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Judge lifts house arrest order against former Colombian President Uribe

BOGOTA (Reuters) – A judge on Saturday lifted a house arrest order against former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe, who is under investigation for alleged witness tampering.

FILE PHOTO: Colombia’s former president and lawmaker Alvaro Uribe, arrives to a private hearing at Supreme Court of Justice in Bogota, Colombia October 8, 2019. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez/File Photo

Uribe has been held under the order since August.

The decision is the latest twist in a long-running legal battle and is likely to disappoint Uribe’s detractors, who had hailed the house arrest as a triumph of judicial independence.

“The decision adopted by this official is to agree to the request submitted by the defense, supported by the Attorney General’s Office and the representation of the public prosecutor and as such Dr. Alvaro Uribe Velez will be granted his immediate freedom,” said Judge Clara Ximena Salcedo.

“Thank God,” Uribe said in a message on Twitter following the decision.

Following his house arrest order Uribe resigned his senate seat, leading the court to transfer the case to the attorney general’s office, which critics say will be less rigorous.

Detractors will blame for the outcome on the attorney general’s Office and the way it has handled the case, said political analyst Sergio Guzman of Colombia Risk Analysis.

“The lion’s share of the blame will go to the attorney general’s office and it’s handling of the case,” Guzman told Reuters.

Uribe and several allies are being investigated over allegations of witness tampering carried out in an attempt to discredit accusations he had ties to right-wing paramilitaries.

Polarizing Uribe, a mentor to current President Ivan Duque, has insisted he is innocent.

In 2012, Uribe accused leftist Senator Ivan Cepeda of orchestrating a plot to tie him to right-wing paramilitary groups.

But in 2018, the Supreme Court said Cepeda had collected

Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


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Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.

But after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away, the president is seizing an opportunity to try to reposition himself in the race, despite the apparent health risk to attendees from a man likely to still be contagious.

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In a Friday night interview on Fox News, Trump, who was given a cocktail of antiviral drugs and strong steroids during his hospital stay, insisted he was “medication-free”.

“We pretty much finished, and now we’ll see how things go. But pretty much nothing,” Trump said when Fox medical analyst Dr Marc Siegel asked the president what medications he was still taking.

Earlier in the day, Dr Sean Conley, Trump’s personal physician, issued a letter clearing the president to return to in-person campaign events, but

For 3rd time, groups seek end to Trump order on House seats

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — For the third time in two months, civil rights groups and state and local governments were asking judges to strike down a directive from President Donald Trump that would exclude people living in the U.S. illegally from being counted when deciding how many congressional seats each state gets.

The coalition of civil rights groups and state and local governments called Thursday on federal judges in California to rule that Trump’s order was illegal, claiming it discriminates against people based on race, ethnicity, and national origin. They said Trump’s order goes against 230 years of U.S. history, will cause them to lose political representation and is discouraging people in the country illegally from participating in the 2020 census.

Trump administration attorneys say the challenge to the order is premature and should be dismissed.


The numbers used for deciding how many congressional seats each state gets is a process known as apportionment. It is derived from the once-a-decade head count of every U.S. resident that is set to end at the end of the month. The census also helps determine the distribution of $1.5 trillion in federal funding annually.

After Trump issued the order last July, around a half dozen lawsuits were filed across the U.S., challenging it. Hearings on the order already have been held in Washington and New York, and a panel of three federal judges in New York ruled that it was unlawful. The Trump administration has appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The New York judges didn’t rule on the constitutionality of the memorandum, merely saying it violated federal laws on the census and apportionment. That left open the door for the judges in the other cases to rule on other aspects of the president’s memorandum. Other lawsuits challenging the memorandum have been filed

You can now order Miso Robotics’ latest kitchen robot for $30,000

Miso Robotics today announced that its newest kitchen robot, Flippy Robot-on-a-Rail (ROAR), is now commercially available. The final design, which can cook up to 19 food items, mounts the robot on a recessed overhead rail to avoid interfering with human staff. On the backend, improvements to ChefUI, Miso’s software, aim to assist staff with workflows through a dashboard displayed on a 15.6-inch touchscreen mounted to the robot. An Intel depth sensor enables ChefUI to identify food and temperatures while learning to reclassify new foods introduced to ROAR.

ROAR costs around $30,000, but Miso plans to continue to price it down over the next year to $20,000 or less through a $1,000 monthly “robot-as-a-service” fee that includes regular updates and maintenance. ROAR can be purchased on a payment plan through TimePayments, and in the future, Miso says it will offer other financing options involving a lower upfront deployment fee and correspondingly higher software-as-a-service fee.

As declines in business resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic place strains on the hospitality segment, Miso believes that robots working alongside human workers can cut costs while improving efficiency — and overall safety. The company asserts its restaurant partners’ pilots to test ROAR create avenues for reducing human contact with food during the cooking process, ensuring consistency while freeing up human cooks to focus on less repetitive tasks.

Miso Robotics Flippy ROAR

Miso has long claimed that ROAR and its predecessor, Flippy, can boost productivity by working with humans as opposed to replacing them. ROAR can be installed under a standard kitchen hood or on the floor, allowing it to work two stations and interact with a cold storage hopper. It benefits from enhancements to ChefUI that expand the number of cookable food categories to chicken tenders, chicken wings, tater tots, french fries and waffle fries, cheese sticks, potato wedges, corn

White House Reportedly Overruled CDC’s Attempt to Extend ‘No-sail Order’ Into 2021

The White House blocked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s attempt to extend its “No-Sail Order” on cruise ships in U.S. waters until next year, according to reports.



a large ship in the water: Sam Greenwood/Getty Images


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Sam Greenwood/Getty Images

The order, which prevents “cruise ships with the capacity to carry at least 250 passengers in waters subject to U.S. jurisdiction” from sailing, has been in effect since March, and extended multiple times, was set to expire on Thursday. While Robert Redfield, the director of the CDC, pushed to once again extend it until February 2021, he was overruled, Axios first reported, citing a conversation in the White House Situation Room.



a large ship in the water: The CDC intended to push the order to February of next year.


© Sam Greenwood/Getty Images
The CDC intended to push the order to February of next year.

Instead, per Axios, the Trump administration plans to extend the order to October 31 — a date that aligns with the decision by the Cruise Lines International Association to postpone ocean sailings in U.S. waters until at least November. The CLIA represents major cruise lines around the world.

Republican politicians in Florida, where a large contingent of the U.S. cruise industry is based, and cruise industry lobbyists have called for an end to the “No-Sail Order,” The New York Times reported. The White House denied the move was political, Axios noted.

“The president, the vice president, and the task force follow the science and data to implement policies that protect the public health and also facilitate the safe reopening of our country,” White House deputy press secretary Brian Morgenstern told Axios. “It is not about politics. It is about saving lives.”

While cruise ships may be able to launch in November, several lines have suspended sailings into next year, including Carnival Cruise Line, which canceled cruises until the spring and predicted it won’t see