October

Lucky Bird Los Angeles Partners With Epic Kitchens to Open First Ghost Kitchen in Chicago on October 1st

CHICAGO, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Lucky Bird, best known for its juicy Fried Chicken Buckets and sandwiches, has partnered with Epic Kitchens to open the brand’s first ghost kitchen in Chicago on September 21. The popular chef-driven restaurant located in Los Angeles’s historic Grand Central Station will offer a diverse menu of signature fried chicken dishes, delicious sides, and beverages for locals to order through EpicKitchens.com and via third-party delivery partners including DoorDash, Uber Eats, Grubhub, Caviar, and Postmates. 

Originally founded in Downtown Los Angeles in August 2018 by Chef Chris Dane, the philosophy of Lucky Bird is good fried chicken can solve anything. Making everything from scratch, from buttermilk biscuits to homemade hot sauce, Lucky Bird does their very best to source ingredients locally to ensure the freshest and highest quality product, but most of all they believe there are not many things a bucket of chicken can’t solve.

“We couldn’t be happier to be opening in Chicago. Being able to share fried chicken with people from all over was always one of the main driving factors in opening Lucky Bird, and having our first location outside of Los Angeles be Chicago makes total sense because Chicago is a food Mecca for many with countless great restaurants, so we hope the people of Chicago will open their arms to one more.” said Chef, Chris Dane.

The Chicago incarnation of Lucky Bird will be open for lunch and dinner. Signature dishes on the menu include Fried Chicken Buckets with a mix of white & dark meat; Popcorn Chicken served with a smoked paprika dipping sauce; and Fried Sandwiches served on a   Milk bun with a chicken thigh, homemade pickles, smoked paprika aioli & butter lettuce. Sides include Jojo’s pressured fried potato wedges; Homemade

White House Weekly: October 12

We begin on Friday, October 2nd, following his announcement late into Thursday night that he and the First Lady tested positive for COVID-19, President Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed Military Medical Center “out of an abundance of caution.”



a sign in front of a building


© Provided by Washington Examiner


As a result of Trump’s positive test, the Trump campaign postpones all future campaign events. Vice President Mike Pence tests negative for the virus while campaign manager Bill Stepien and former White House adviser Kellyanne Conway test positive. Senators Ron Johnson, Thom Tillis, and Mike Lee also tested positive.

It’s a very sobering moment for the presidency. Faced with a deadly virus with a month until the election created the type of chaos you only see from a so-called October surprise.

Saturday, October 3rd, mixed messages emerge from the White House after Trump’s physician Dr. Sean Conley paints a rosy characterization of the president’s health status. Following the briefing at Walter Reed, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, in an off the record conversation, tells reporters that Trump’s vital signs were far more concerning than what was previously stated, saying he needed to be put on supplemental oxygen. Later, Trump emerges on Twitter, posting a video of his progress.

Meanwhile, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announces he tested positive for COVID-19. Christie, along with several other high profile Republicans, attended the ceremony of Judge Amy Coney Barrett being nominated to the Supreme Court at the White House. He checked into a hospital as a precautionary measure.

Sunday, October 4th, the President briefly leaves Walter Reed in his motorcade to wave at supporters and well-wishers gathered outside.

Trump later puts out a video on his Twitter, saying that he’s “learned a lot” about the virus.

Monday, October 5th, White House Press

Midtown-Hell’s Kitchen, NY Coronavirus Updates & News For October 10



Upper East Side, NY |
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Covid Patient Meets His Plasma Donor | Art Week Underway | VP Debate Lights Up Building | Hospital Marks 1,000th Birth

UES Race Turns Turbulent | Upper East Side Week In Review
(Nick Garber/Patch / Liz Fine / NewYork-Presbyterian / Campaigns of Patrick Bobilin, Rebecca Seawright, Lou Puliafito)

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — Miss any headlines on the Upper East Side this week? Patch’s week in review has you covered for the neighborhood’s top news…. Read more



New York City, NY |
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Closures Hit COVID-19 Hotspots | Schools Shuttered | Students Choose Remote Learning | Murders Hit High

NEW YORK CITY — Here’s a roundup of the top citywide headlines from New York City this week…. Read more



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As the U.S. still reels from the pandemic’s economic fallout, the state’s billionaires all vastly increased their wealth, Forbes found.

