Hill

Workshop/APD and April Bovet Interior Design Team Up on a Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Gem

In the dining room, Eoos chairs ring a custom concrete table beneath a Rich Brilliant Willing pendant fixture. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Each of the five boroughs contains a constellation of neighborhoods with their own cultural quirks and pervading personalities. In Cobble Hill, ethnically diverse mom-and-pop shops and traditional brownstones entwine with a boho art scene, yielding an old-school yet forward-thinking Brooklyn vibe. It’s here that Workshop/APD founding principal Andrew Kotchen was given the opportunity to nestle a unique piece of architecture between two 1900s town houses, at once putting into relief the district’s dual natures.

GamFratesi stools pull up to the kitchen’s granite-topped island. Photography by Donna Dotan.

“It’s rare to get the chance to run an intelligent design process that isn’t based in historical preservation,” Kotchen says of the ground-up plan he conceived for his client, a married couple with two teenage children. After performing initial zoning studies, he and the WAPD team demolished the existing residence and inserted a modernist glass-and-steel town house, encompassing 7,000 square feet and four bedrooms across six floors. “We didn’t set out to take up every inch of buildable square footage,” Kotchen continues. “The focus was on creating comfortable, livable rooms.” Leveraging ideas from past projects with this client, he has devised, in its “calming simplicity,” an exemplar of the contemporary urban home.

White-oak built-ins backdrop an Antonio Citterio sofa and ottoman in the living room. Photography by Donna Dotan.

The streamlined program begins with a triple-height entry atrium that references elements from the facade. A screen of ebonized-oak slats rises the full 31 feet and then crosses the ceiling, the orientations nodding to the exterior’s vertical windows and horizontal Belgian bricks, which extend into the entry. Furthermore, the slat color links to the blackened steel framing those windows. It

Oliver Jackson-Cohen on Building His Own ‘Bly Manor’ Villain and Those ‘Hill House’ Comparisons

From ELLE

Spoilers for The Haunting of Bly Manor episode 7, “The Two Faces, Part Two,” below.

The Haunting of Bly Manor has no shortage of ghosts, apparitions and otherworldly villains, most of them working both as literal threats and metaphorical representations of guilt, grief, and denial. But the most memorable and complex of all the baddies haunting Bly Manor is Peter Quint, a suave Glaswegian valet who’s hiding a whole host of dark secrets behind his rakish smile.

After briefly appearing as a frightening specter haunting the manor, Quint is introduced in episode 3, “The Two Faces, Part One,” as a fantasy of an urbane 1980s man, shopping for tailored menswear and premium whiskey in west London to the sounds of Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love.” Even as the fantasy is undercut with the revelation that the luxury goods are for his boss, Henry Wingrave (Henry Thomas), Peter still retains an air of effortless confidence. That easy surface charm belies a dark, singleminded determination to get ahead at all costs—and to escape his own past, no matter who he takes down in the process. That charm also enthralls Wingrave’s newly hired au pair, Rebecca Jessel (Tahirah Sharif), whose tumultuous affair with Quint ends up destroying her.

Jackson-Cohen speaks to ELLE.com about Quint’s toxic relationship with Rebecca, the machismo he wears as a mask, and how he compares to The Haunting of Hill House‘s Luke Crain.

Luke really goes through the wringer in The Haunting of Hill House—heroin addiction, deep grief, a near-death experience—so you had a lot of heavy stuff to play. When you were approached to return for Bly Manor, was it important to you that Peter Quint be a very different kind of character?

On Hill House, Mike [Flanagan, series creator] used to always

S.F. interior designer Jeff Schlarb conceptualizes penthouse in Nob Hill

A resplendent penthouse in Nob Hill awaits its next owner and showcases the vision of San Francisco-based interior designer Jeff Schlarb. Crowning the Crescent, the city’s newest collection of boutique residences, the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse that’s listed for $7.1 million is an artistic, inspirational oasis with more than 1,800 square feet of living space and 925 square feet of exterior space, with views of the Transamerica Pyramid, San Francisco Bay and Coit Tower.

