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Dauphin County hideaway home on wooded lot boasts chef’s kitchen, 3 levels of decks: Cool Spaces

Situated on almost four acres of wooded land, this home sits tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac in the Derry Woods development.



a large kitchen with stainless steel appliances and wooden cabinets: The kitchen area


© A Cool Spaces home at 479 English Ivy Court in Derry Township.rSeptember 25, 2020.rDan Gleiter | d…
The kitchen area

Every view is one of natural beauty thanks to large windows and three levels of decks and balconies. Natural plantings in the front and back attract wildlife.

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Inside, wooden floors can be found throughout the home. A dining room flows into a chef’s kitchen with two ovens, two microwaves, two sinks, a large island and plenty of storage space.

Counter seating is available in the kitchen as well as in an adjoining great room with vaulted ceilings, skylights and fireplace.

The master suite has its own balcony, large windows overlooking the backyard and a walk-in closet and a master bath.

The finished lower level offers a huge amount of living space with a TV and game areas and large bonus space with a wet bar, bedroom with a full bath and an office.

Located at 479 English Ivy Court in Derry Township, the home is listed at $769,000 by The Judy Stover Team, with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Homesale Realty.

Want more Cool Spaces? See all of our stories showcasing the neatest homes, businesses and museums in Pennsylvania by clicking here. Know of any Cool Spaces? Submit ideas to [email protected]

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©2020 The Patriot-News (Harrisburg, Pa.)

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‘Black Space Matters’ exhibit changes asphalt lot to garden

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A local activist transformed a vacant lot outside the Institute for Contemporary Art in Richmond to highlight issues of food security and the importance of Black and brown community spaces.

The “Commonwealth” exhibit at Virginia Commonwealth University’s ICA features work from 10 artists including an outdoor installation created by activist and community farmer Duron Chavis who builds gardens throughout Richmond. The full exhibit seeks to examine how common resources influence the wealth and well-being of communities.

Chavis proposed the resiliency garden exhibit in 2019 during a public forum at the ICA. The resiliency garden—food grown to weather the tough times and to have food independence— is installed in an asphalt lot at Grace and Belvidere streets next to the ICA and features 30 raised beds of fruits, vegetables and flowers.

An extension of the garden exhibit is the “Black Space Matters” mural by Southside artist Silly Genius. A wall in the lot is painted, with fruit making the word Black and beneath the garden in big, yellow letters is “Space Matters.” The garden beds have historic quotes from civil rights leaders Kwame Ture and Malcolm X, among other activists.

“Black Space Matters means that Black people need space,” Chavis said. “We need space that is explicitly designed, planned, and implemented by Black and brown people.”

Chavis, along with a crew of volunteers, started building the garden on Aug. 10 while the ICA temporarily closed to install other exhibits.

“We invited him to think with us about how to activate a vacant lot next to the ICA,” said Stephanie Smith, ICA chief curator. “You could think about what it means to take a space and institutional resources, then give them over to an activist.”

Chavis seeks to address lack of food access through his activism. Food

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society turned a Manayunk parking lot into an awesome Pop Up Beer Garden paradise

MANAYUNK (WPVI) — Travel just a half block off Main Street in Manayunk and you’ll find a lot filled with more than 22-hundred plants, many getting a second life after this year’s PHS Philadelphia Flower Show

It’s a space perfect for COVID-19 with 20,000 square feet of open space that can hold up to 150 socially-distanced people.

The cocktails use herbs from the garden and there’s a menu of bar food and a backdrop of urban grit.

The site holds a community garden, part of the PHS Harvest 2020 program to help feed families in need. Harvests are being donated to Manayunk’s Northlight Community Center. To volunteer in the garden, email Cristina Tessaro: [email protected]

PHS Pop Up Garden | Beer Garden Menu
106 Jamestown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19127

Copyright © 2020 WPVI-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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‘This is a busy White House’: Trump told Dr. Fauci he didn’t have a lot of time to talk about COVID-19: Bob Woodward

President Trump reportedly told journalist Bob Woodward that he was too busy to meet with Dr. Anthony Fauci one-on-one in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

A previously unheard recording of Trump released Monday shows Trump shrugging off the need for more in-depth meetings with the nation’s top infectious disease specialist, CNN reported Monday.

“This is a busy White House,” Trump told Woodward in March as the death toll started rising. “We’ve got a lot of things happening.”

“Honestly there’s not a lot of time for that, Bob,” the president added.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci


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President Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci

President Trump and Dr. Anthony Fauci

Video: Martha MacCallum on Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis: ‘The President seemed impenetrable’ (FOX News)

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The new recording is from one of 18 interviews that Trump gave to Woodward for the iconic journalist’s book “Rage” about Trump’s White House.

Earlier recordings revealed that Trump admitted that he “like(s) playing down” the threat from the pandemic to the public even though he knew how dangerous it was.

In the new recording, Trump praises Fauci as “a sharp guy” but again seeks to tamp down the need for a full-court press to battle the virus, which was just starting to kill significant numbers of Americans.

Last week, the Republican president became one of 7.4 million Americans who contracted coronavirus and to date, he is currently receiving treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Woodward has said he believes Trump’s mishandling of the virus shows that he is profoundly unfit to lead the country.

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Bethenny Frankel Buys a Lot of Home Decor, but These Affordable Stores Are Her Faves

Bethenny Frankel has never listened to a podcast before, so, naturally, she decided to launch one of her own. “Everyone said I should listen to other ones, but I don’t want to have a preconceived notion of what successful people are doing and end up with something similar,” she says of her new venture, Just B With Bethenny Frankel. “I don’t like anything derivative.” 

Out now, Just B features interviews with notable figures like Mark Cuban, Bozoma Saint John, Maria Shriver, and Paris Hilton, mixed with the biting humor fans loved from Frankel’s eight-year tenure on The Real Housewives of New York. “This podcast is all me,” she says. “There’s no filler, no foreplay—we get right to the act.”

Her M.O. is untraditional for some of her splashy guests, who are used to knowing what they’re getting into ahead of time. “No one gets the questions in advance,” she says. “I don’t want anything canned. I’m not plowing through questions that are easy to answer—we’re having a conversation. I want to know what dating is like, if you’re lonely, if you feel like your age matters, what work ethic means to you, what it’s like to raise a rich child when you came from nothing…they’re not typical questions.” 

Unsurprisingly, Frankel’s style is working: “People are revealing things for the first time. I’m hearing things I’ve never heard Mark Cuban, Andy Cohen, or Paris Hilton say out loud.” Frankel hopes Just B inspires listeners to apply the wisdom and lessons learned to their own lives. 

And if there’s anything we’ve come to learn about Frankel as a philanthropist, entrepreneur, author, and producer, it’s that she doesn’t do anything half-assed. “One high-profile guest told me it was the best interview they’ve ever done,” she says.

Frankel took a break between