Juice

That Kitchen Aid You Use Twice a Year Can Also Make Pasta, Stuff Sausages, Spiralize, and Juice

At the risk of dating myself here, I have had a KitchenAid stand mixer for more than 16 years. My wife and I got it as an engagement party gift, as one does. Truth be told, for the first decade-plus of our marriage, the rather large, clunky mixer spent most of its time in a kitchen cabinet. It only saw the light of day to mix up the occasional cake batter or to mix together ingredients for muffins, bread, and other rarely-prepared eats.



a room filled with furniture and a mirror: Photo Illustration by Scouted/The Daily Beast/Amazon


© Provided by The Daily Beast
Photo Illustration by Scouted/The Daily Beast/Amazon

Then we started reading up on the thing — it turns out that calling this thing a mixer is akin to calling a Swiss Army Knife a blade. Sure, it mixes, with multiple speeds, the capacity for more than 100 cookies in a single batch of batter, mixer attachments for all types of batter, dough, sauces, and you get it. But if you never use all the other stuff in your Swiss Army Knife – scissors, bottle opener, and corkscrew most often, I’ll wager – you’re doing it wrong. And man were we ever.

See, it’s not really about the accessories that go into the mixing bowl, but rather about all the attachments you can connect to the front of the unit while the bowl is removed. These include a pasta press with the ability to make six different types of pasta, including spaghetti, fusilli, and large macaroni. There’s a slow juicer that can process everything from apples to berries to carrots or even kale. There are multiple blades that can slice, dice, shred, or spiralize. There’s a grain mill, because of course there is. This thing can even be outfitted with a meat grinder or sausage stuffer.

If you love preparing food, be

White House Rolls Out Tons More COVID Tests to Juice Reopening

President Donald Trump announced Monday that his administration would hand out 100 million coronavirus tests to states across the country, free of charge, for community distribution but stressed state leaders should use the additional resources to reopen schools.

The administration plans to ship the Abbott BinaxNOW point of care tests in batches and will distribute them on a per capita basis, according to officials working with the White House coronavirus task force. It’s unclear which states will receive the tests first

In a private call on Monday morning, Vice President Mike Pence pleaded with governors directly, saying that while they are free to use the tests as they see fit, the administration is distributing the tests with the “hope” that state leaders use them to reopening of schools.

The testing rollout comes as scientists, including those working with Trump’s own coronavirus task force, warn that Americans could face a significant risk in the upcoming months if governors continue to allow their residents to socialize in crowded indoor settings, including bars and restaurants, and if they do not adequately control the spread of the virus on college campuses. Even Pence, the leader of the task force, said Americans should expect the situation to worsen in the coming weeks. “Cases will rise in the days ahead,” he told reporters Monday in the Rose Garden.

Despite those warnings, Trump and his advisers in the White House continue to downplay fears of another COVID19 wave by overpromising the reach of the new infusion of testing supplies. Trump has repeatedly told the American people that a vaccine is just around a corner even as top officials say the public will not have access to the remedy until well into next year. On Monday, Trump deployed a similar tactic, saying his administration would send 100