Honors

Bloomberg ‘Awards’ C8 Corvette Worst Interior of the Year Honors

C8 Corvette Stingray

While everyone else praises the C8 Corvette cabin, one news site throws serious shade on the entire design.

Ever since the C8 Corvette debuted, we’ve yet to find one critical or negative review regarding the latest generation of GM’s legendary sports car. That is, until now. While everyone else on earth seemingly loves the C8’s revised interior, Bloomberg apparently feels much differently. In fact, they went so far as to name the new Corvette’s cabin one of the “worst car interiors of the year,” which seems a bit extreme.

Bloomberg preempts their critical review by saying that the C8 is “not a bad car,” and notes that it’s “among the most athletic, fun-to-drive vehicles on the market today.” Regardless, they claim that the Corvette’s interior is “likely to leave you feeling stressed, confused, or disappointed.” All we can say is – there’s a first time for everything, and a critic born every minute. But let’s dive into what supposedly makes the C8’s cabin such a let down.

C8 Corvette Interior

Bloomberg admits that their take on the C8 Corvette is going to be polarizing, but they use the same word to describe its interior. They aren’t fans of the big button-laden divider in the center, which they say is “covered in low-grade leather” and looks like something more at home on a spaceship from Star Trek.

C8 Corvette Interior

Bloomberg feels like this great divide results in a cabin with “no flow, no fluidity, in the space between the driver and passenger.” They feel like it makes reaching the infotainment screen impossible while driving, and that the overall design is a big departure from what every other automaker is doing these days.

C8 Corvette Interior

And that isn’t the only gripe. Bloomberg hates the square steering wheel, saying it “looks as if it were borrowed from Buick.”

‘The Farm,’ a healing garden at Pennington Cancer Center, honors a beloved wife, mother and friend | Home/Garden

Charlotte Ferguson Murrell loved the outdoors — gardening, raising chickens and working on the tract of land, where she and her husband, George, raised their three children.

The former pediatric nurse also loved her coffee club of friends, close for more than 30 years.

When the 54-year-old Murrell died two years ago from colon cancer, some coffee club members decided, as a memorial, to spruce up the coffee service at the Baton Rouge General Pennington Cancer Center of Bluebonnet Boulevard, where the young wife and mother had spent many hours in treatment.

Then George Murrell designated the cancer center as a place where friends and family members could make donations in his wife’s memory.

The money poured in.

“It was unlike anything we have seen,” said Erik Showalter, president of the Baton Rouge General Foundation. “Contributions came from all over the country.”

That’s when the small, thoughtful project grew into a big, thought-filled project that patients and families will enjoy for many years to come.

“Our little coffee service project snowballed into a lovely healing garden,” said Leslie Gladney, who worked on the project with fellow coffee clubbers Pamela Gladney, Cheryl Kirchoff and Connie Miller.

The garden is nestled in a space between the buildings that house Pennington’s Infusion Center and the oncology waiting room at the Baton Rouge General Medical Center, just off Bluebonnet Boulevard. 

A balm to the senses, the garden is filled with white and pink flowers including a Natchez crepe myrtle, sweet olives, boxwoods, hydrangeas, foxtail ferns, azaleas, Shi Shi camellias, yew and agapanthus, along with blooming annuals. 

“The plan is to have something blooming year-round and something with a soft scent year-round,” Leslie Gladney said.

They’ve even given the tranquil spot a name.

“Charlotte was a farm girl, so we decided to call the garden

Ruth Bancroft Garden Honors Curator’s 40 Years Of Service

WALNUT CREEK, CA — Forty years into his dream job, Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery curator Brian Kemble is never entirely alone in his head as he goes about planting, hybridizing, photographing, documenting and building databases. He is still channeling, on a daily basis, the lovely, cactus-crazed lady who inspired, then hired him, back in 1980.

Kemble, 75, is the designated keeper of the flame lit by the late Ruth Bancroft, who over the course of decades turned her 3.5-acre plot of land in Walnut Creek into a world-renowned showcase for the variety, hardiness and beauty of ornamental, drought-tolerant plants.

A couple of weeks ago, Kemble’s colleagues at the garden surprised him by drilling a plaque in his honor into a large boulder on the premises. He can’t tell you what it says, exactly, because he hasn’t actually read it yet. But he was both thrilled and, yet again, a bit flummoxed by the reminder.

“It made me feel very glad that my efforts in the garden were appreciated,” he said. “And it also brought back to me the great burden that I feel, having had Ruth turn over the planting of the garden to me and my responsibility for making sure that her vision is adhered to, and the garden is in a good direction for the future.”

Gretchen Bartzen, executive director of the garden, notes that it became a nonprofit open to the public in 1992 as the first project of The Garden Conservancy, a national organization to preserve private gardens for public use that was inspired by Bancroft herself, who died in 2017 at the age of 109.

Photo courtesy of Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery, via Bay City News

Bartzen cites two factors that render the garden unique: “It was, as far as we

Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nusery Honors Curator’s 40 Years Of Service

Forty years into his dream job, Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery curator Brian Kemble is never entirely alone in his head as he goes about planting, hybridizing, photographing, documenting and building databases. He is still channeling, on a daily basis, the lovely, cactus-crazed lady who inspired, then hired him, back in 1980.

Kemble, 75, is the designated keeper of the flame lit by the late Ruth Bancroft, who over the course of decades turned her 3.5-acre plot of land in Walnut Creek into a world-renowned showcase for the variety, hardiness and beauty of ornamental, drought-tolerant plants.

A couple of weeks ago, Kemble’s colleagues at the garden surprised him by drilling a plaque in his honor into a large boulder on the premises. He can’t tell you what it says, exactly, because he hasn’t actually read it yet. But he was both thrilled and, yet again, a bit flummoxed by the reminder.

“It made me feel very glad that my efforts in the garden were appreciated,” he said. “And it also brought back to me the great burden that I feel, having had Ruth turn over the planting of the garden to me and my responsibility for making sure that her vision is adhered to, and the garden is in a good direction for the future.”

Gretchen Bartzen, executive director of the garden, notes that it became a nonprofit open to the public in 1992 as the first project of The Garden Conservancy, a national organization to preserve private gardens for public use that was inspired by Bancroft herself, who died in 2017 at the age of 109.

Bartzen cites two factors that render the garden unique: “It was, as far as we know, one of the very first examples of an entirely drought-tolerant garden in the United States,” she said.