Infection

Trump no longer poses infection risk, White House doctor says

The CDC says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at or beyond that point when their symptoms ebb and they have gone at least 24 hours without a fever. But some severely ill patients may need to isolate for at least 20 days, the agency says.

Early in his illness, the president was given oxygen treatment as well as dexamethasone, a steroid normally reserved for severely ill Covid-19 patients with lung damage.

Conley also said the president’s medical team could not find any evidence that the coronavirus is replicating in his body, and the amount of virus present in Trump’s body has decreased over time.

But Conley did not say whether the president had tested negative for the virus, which could still be present in his body. And there is no FDA-authorized or approved test that can tell when a person is no longer contagious, making it hard to gauge the reliability of the tests that Conley cited in his memo.

The latest information still leaves out some crucial information for judging Trump’s health — such as the condition of his lungs, and whether he has any lingering damage from the virus.

Over the course of his infection, Trump received a combination of treatments that few if any other coronavirus patients have taken together. Although the FDA has authorized broad emergency use of one drug — the antiviral remdesivir — and dexamethasone has been on the market for decades, Trump also received an unproven antibody treatment made by Regeneron.

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Trump Returns To White House, Removes Mask Despite Infection : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

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President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

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President Trump, who spent the weekend in the hospital being treated for COVID-19, made a theatrical return to the White House Monday evening, disembarking Marine One and walking the staircase to the South Portico entrance, where he turned to face the cameras, removed his mask and gave his signature two thumbs up.

Shortly before, a masked Trump had emerged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was receiving treatment, pumping his fist and giving a thumbs up as he ignored questions from reporters.

In a video recorded at the White House which he tweeted later, the president seemed somewhat more circumspect about a virus that he has often downplayed, along with measures to halt its spread, such as wearing masks.

Trump thanked the staff of Walter Reed and said that during his three-night stay he had “learned so much about coronavirus.”

“One thing that’s for certain – don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it. You’re going to beat it,” he said. “We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines. All developed recently. And you’re going to beat it.”

“I went, I didn’t feel so good,” he said, but added that, “And two days ago, I could have left two days ago. Two days ago I felt great, like better than

All of the contradictions surrounding Trump’s COVID-19 infection

  • Since the news broke that President Donald Trump contracted COVID-19, accurate information about his illness has been hard to come by.
  • White House officials and the president’s doctors have not been straightforward about the Trump’s condition and the timeline of his diagnosis.
  • Here is a breakdown of their contradictions so far.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

News broke that President Donald Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus with a tweet he posted at 12:54 a.m. ET on Friday. In the days since, statements from the White House and Trump’s own physician have muddied the waters, and the public is still largely in the dark about the state of the president’s health.

Here is a breakdown of the contradictions and cover-ups surrounding Trump’s illness.

  • In an interview with Fox News on Thursday night, Trump told host Sean Hannity he had just learned that his adviser, Hope Hicks, tested positive for the virus. The White House has now acknowledged that at the time he spoke to Hannity, Trump had already tested positive himself on a rapid test and was awaiting results from a second test.
  • Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday afternoon, “out of an abundance of caution,” White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said at the time. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows later painted a dimmer picture of Trump’s health on Friday when he was hospitalized. “He had a fever and his blood oxygen level had dropped rapidly,” he told Fox News on Saturday evening.  
  • On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley told reporters that “yesterday and today” Trump had not been treated with supplemental oxygen. On Sunday, however, Conley disclosed that the president was indeed given oxygen: “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course

White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


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President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he

Trump Infection Puts Large Circle of White House Aides at Risk

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump interacted or traveled with a large coterie of top aides and advisers in the days before he was diagnosed with Covid-19, raising the risk of a widespread outbreak within the White House.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.


© Photographer: MANDEL NGAN/AFP
US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.

The circle of close contacts with the infected president and his wife, Melania, begins with his adviser Hope Hicks, who fell ill on Wednesday night. She traveled with Trump to the presidential debate on Tuesday and to campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday.

She was seen in close quarters with several other officials, including White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller.

Depending on how far the virus spreads through the halls of the West Wing and Congress, as well as the president’s campaign headquarters, much more than Trump’s travel schedule may be derailed. Face-to-face negotiations over another round of economic stimulus may be complicated, and the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

It wasn’t immediately clear when or how the president was infected and how many other White House aides will be asked to quarantine due to contact with the Trumps or Hicks. The typical incubation period for the virus, or time between exposure and emergence of symptoms, is thought to be two to five days.

It is possible, if not likely, the president was infected before Wednesday, when Hicks started exhibiting signs of illness.

Ronny Jackson, the president’s former White House physician, told Fox News early Friday morning that the positive test would “affect everybody who has been around the president” as they would likely need to self-isolate. He cautioned that it’s not yet clear