even Republicans who favor repealing and replacing House Bill 6 say they need time to study HB6, an enormously complex law that goes far beyond the nuclear bailout, and make sure that any changes they make to it won’t have unintended consequences for Ohioans.

Another factor is that the Senate appears to be leaving it up to the House to decide what to do, as HB6 originated in that chamber. And the House is led by Bob Cupp, a newly elected House speaker who is living up to his reputation for acting deliberatively.

“You’ve got Republicans in the caucus who think ‘This is all just going to blow over — if we just stonewall for long enough, people will forget about it,’” said state Rep. David Leland, a Columbus Democrat.

This ecologist was told she could keep her natural garden. Here’s why she’s fighting city hall anyway

An ecologist is challenging Toronto’s long grass and weed bylaw, even though the city exempted her from having to cut down her natural garden — which is home to tall shrubs and trees, as well as butterflies and chipmunks.

Nina-Marie Lister, an ecology and urban planning professor at Ryerson University, says she never asked for an exemption and she rejects it. Instead, she and her lawyer are arguing that the bylaw itself is unconstitutional and outdated, saying it goes against the city’s own pollinator protection and biodiversity strategies.

“[The current bylaw] really stands in the way of individual citizens on a small patch of yard trying to do the right thing at a time of biodiversity collapse and climate crisis,” said Lister, who was also a consultant on the city’s own biodiversity strategy.

The two are now drafting a replacement bylaw to present to the city this fall.

Lister and her family have been tending the garden at her home near Davenport Road and Christie Street for the past five years. It includes a front-yard meadow, a green roof and around 100 different species of plants, shrubs and trees, most of which are native to Ontario.

Nina-Marie Lister’s natural garden is home to about 100 different species of trees, plants and shrubs. (Lorraine Johnson)

“In the work that I do, it would be very odd for me not to have a garden that was full of life, rich in biodiversity and frankly, one that gives us enormous benefit as a community,” Lister said.

Lister, who is also and the director of Ryerson’s Ecological Design Lab, says the garden holds storm water, controls runoff and provides habitat for various birds and at-risk insects like monarch butterflies. It’s also been home to other creatures, including frogs, rabbits and chipmunks.

Plus, she says,