Prices

Prime Day Withings deals: these smart bathroom scale prices just got WAY lighter

One great thing about Amazon Prime Day is that you’ll not only find cheap Apple watch deals and cheap Bose deals but also stuff like smart bathroom scale deals such as these ones from Withings.  Many Withings scales have received a Prime Day price cut including the Withings Body Cardio, one of the best bathroom scales at the moment.

• Shop all the discounted Withings smart bathroom scales at Amazon, prices from £44.96

These Withings smart bathroom scales automatically synchronise with the Withings Health Mate app and support more than just one user profiles. the most advanced model, the Withings Body Cardio, can even monitor heart and cardiovascular health and even has a pregnancy tracker and baby mode too.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals are also coming in slowly but steadily, better bookmark those pages too.

Withings Body Cardio | On sale for £91 | Was £129.95 | You save £38.95 at Amazon
Bathroom scales won’t get much smarter than the Withings Body Cardio. Among other metrics, the Body Cardio tracks heart rate, BMI, fat, muscle mass and water percentage. As well as all that, this smart scale can track pregnancy weight gain and even monitor the baby’s weight in the mother’s body. Needless to say, all this data is an estimate at best but interesting data nevertheless.View Deal

Withings Body | On sale for £43.95 | Was £59.95 | you save £16 at Amazon
The Withings Body might be a bit simpler than the Body Cardio but it still tracks weight and BMI over time and feeds all data back into the Health Mate app automatically. The Health Mate app can be synchronised with Apple Health, Fitbit App, Google Fit and even MyFitnessPal so even if you have a Fitbit or Apple Watch, using the Withings Body will

Prime Day deals: these Withings smart bathroom scale prices just got WAY lighter

One great thing about Amazon Prime Day is that you’ll not only find cheap Apple watch deals and cheap Bose deals but also stuff like smart bathroom scale deals such as these ones from Withings.  Many Withings scales have received a Prime Day price cut including the Withings Body Cardio, one of the best bathroom scales at the moment.

• Shop all the discounted Withings smart bathroom scales at Amazon, prices from £44.96

These Withings smart bathroom scales automatically synchronise with the Withings Health Mate app and support more than just one user profiles. the most advanced model, the Withings Body Cardio, can even monitor heart and cardiovascular health and even has a pregnancy tracker and baby mode too.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals are also coming in slowly but steadily, better bookmark those pages too.

Withings Body Cardio | On sale for £87.06 | Was £129.95 | You save £42.88 at Amazon
Bathroom scales won’t get much smarter than the Withings Body Cardio. Among other metrics, the Body Cardio tracks heart rate, BMI, fat, muscle mass and water percentage. As well as all that, this smart scale can track pregnancy weight gain and even monitor the baby’s weight in the mother’s body. Needless to say, all this data is an estimate at best but interesting data nevertheless.View Deal

Withings Body | On sale for £44.96 | Was £59.95 | you save £14.69 at Amazon
The Withings Body might be a bit simpler than the Body Cardio but it still tracks weight and BMI over time and feeds all data back into the Health Mate app automatically. The Health Mate app can be synchronised with Apple Health, Fitbit App, Google Fit and even MyFitnessPal so even if you have a Fitbit or Apple Watch, using the Withings Body will

U.K. House Prices Jump Most Since 2016 in Post-Lockdown Boom

(Bloomberg) — U.K. house prices rose at their strongest annual pace since 2016 last month as Britons’ changing work patterns and a tax reduction on purchases fanned a resurgence.

Average house prices rose 7.3% in September from a year earlier to a record average of 249,870 pounds ($323,000), mortgage lender Halifax said Wednesday. On the month alone, prices gained 1.6%.



chart, histogram: Housing Boom


© Bloomberg
Housing Boom

Since the lockdown started to be eased in May, a wave of buyers have sought to sell up in urban areas such as London to move to places with bigger yards and more green space.

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They’ve been helped by a temporary tax break on home purchases that will expire next year. Prime Minister Boris Johnson signaled more support for the market this week, with a promise of more generous home loans for millions of young first-time buyers.

Real estate agents and economists are unsure how long the upswing can last. Rising unemployment, risk aversion among lenders and a potential resurgence of the virus mean the market may lose momentum in the next few months.

“The release of pent up demand and indeed the stamp duty holiday can only be temporary fillips,” said Russell Galley, managing director at Halifax. “Significant downward pressure on house prices should be expected at some point in the months ahead as the realities of an economic recession are felt ever more keenly.”

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©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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High drug prices driven by profits, House committee reports find

Enormous drug company profits are the primary driver of soaring prescription drug prices in America, according to a damning investigation that Democrats on the House Oversight Committee began releasing Wednesday.

The first two reports in the investigation focus on Celgene and Bristol Myers Squibb’s Revlimid cancer treatment, the price of which has been raised 23 times since 2005, and Teva’s multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone, which has risen in price 27 times since 2007.

The costs have little to do with research and development or industry efforts to help people afford medication, as drug companies often claim, according to the inquiry.

“It’s true many of these pharmaceutical industries have come up with lifesaving and pain-relieving medications, but they’re killing us with the prices they charge,” Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., said as the hearings began Wednesday. He added, “Uninhibited pricing power has transformed America’s pain into pharma’s profit.”

The top Republican on the committee, James Comer of Kentucky, called the investigation a partisan attack. “These hearings seem designed simply to vilify and publicly shame pharmaceutical company executives,” Comer said.

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Much of the drug industry’s profits come at the expense of taxpayers and the Medicare program, say the reports, which say that they are used to pay generous executive bonuses and that they are guarded by aggressive lobbying and efforts to block competition, regulation or systemic change in the United States while the rest of the world pays less.

“The drug companies are bringing in tens of billions of dollars in revenues, making astronomical profits, and rewarding their executives with lavish compensation packages — all without any apparent limit on what they can charge,” committee chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., wrote in a letter attached to the first two staff reports.

Rep. Elijah Cummings,

High drug prices driven by profits, House panel report finds

Enormous drug company profits are the primary driver of soaring prescription drug prices in America, according to a damning investigation that Democrats on the House Oversight Committee began releasing Wednesday.



a group of people standing in front of a television


© Provided by NBC News


The first two reports in the investigation focus on Celgene and Bristol Myers Squibb’s Revlimid cancer treatment, which saw its price hiked 23 times since 2005, and Teva’s multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone, which went up in price 27 times since 2007.

Those costs have little to do with research and development or industry efforts to help people afford medication, as drug companies often claim, according to the probe.

“It’s true, many of these pharmaceutical industries have come up with lifesaving and pain-relieving medications, but they’re killing us with the prices they charge,” said Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) as the hearings began Wednesday. He added that “uninhibited pricing power has transformed America’s pain into pharma’s profit.”

The top Republican on the committee, Rep. James Comer of Kentucky, called the investigation a partisan attack. “These hearings seem designed simply to vilify and publicly shame pharmaceutical company executives,” Comer said.

Much of the drug industry’s profits come at the expense of taxpayers and the Medicare program, are used to pay generous executive bonuses and are guarded by aggressive lobbying and efforts to block competition, regulation or systemic change in the United States while the rest of the world pays less, the reports say.

“The drug companies are bringing in tens of billions of dollars in revenues, making astronomical profits, and rewarding their executives with lavish compensation packages — all without any apparent limit on what they can charge,” committee chair Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) wrote in a letter attached to the first two staff reports.

Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), the former committee chairperson who died last October,