“My vision in designing the penthouse at Crescent was to imagine a resident feeling inspired every time they enter their home,” Schlarb said. “We kept drawing upon the idea of creating a custom, romantic space that feels exciting and familiar at the same time, straddling a careful balance of maximalism and softness while honoring the unparalleled architecture and world-class design of this one-of-a-kind building and its residences. The color palette, in particular, draws upon nature and complements the stunning sky and bay sightlines visible from terraces that span the home.”

Schlarb furnished and designed the elegant penthouse, which complements the building’s architecture and features a flowing floor plan awash in natural light. The refined interior embodies California lifestyle through its sophisticated, stylish material palette and thoughtful design scheme.

The Crescent is the work of Grosvenor Americas, which is part of the Grosvenor Group and one of the world’s largest privately-owned property companies.

“We are excited to debut this model penthouse at Crescent, which is an idyllic interpretation of a contemporary luxury retreat located in one of the world’s greatest neighborhoods,” said Steve Buster, Senior Vice President of Development for Grosvenor Americas. “The home is an indoor-outdoor top-floor oasis, as residents have a privately accessed sprawling rooftop terrace overlooking downtown San Francisco and the Bay, along with two private terraces immediately off the living spaces. Crescent’s model penthouse

Victoria Pedretti talks about Bly Manor’s hidden meanings and comparisons to Hill House

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

From Digital Spy

The Haunting of Bly Manor and Hill House spoilers follow.

Victoria Pedretti already had a few independent film credits to her name, but it was her turn as Eleanor “Nell” Crain (and the bone-chilling Bent-Neck Lady) in Netflix’s hit horror series The Haunting of Hill House that would prove to be her big break.

Not only was this acknowledged through award nominations, but Pedretti has continued to land starring roles in other popular shows – such as Netflix’s You – and on the big screen, taking on Mason family member Leslie Van Houten (better known as Lulu) in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

We recently had a phone interview with the star to talk about her most recent project: a return to the Haunting anthology with Bly Manor.

A loose adaptation of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, The Haunting of Bly Manor is narratively completely different to Hill House. It did, however, bring back much of its main cast. Alongside Victoria Pedretti, Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Henry Thomas and Kate Siegel are among the returning faces.

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

“It was an extremely different experience to Hill House,” Victoria Pedretti says of filming, during an exclusive chat with Digital Spy. “Compared to the first season, where Mike Flanagan directed every single one of the episodes, this season he directed the first episode and then we had all of these wonderful directors come in to work with us for the rest of them.”

The leading lady, who plays Bly Manor’s new au pair Dani Clayton, notes how “incredible” and “unique” they all were, but also reveals how each new director changed the process.

“The director’s work differently… So yeah that definitely kept us on our toes. It was kind of

How the Show Links to ‘Haunting of Hill House’

The Haunting of Bly Manor is Netflix’s early Halloween treat from the makers of the terrifying The Haunting of Hill House. This time, we are in an entirely new house, meaning we are leaving the Crain family behind and heading into a new story of spooks and specters.

The Haunting looks set to be an anthology series, with each season telling a new standalone story—like American Horror Story‘s early seasons, before the show started linking its stories together.

Like American Horror Story, however, what links The Haunting of Bly Manor and The Haunting of Hill House is the team both behind and in front of the camera. Both shows are written by Mike Flanagan, the writer and director behind Gerald’s Game and Doctor Sleep. Flanagan also directed all of Hill House and the first episode of Bly Manor.

Both shows also share a number of cast members. The main actors who are back for Bly Manor are:

  • Victoria Pederetti (Nell Crain in Hill House)
  • Oliver Jackson-Cohen (Luke Crain)
  • Kate Siegel (Theodora Crain)
  • Henry Thomas (Hugh Crain)
  • Catherine Parker (Poppy Hill)
the haunting of bly manor hill house
‘The Haunting of Bly Manor’ tells a new story from ‘The Haunting of Hill House’.
Netflix

However, they are playing entirely new characters rather than the Crain family (and in Parker’s case, Poppy Hill). The new story is led by Pedretti playing Dai Clayton, a young American woman hired as a governess at Bly Manor to care for two young children, Miles and Flora.

Among these cast members will be the return of a more unwelcome set of characters. Just like the Hill House, Bly Manor features dozens of horrifying ghosts hidden among the episodes for eagle-eyed viewers of the Netflix show to spot.

If the plot of Bly Manor sounds familiar to Victorian