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Home decor store Swatty Creek Mill opens in Dauphin County

Tiffany Williams launched an online home décor business, Swatty Creek Mill last year. And now Swatty Creek Mill has a place to call home in Hummelstown.

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Swatty Creek Mill opened last month in a former pharmacy at 28 W. Main St.

The store sells a variety of items including seasonal home decor, soap, florals, potpourri, t-shirts, blankets, pillows, rugs, candles, snacks, gifts, apparel and some vintage items in the four-room facility.

Williams said that the new shop will allow her to have all of the of the store’s items centrally located and available for shipping nationally or the items can now be picked up in Hummelstown.

In the future, she hopes to host “do it Yourself” and “how to” classes at the store and she also hopes to have space for local vendors as well.

Previously, Williams was an assistant vice president with Members 1st Federal Credit Union. Last year she started Swatty Creek Mill by selling items through Etsy, Amazon and the company website. She also sold items from the store at a booth in the Palmyra area. And she has a booth at Olde Factory Antiques and Crafts in Hummelstown and she will continue to do so.

Swatty Creek Mill is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

–Business Buzz

You can follow Daniel Urie on twitter @DanielUrie2018 and you can like PennLive’s business page on Facebook at @PennLiveBusiness

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Houston’s new botanical garden opens

It’s a loss for golfers but a big win for plant lovers. After decades in the planning stage, the Houston Botanic Garden finally opened September 18 on the former Glenbrook Golf Course in southeast Houston. The garden serves as yet another draw for locals and visitors to explore Sims Bayou, a watershed area near Hobby Airport that already includes miles of walking and biking trails and countless places to launch canoes.

a garden with greenery and white flowers

“The garden will showcase international and native plant collections, educational classes for children and adults, and provide engaging programming that will embrace the garden and natural settings,” said Justin Lacey, director of communications and community engagement at Houston Botanic Garden. The international firm West 8 designed and managed the overall garden project, with Harvey Cleary Builders as the general contractor. Houston’s Clark Condon designed the garden’s planting and soil, with installation by Landscape Art.

Related: Failed Palm Springs golf course is being repurposed

a garden of rocks and succulents

Building a garden

By the time Nancy Thomas, past president of the Garden Club of America, and the late Kay Crooker formed the nonprofit Houston Botanic Garden in 2002, they’d already been talking about it for years. The two women dreamed of a massive botanic garden that would rival those of other metropolitan cities.

But like all massive projects, the garden took a lot of planning and plenty of money. It wasn’t until 2015 that the Houston City Council unanimously approved a plan for the garden to take a 30-year lease on Glenbrook Golf Course. Garden supporters had to raise $20 million by the end of 2017 to claim the city-owned property.

The garden has been built from the ground up. First, the garden team analyzed how long-term golfing had impacted the soil. Maintaining perfect-looking greens meant decades of intensive mowing and regularly applying pesticides and

Home decor store, Swatty Creek Mill opens in Dauphin County

Tiffany Williams launched an online home décor business, Swatty Creek Mill last year. And now Swatty Creek Mill has a place to call home in Hummesltown.

Swatty Creek Mill opened last month in a former pharmacy at 28 W. Main St.

The store sells a variety of items including seasonal home decor, soap, florals, potpourri, t-shirts, blankets, pillows, rugs, candles, snacks, gifts, apparel and some vintage items in the four-room facility.

Swatty Creek Mill

Swatty Creek Mill is located in Hummelstown (Photo provided)

Williams said that the new shop will allow her to have all of the of the store’s items centrally located and available for shipping nationally or the items can now be picked up in Hummesltown.

In the future, she hopes to host “do it Yourself” and “how to” classes at the store and she also hopes to have space for local vendors as well.

Previously, Williams was an assistant vice president with Members 1st Federal Credit Union. Last year she started Swatty Creek Mill by selling items through Etsy, Amazon and the company website. She also sold items from the store at a booth in the Palmyra area. And she has a booth at Olde Factory Antiques and Crafts in Hummelstown and she will continue to do so.

Swatty Creek Mill is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

Business Buzz

You can follow Daniel Urie on twitter @DanielUrie2018 and you can like PennLive’s business page on Facebook at @PennLiveBusiness

Source Article

Tokyo opens Olympics Pride House

Tokyo on Sunday opened its first major community hub for LGBTQ people this month, part of a pre-Olympics project that campaigners hope will tackle stigma and raise awareness of discrimination.

Pride House Tokyo is based on similar inclusive pop-up sites set up at past Olympics, but will offer a permanent meeting space and information centre, seeking to educate the public about sexual diversity and offer refuge to those suffering harassment or discrimination.

While Japan has some protections for sexual minorities, it remains the only G7 country that does not recognise same-sex unions, and many couples say they can struggle to rent apartments together and are even barred from hospital visits.

Those challenges mean spaces like Pride House, set up in coordination with Tokyo 2020 Olympic organisers, are sorely needed in Japan, activists say.

“Japan, not just in sporting circles but society as a whole — including schools and workplaces — is not friendly to LGBTQ people, and it is hard to come out,” Gon Matsunaka, who heads the project behind Pride House, told AFP.

While the centre is being set up under a recent Olympic tradition, the project is officially named “Pride House Tokyo Legacy”, and activists hope its influence will extend beyond the Games. 

The venue “will be a landmark that could change the landscape for LGBTQ people in Japanese society,” Matsunaka said.

The International Olympic Committee echoed hopes for a lasting legacy.

“In sport, we are all equal,” IOC President Thomas Bach said in a statement released Sunday.

“We therefore welcome that Tokyo 2020 has embedded diversity and inclusion in the Olympic Games model,” he said, wishing “the Pride House Tokyo success”.

– ‘Unthinkable to come out’ –

The first Pride House — inspired by the tradition of Olympic hospitality centres for national teams — was launched at

CapFed Best News: Jong’s Thai Kitchen opens with customers’ needs in mind – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

Banjong Jongthep has always dreamed of owning her own restaurant. After working at Tuptim Thai and co-owning A-Hann Thai, she has branched out and decided to run her own kitchen.

JongThep, along with co-owners Nimm and Derek Ragsdale, has opened Jong’s Thai Kitchen at 800 S.W. 12th St. Many will recognize the Thai restaurant’s new home as the former location of Cafe Holliday and, for a short time after that, La Casita Cafe.

While small inside, the restaurant offers customers a warm and inviting feel. Large windows at the front of the restaurant are framed by trees and offer a nice view of the park located across the street.

The restaurant, which opened Sept. 21, specializes in Thai dishes that are handcrafted by Jongthep herself.

Jong’s Thai Kitchen is open 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 8 p.m. Saturday. Reservations are strongly encouraged.

The dishes are packed with flavor and Jongthep will cater to her customers’ needs. If someone comes in and wants an item that isn’t on the menu and she has time, she will cook it.

“A lot of people say, ’Banjong, I don’t know what to eat or what I want.’ I say, ’OK,’ ” Jongthep said. “I want you to come here and get what you want and make you happy.”

Her ultimate goal is to make sure her customers leave happy and serve them unique and fresh food.

The menu items are meals that the three owners like to eat and Jongthep has adapted them.

Melissa’s Chicken is stir-fried chicken breast marinated in a house seasoning with a touch of white rum, bell pepper, mushrooms, onion and basil in a brown sauce.

Ross’ Curry is made with a Thai red curry paste, coconut milk, bell pepper, Thai egg plant,