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Ben Ortwein’s putter, Grace Sanborn’s irons, Evelyn Wong’s bathroom break and Jordan Barker’s chill mood lead to gold

Ben Ortwein spent hours during the COVID-19 pandemic putting in his basement.



a man holding a baseball bat on a field: Notre Dame-Green Pond's Ben Ortwein won the District 11 Class 2A boys golf tournament title thanks to a stellar round of putting Wednesday at Steel Club in Hellertown.


© Rick Kintzel/The Morning Call/The Morning Call/TNS
Notre Dame-Green Pond’s Ben Ortwein won the District 11 Class 2A boys golf tournament title thanks to a stellar round of putting Wednesday at Steel Club in Hellertown.

The Notre Dame-Green Pond junior was not pleased with that part of his golf game after winning the 2019 Colonial League title and …

“It was atrocious,” he said Wednesday. “It was so bad.

“I’m glad all those hours paid off.”

Ortwein completed a stellar round at the District 11 Class 2A golf championships with a 3-over-par 75 to beat Central Catholic’s Nathan Meyers by a shot for the gold medal.



a person swinging a golf club: Moravian Academy golfer Grace Sanborn reacts after draining a birdie put on the ninth green Monday during the Colonial League golf championships at Bethlehem Golf Club. r


© Rick Kintzel/The Morning Call/The Morning Call/TNS
Moravian Academy golfer Grace Sanborn reacts after draining a birdie put on the ninth green Monday during the Colonial League golf championships at Bethlehem Golf Club. r

The Crusader didn’t miss a putt inside of five feet until the last hole, when he knew he had two putts to win.

Ortwein’s round started by draining a birdie putt on the uphill, par-4 first hole. He birdied the par-5 ninth and 14th holes to straighten out his round.

Meyers had the lead until a double bogey on the par-3 16th, then finished bogey-bogey on a day when swirling, gusty winds made it difficult with club selection.

Ortwein, who parred the 17th to take the lead before securing the victory by matching Meyers’ 5 on the last hole, said experience allowed him to focus on the next shot.

“Being able to control your nerves and not let them get out of hand was good,” Ortwein said. “And having a lot of fun [playing]. We had a good group. Everyone was nice. That made it a lot easier

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate

HAPPY WEDNESDAY! Welcome to Overnight Energy, The Hill’s roundup of the latest energy and environment news. Please send tips and comments to Rebecca Beitsch at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter: @rebeccabeitsch. Reach Rachel Frazin at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin.



a man wearing a suit and tie: OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate | Trump official delays polar bear study with potential implications on drilling: report


© Greg Nash
OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role | Trump, Biden spar over climate change at debate | Trump official delays polar bear study with potential implications on drilling: report

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FILL-IN THE BERN: The Department of the Interior will not name a new acting director to lead the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) after its leader was ousted by a federal judge, top officials told employees in an email obtained by The Hill.

Instead the job will be left to Interior Secretary David Bernhardt.

A Montana-based U.S. district judge on Friday ruled William Perry Pendley, the controversial acting director of BLM, “served unlawfully … for 424 days” and enjoined him from continuing in the role.

The decision was in response to a suit from Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), who argued Pendley, whose nomination to lead the BLM was pulled by the White House last month, was illegally serving in his role through a series of temporary orders.

A Wednesday email makes clear that Interior will not be placing the top career official in charge of the nation’s public lands agency, as its department manual dictates.

“I understand there may be some questions about the ruling on Friday regarding William Perry Pendley’s leadership role at the Bureau of Land Management,” Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond wrote in an email to BLM staff.

“Secretary Bernhardt leads the bureau and relies on the BLM’s management team to

Interior Secretary will lead BLM after judge ousts Pendley from public lands role

The Department of the Interior will not name a new acting director to lead the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) after it’s leader was ousted by a federal judge, top officials told employees in an email obtained by The Hill.

Instead the job will be left to Interior Secretary David Bernhardt.

A Montana-based U.S. district judge on Friday ruled William Perry Pendley, the controversial acting director of BLM, “served unlawfully … for 424 days” and enjoined him from continuing in the role.

The decision was in response to a suit from Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court removes Pendley from role as public lands chief | Pendley court ruling could unravel Trump’s public lands decisions | 1 in 4 adults cite climate change in decision not to have children Pendley court ruling could unravel Trump’s public lands decisions Court removes Pendley from role as public lands chief MORE (D), who argued Pendley, whose nomination to lead the BLM was pulled by the White House last month, was illegally serving in his role through a series of temporary orders. 

A Wednesday email makes clear that Interior will not be placing the top career official in charge of the nation’s public lands agency, as its department manual dictates.

“I understand there may be some questions about the ruling on Friday regarding William Perry Pendley’s leadership role at the Bureau of Land Management,” Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond wrote in an email to BLM staff.

“Secretary Bernhardt leads the bureau and relies on the BLM’s management team to carry out the mission. Deputy Director for Programs and Policy, William Perry Pendley, will continue to serve in his leadership role.”

Judge Brian Morris, an Obama appointee, ruled Friday that Interior and the White House improperly relied

Cipollone, Meadows Lead White House Effort to Confirm Barrett to Supreme Court

WASHINGTON—President Trump has nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. But his White House’s work is just beginning.

While the decision to confirm Judge Barrett rests with the Senate, the job of vigorously defending her to reassure those lawmakers—and keep an already-accelerated process on track—will fall squarely to the Trump White House.

The West Wing will have help. The president’s robust re-election team, which has raised more than $1 billion and occupies three floors of a Washington-area office building with multiple TV studios and scores of staff, has been prepped to support the nominee. A coterie of conservative issue groups and public-relations firms are mounting their own $20 million marketing campaign.

But the tip of that spear remains Mr. Trump’s West Wing, which must overcome its own internal divisions, a dearth of deep relationships in the Senate and a mixed record of achievement on Capitol Hill.

Mr. Trump has replaced nearly all of his senior staff since Justice Neil Gorsuch was confirmed on April 7, 2017, and most of the top aides who helped with the last Supreme Court nominee, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was confirmed on Oct. 6, 2018.

Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, are both new to the job since Mr. Kavanaugh was confirmed. Their partnership will determine the success of the White House confirmation team, officials said.

President Trump formally nominated Amy Coney Barrett on Saturday to fill the vacant Supreme Court seat left by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters

The White House team for Ms. Barrett’s confirmation has been slow to coordinate on messaging with its Senate counterparts, according to people familiar with the process. But others said it is on track, pointing out that Judge Barrett started filling out a lengthy