NEW YORK – Everyday New Yorkers might be struggling from record unemployment or fearing for the future of their jobs as the coronavirus continues to ravage the country, but the city’s billionaires are doing just fine…. Read more



New York City, NY |
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Social distancing actions largely stopped and warnings to noncompliant businesses dropped in September, 311 data shows.

NEW YORK CITY — Flare ups of coronavirus cases in Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods followed weeks of declining enforcement actions by city agencies, 311 data shows.But complaints over social distancing and reopening businesses breaking safety measures fell as well, indicating New Yorkers as a whole grew more lax and less vigilant when it came to the virus.The dips in enforcement and watchfulness started in August and continued… Read more



New York City, NY |
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First responders and essential workers have been putting their lives on the line during the coronavirus pandemic.

From CBS New York:

October 8 2020

NEW

Would-be Interior Secretary Heinrich lays out his vision — Friday, October 9, 2020 — www.eenews.net

New Mexico Sen. Martin Heinrich has a few recommendations for the next denizen of the White House: It’s time to overhaul the Interior Department and how the nation manages its public lands.

The Democrat — who is widely viewed as a potential pick for Interior secretary should Democratic nominee Joe Biden defeat President Trump next month — outlined his vision yesterday during an event hosted by the Outdoor Industry Association.

Heinrich called for a “national outdoor recreation plan” and described an Interior agency focused more on climate change than on extractive industry.

“We need a presidential administration to have a modern vision for public land management that’s really rooted in conservation and solving the climate crisis and very aware of the needs of all our recreation partners,” Heinrich said during the event, promoted as “The 2020 Election and Beyond: What’s at stake for the outdoor recreation economy? A conversation with Senator Martin Heinrich.”

The New Mexico lawmaker lamented that both Interior and the Forest Service continue to operate under “foundational laws” created to emphasize beef production, timber harvesting or ore extraction, arguing the modern economy “needs very different things.”

“Given the desire of Americans for outdoor recreation, environmental justice, climate solutions, the preservation of biodiversity, clean water and rural economic development, we really need to reorientate the Department of the Interior and the U.S. Forest Service toward those objectives,” he added. “The mission of public land management should really be focused on serving the American public and safeguarding the values that deliver all of those public benefits.”

While Heinrich said his proposed overhaul of Interior and the Forest Service, which operates under the Department of Agriculture, could be largely achieved via the executive branch, he also envisions congressional involvement.

“I think it’s an enormous opportunity,” Heinrich said. “I certainly wouldn’t

White House down – Covid upturns the US election (again): the 9 October Guardian Weekly

Video: Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate (France 24)

Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The old adage is that a week is a long time in politics – this year’s US election is making a day in politics feel like an eternity. Since we went to press last week, hot off revelations about Donald Trump’s tax returns, we witnessed the miserable spectacle of the first presidential debate in Cleveland. That event – an international embarrassment for the US – was quickly overshadowed a few days later by the news that the president and his wife, Melania, had both tested positive for coronavirus.



Photograph: GNM


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: GNM

The resulting chaos – a four-day stay in hospital, many of Trump’s inner circle also testing positive and the still-ill Trump’s supposedly triumphal return to the White House on Monday evening – capped yet another unbelievable week in Trumpworld. Our world affairs editor Julian Borger analyses Trump’s desperate departure from hospital and Stephanie Kirchgaessner meticulously details the spread of Covid-19 in the administration to work out how we got from the Rose Garden reveal of Amy Coney Barrett to the supposed leader of the free world being given a cocktail of experimental drug treatments.



qr code: The 9 October 2020 edition of Guardian Weekly.


© Photograph: GNM
The 9 October 2020 edition of Guardian Weekly.

Last year, the Guardian made its inaugural climate pledge: a journalistic and business commitment to covering the global climate emergency and doing our best to contribute to it as little as possible. Since then, the Guardian has published more than 3,000 articles on the environment – many of which you will have read in the Guardian Weekly. You can read Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner’s 2020 climate pledge in this week’s issue. Before