late

Contact tracing for White House outbreak came too late, experts say

  • President Donald Trump and at least 34 White House staffers and contacts have been infected with the coronavirus following Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination ceremony at the White House Rose Garden on September 26.
  • The White House accepted the CDC’s offer to help with contact tracing on Wednesday, The Washington Post reported.
  • Epidemiologists say those efforts may have come too late: People should be tested within two weeks of getting exposed.
  • The outbreak has likely “spread beyond the White House at this point,” one expert said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Recent visitors to the White House received a letter from health officials on Thursday. It came with a warning: If they had worked in the White House in the past two weeks, attended the recent Supreme Court announcement ceremony, or had close contact with people who fit that description, they should get tested for the coronavirus. Ideally, they should already be quarantining as well.

The letter, signed by 10 health departments in the Washington, DC, area, expressed concern about a lack of contact tracing following a superspreader event at the White House.

Nearly 200 people gathered in the White House’s Rose Garden on September 26 to see President Donald Trump officially nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The majority of those attendees didn’t wear a mask. Many hugged and shook hands. A smaller group attended an indoor reception following the ceremony, where they again mingled without masks. 

At least 34 White House staffers and contacts have since been infected with the coronavirus, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. That includes bodyguards, family members, pastors, journalists, GOP senators, and advisors.

Trump tested positive for the virus on October 1. Shortly after, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offered to

John Lennon’s sister Julia remembers late singer on his 80th birthday

John Lennon’s sister has opened up about growing up with the late singer in Liverpool, revealing their mother would rehearse with the Beatles as teens in the kitchen. 

Julia Baird, 73, who continues to live in Liverpool, appeared on This Morning today to mark what would have been the music legend’s 80th birthday , and told of the ‘close knit’ family unit in which she and John grew up. 

She told how their mother, who was also called Julia, always ‘encouraged’ the singer’s dreams, despite other parents they knew deterring their children from pursuing a career in music. 

John’s sister told how their mum would play the ‘washboard and the banjo’ as her son practised in their Springwood home, and that her brother and pal Paul McCartney had a ‘determination’ that other young musicians didn’t. 

John Lennon's sister has opened up about growing up with the late singer in Liverpool, revealing their mother would rehearse with the Beatles as teens in the kitchen. Pictured, John in 1963

John Lennon’s sister has opened up about growing up with the late singer in Liverpool, revealing their mother would rehearse with the Beatles as teens in the kitchen. Pictured, John in 1963

Julia Baird, 73, who continues to live in Liverpool, appeared on This Morning today to mark what would have been the music legend's 80th birthday

Julia Baird, 73, who continues to live in Liverpool, appeared on This Morning today to mark what would have been the music legend’s 80th birthday

‘We didn’t know any differently,’ said Julia. ‘John was our brother, we were always together. It was a very close knit family for the youngsters.’ 

When asked whether she always knew that John was special, she admitted that having a brother in a band was nothing special in their local community. 

‘Everyone had a brother that was in a group,’ she told. ‘But they all dropped off as they got to 15, their parents got them out, [they] went to university, they all wanted to do different things. But John and Paul had a determination the others never had.’ 

Speaking of her late mother she went on: ‘In