passes

Snowfall alerts issued for mountain passes in B.C.’s Southern Interior



a train covered in snow: Weather conditions at the Pennask Summit on the Okanagan Connector on Tuesday morning.


© DriveBC
Weather conditions at the Pennask Summit on the Okanagan Connector on Tuesday morning.

Snowfall warnings have been issued for several mountain passes in B.C.’s Southern Interior.

Sent out by Environment Canada on Tuesday morning at 10:42 a.m., the warnings say drivers should be on the lookout for adverse weather conditions and take safety precautions.

The national weather agency says a strong frontal system is moving across the province, and that freezing levels have fallen in advance of the system.

Read more: Snow and wind warnings in place for much of B.C. Tuesday

It added that 10 to 15 centimetres of snow is expected Tuesday, with an additional 10 to 15 centimetres possible in the evening and overnight.

The national weather agency also issued special weather statements, including for:

Highway 3 (Paulson Summit to Kootenay Pass)

Highway 97C (Okanagan Connector, Pennask Summit)

Highway 1 (Eagle Pass to Rogers Pass)

Yoho Park / Kootenay Park.

For the Coquihalla, Environment Canada says snow has changed to rain but is expected to switch back to flurries near the summit overnight.

For the Pennask Summit and Kootenay Pass, snow is predicted to taper off Tuesday afternoon, with 15 centimetres expected.

Read more: Cool B.C. temperatures spark annual crush of swapping to winter tires

Elevations:

Town of Hope: 41 metres (134 feet)

City of Kelowna: 344 metres (1,128 feet)

City of Revelstoke: 480 metres (1,574 feet)

Town of Merritt: 605 metres (1,984 feet)

Eagle Pass, Highway 1: 550 metres (1,804 feet)

Coquihalla Highway Summit: 1,210 metres (3,969 feet)

Rogers Pass, Highway 1: 1,330 metres (4,363 feet)

Paulson Summit, Highway 3: 1,446 metres (4,744 feet)

Bill to expand support for community addiction treatment passes House

A bill that would establish a $25 million fund to support organizations specializing in addiction treatment and support for family members of those suffering from addiction is heading to the Senate after passing the House last week.

The Family Support Services for Addiction Act, introduced by a bipartisan group of lawmakers including Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMeeting Trump Supreme Court pick a bridge too far for some Democrats Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for SCOTUS confirmation hearings before election Sunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election MORE (D-N.Y.) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoHillicon Valley: Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives | Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 | Democrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference GOP senators call on Trump to oppose nationalizing 5G Congress must finish work on popular conservation bill before time runs out MORE (R-WV) in the Senate as well as Reps. David TroneDavid John TroneUS Chamber of Commerce set to endorse 23 House freshman Democrats Preventing the opioid epidemic from getting worse requires attacking it at the source Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers MORE (D-Md.) and Dan MeuserDaniel (Dan) MeuserMORE (R-Pa.) in the House, passed the lower chamber via voice vote on Thursday.

Under the bill, local and national groups under a wide umbrella of addiction-related services would be allowed to apply for grants under a fund established to provide $25 million in grants over half a decade. Applicable groups include addiction support groups for both those with addictions and their families, education and training organizations, as well as “systems navigation” services which help families find addiction treatment centers.

“Addressing the addiction crisis in our state requires supporting families who are impacted by

Coronavirus live updates: House passes $2.2 trillion COVID-19 stimulus bill

The House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus relief bill late Thursday night, with a close 214-207 vote.

In some last-minute drama, 18 Democrats voted no on the bill. Many who were against the bill are moderates who are very unhappy with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and leadership for staging what they call a “show” vote on a bill that will never become law.

The Republican-led Senate is not expected to take up the measure.

The House bill is largely symbolic and puts on the record what Democrats have been calling for for months; economic relief for those impacted by the pandemic.

The bill would restore the $600 federal unemployment benefits that expired in July and would include another round of direct checks to Americans at $1,200 per taxpayer and $500 per dependent.

It would also extend the Paycheck Protection Program to help small businesses, a benefit that expired in early August.

A bipartisan COVID-19 relief bill is still possible. Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are still having discussions. Pelosi announced late Thursday that she and Mnuchin have exchanged paper and are still deep in negotiations.

“We made a lot of progress over the last few days, we still don’t have an agreement, but we have more work to do. And we’re going to see where we end up,” Mnuchin told reporters Wednesday.

ABC News’ Mariam Khan contributed to this report.

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U.S. House passes Democratic COVID-19 aid plan after bipartisan deal proves elusive

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday approved a $2.2 trillion Democratic plan to provide more economic relief from the coronavirus pandemic, as a bipartisan deal continued to elude House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the White House.

Objections from top Republicans are likely to doom the House Democrats’ plan in the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has called the $2.2 trillion price tag “outlandish,” although Democrats have reduced the cost of their proposal by over a trillion dollars since May. The House vote was 214-207.

No Republican voted for the Democratic plan, although 18 Democrats voted no, many of them moderates from swing districts who have been urging Pelosi to bring a bipartisan proposal to the House floor.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Representative Abigail Spanberger, one of the Democrats who voted no, said.

Republican President Donald Trump’s negotiating team has suggested a $1.6 trillion response, and the White House on Thursday dismissed Democrats’ $2.2 trillion plan as not serious.

Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have talked every day this week, including a 50-minute phone call Thursday, in an effort to negotiate a bipartisan aid package to respond to the economic fallout from a pandemic that has killed more than 207,000 Americans and thrown millions out of work.

Congress and the White House approved more than $3 trillion worth of coronavirus relief measures earlier this year, but Mnuchin, as well as members of Congress from both parties, have argued more stimulus is needed.

Asked if there would be a resolution to her negotiations with the administration on Thursday evening, Pelosi told reporters, “No.” She gave no details of their talks but said: “Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until

House passes Democratic pandemic relief measure

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion Covid-19 relief bill Thursday night as negotiations between the administration and Democrats have failed to yield a bipartisan deal and the time to pass new relief measures ahead of November’s election ticks away.

The measure passed 214-207. No Republicans supported it and 18 Democrats voted against it. Nearly all of the Democrats who voted against the bill are locked in close re-election races.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., said in a statement about why she voted against it. “My focus remains on working with Democrats and Republicans to get relief to my district immediately, and partisan gamesmanship will not do it.”

The legislation, known as Heroes 2.0, is a scaled down version from the Heroes Act, which the House passed in May.

The vote occurred as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin continue to discuss a bipartisan agreement.

Late Thursday, Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol that she spoke to Mnuchin multiple times Thursday but that there was no deal yet.

Asked if one was possible, she said, “I don’t know. It just depends.”

She said that the details matter just as much as how many dollars are being spent, which is an indication that they could be further along in negotiations than they are letting on.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” she said.

According to two sources briefed on the negotiations earlier Thursday, Mnuchin has offered Pelosi a total spending level of $1.62 trillion, up from the $1.5 trillion he had previously suggested.

Inching closer to Pelosi’s demands, Mnuchin agreed to $250 billion more spending for state and local efforts — something