Proud

Sutton Foster Is Proud of Her Quarantine Garden, and All the New Recipes She’s Tried Because of It

From Woman’s Day

During quarantine, Sutton Foster has boldly gone where few New Yorkers have gone before: into the garden. The actress and Broadway star left New York City to quarantine at her lake house, finally giving her the opportunity to have her dream garden. “I’ve always wanted to grow a garden, but I live in New York City so it’s a little tricky,” Foster tells Woman’s Day. “I’ve never had the time, and all of the sudden I’m like, oh my gosh, we’ve been here the whole summer, and we’ve grown carrots from seeds!”

And carrots aren’t all Foster has been able to grow. “I have an herb garden, and chili peppers and jalapeños,” she says. “And we had these random seeds that grew gourds, and we’re growing a pumpkin that we’re going to carve for Halloween. It’s cool stuff like that where it’s like, oh my gosh we grew a pumpkin!”

Though growing produce has been a major source of Foster’s excitement, another reason she loves her garden is because of the cooking opportunities that come with it. And having grown everything from herbs to Brussels sprouts to squash, she’s been able to up her game in the kitchen. “I love cooking,” Foster says. “I’m making a lot of soups right now. I just made a chicken, mushroom, and rice stew, and it’s great to have for lunch.” As Foster begins rehearsals for The Music Man and filming for Younger, her plan is to make a new soup each week to take for lunch. “I’ve been doing a little bit of everything,” she says. Up next: Pumpkin apple soup using the apples she and her family picked on a recent visit to an orchard.

Foster has enjoyed getting her 3-year-old daughter Emily involved in the kitchen, too.

Trump denies knowing who ‘Proud Boys’ are, again declines to condemn white supremacy by name

Leaving the White House for campaign appearances in Minnesota, Trump told reporters he doesn’t know who the “Proud Boys” are — despite having told the far-right group, which reportedly has described itself as “western chauvinist” but not white supremacist, to “stand back and stand by” at the debate.

“I don’t know who the Proud Boys are. I mean, you’ll you have to give me a definition because I really don’t know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down, let law enforcement do their work,” Trump said of the group which has staged counter protests in cities like Portland that have experienced recent violence.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Sept. 30, 2020.

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Sept. 30, 2020.

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Sept. 30, 2020.

Asked directly on Wednesday if he would denounce white supremacy, Trump claimed he has always denounced it — but once again didn’t use the words “white supremacy.”

“I’ve always denounced — any form, any form, any form of any of that — you have to denounce,” Trump said.

A White House spokesperson had said earlier in the day there was nothing for the president to “clarify.”

At Tuesday’s debate, asked by moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News whether he was “willing to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down and not add to the violence,” the president at first said, “Sure, I’m willing to do

White House says there isn’t ‘anything to clarify’ on Proud Boys

  • The White House is making no effort to spin or clear up President Donald Trump’s comments on the Proud Boys during Tuesday night’s debate.
  • In an interview on Fox News, White House Communications Director Alyssa Farah was pressed by host Sandra Smith on what Trump meant by “stand by.”
  • “I don’t think that there’s anything to clarify,” Farah said.
  • Shortly after Trump said, “Proud Boys, stand back and stand by,” the far-right extremist group began using it as a recruiting tool.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Despite substantial blowback and calls from Republicans for President Donald Trump to clear up his comments on the Proud Boys hate group during Tuesday night’s debate, the White House is doubling down.

Fox News host Sandra Smith pressed White House Communications Director Alyssa Farah on the issue Wednesday.

“The president saying, ‘Proud Boys, stand back and stand by’ — does the White House or the president want to clarify or explain what he meant by that?” Smith asked. “Because they’re celebrating it, the group.”

“I don’t think there’s anything to clarify,” Farah replied. “He’s told them to stand back.”

She added: “This president has surged federal resources when violent crime warrants it in cities. He is leading. He doesn’t need any sort of vigilante-ism.”

Following the usual line of attack from Trump, Farah pivoted to blaming Democrats and the left for violence in cities by not accepting the president’s calls for federal law enforcement to go in and use more force than local officials.

“What we’ve called for is Democrat mayors and Democrat governors to call up the resources we’re prepared to make available,” she said.

Meanwhile, Kate Bedingfield, the communications director for former Vice President Joe Biden, told a Daily Beast reporter that Trump squandered